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Nebraska Bird Review 


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3-2007 

Nebraska Bird Review WHOLE ISSUE (March 
2007 ) 75 ( 1 ) 


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Nebraska Bird Review (March 2007) 75(1), WHOLE ISSUE. Copyright 2007, Nebraska Ornithologists' 
Union. Used by permission. 


The Nebraska Bird 
Review 

A Magazine of Ornithology of the 
Nebraska Region 

Volume 75 March 2007 Number 1 



Published by the 

Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc. 
Founded 1899 


Janis M. Paseka, Editor 
Stephen J. Dinsmore, Co-editor 


SSSN 0028-1816 




Nebraska Ornithologist 

s’ Union 

Treasurer's Report 

i 

Decembc 

*31,2006 



General 

. 

Breeding 

. 

Scholarship 

Endowment 


Grand 


Funds 

Bird Atlas 

Fund 

Fund 

Total 

Total 

CHECKING 







Jan, 1, 2006 Balance - Checking 

$1,547.70 

$29.00 


$125.00 


$1,701.70 

BEGEMS 







Donations 

59.00 

. 

60.00 

225.00 

344.00 


Memberships 

2,540.00 



500.00 

3,040.00 


Subscriptions 

435.00 



. 

435.00 


Spring Meeting - Ponca - 2006 

3,645.00 




3,645.00 


Fall Meeting - Lincoln - 2006 

1,807.05 




1,807.05 


Interest 

125.00 




125.00 


NG&P Atlas Grant 


11,068.98 



11,068.98 


NE Breeding Bird Atlas 


270.00 



270.00 


Sub-total Receipts 

. 




$20,735.03 

. 

DISBURSEMENTS 

; ... 


... 

. 

■ 


Spring Meeting - Ponca - 2006 

3,179.80 




3,179.80 


Fall Meeting - Lincoln - 2006 

1,320.45 




1,320.45 


NBR V73 #2, #3, #4; V74 #1, #2 

2,635.39 


...... 

. 

2,635.39 


Newsletter - Printing 

286.68 




286.68 


Postage 

391.05 




391.05 


Insurance 

200.00 




200.00 


Reimburse Molihoff - Atlas #2 


11,415.36 



11,415.36 

. " . 


The Nebraska Bird Review - Yq1.71.Mc>, 1 












































Transfer to CD 


299.00 


125.00 

424.00 


Sub-total Disbursements 





$19,852.73 


Dec. 31, 2006 Balance - Checking 

2,145.38 

(346.38) 

■ 

60.00 

725.00 


$2,584.00 

SAVINGS 





Jan. 1, 2006 Balance - Savings 

$9,102.16 


$1,755.30 



$10,857.46 

Interest 

273.08 




273.08 


Interest from Endowment 

590.93 




590.93 


Moved to CD 9/20/06 

(5,000.00) 




(5,000.00) 


Aug. 31, 2006 Balance - Savings 

$4,966.17 


$1,755.30 


$6,721.47 

Rate - 2% 





CERTIFICATES OF DEPOSIT 







Jan. 1, 2006 Balance - CDs 


$6,957.65 


$33,530.30 


$40,487.95 

Principal Additions 

5,000.00 

299.00 


125.00 

5,424.00 


Interest to Savings 




(590.93) 

(590.93) 


Interest Received 

65.35 

269.06 


1,222.22 

1,556.63 


Dec. 31, 2006 Balance - CDs 

$5,065.35 

$7,525.71 


$34,286.59 


$46,877.65 

Maturity 

9/20/07 

4/28/07 


2/27/07 



CD Annual Rates 

5.40% 

5.12% 


4.25% 



Endowment Principal 




$33,122.00 














Grand Total 

$56,183.12 


Vol. 75 No. 1_The Nebraska Bird Review 

































4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vpl, 11 No, 1 


WINTER FIELD REPORT, December 2006 to February 2007 

Compiled by W. Ross Silcock 
P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 


INTRODUCTION 

Although temperatures varied substantially during the winter, the winter 
average temperature was above normal. There were noticeably more individuals of 
“half-hardy” species reported, possibly as a consequence. These included Yellow- 
bellied Sapsucker, Mourning Dove, Loggerhead Shrike, Hermit Thrush, and Yellow- 
rumped Warbler. 

Otherwise, the period was unremarkable omithologically. 


ABBREVIATIONS 

BOL: Branched Oak L, Lancaster Co; CBC: Christmas Bird Count; Cem: 
Cemetery; FF: Fontenelle Forest, Sarpy Co; GPD: Gavins Point Dam, Cedar-Knox 
Cos; HCR: Harlan Co Res, Harlan Co; LM: L McConaughy, Keith Co; LO; L 
Ogallala, Keith Co; m.ob.; many observers; NC: Nature Center; NOURC: Nebraska 
Ornithologists’ Union Records Committee; NWR: National Wildlife Refuge; PL: 
Pawnee L, Lancaster Co; Res: Reservoir; S-BOL: Seward-Branched Oak L; SL: 
Sewage Lagoon(s). 

GAZETTEER 

DeSoto NWR: Washington Co; Harvard Marsh WPA: Clay Co; Johnson Res: 
Gosper-Dawson Cos; Sutherland Res: Lincoln Co; Wildcat Hills; Scotts Bluff- 
Banner Cos. 

OBSERVERS 

AD: Ann Duey, Scottsbluff; AK; Alice Kenitz, Gering; AO: Alan Orr, Cedar Falls, 
IA; AS: Audrey Sterkel, Sidney; BB: Bob Barry, Missouri Valley, IA; BFH: Bill 
F. Huser, South Sioux City; B&DW: Bruce & Donna Walgren, Casper, WY; CH: 
Carolyn Hall, Bassett; CNK: Clem N. Klaphake, Bellevue; DH: Dave Heidt, 
Norfolk; DK: Dan Kim, Grand Island; DL: Dan Leger, Lincoln; DSt: Dave Stage, 
Elkhom/Omaha; DW: Duane Wolff, Norfolk; D&CN: Don and Colleen Noecker, 
Albion; D&JP: Don & Jan Paseka, Ames; EB: Elliott Bedows, Bellevue; GB: Gary 
Berthe!sen, Lincoln; G&WH: Glen & Wanda Hoge, Alma; JGr: Jan Greer, Council 
Bluffs, IA; JEt: James Etherton, Doniphan; JF: John Flavin, Chadron; JG: Joe 
Gubanyi, Seward; JGJ: Joel G. Jorgensen, Lincoln; JJ: Jan Johnson, Wakefield; JK: 
J. Kirk, Lincoln; JM: John Miller, Lincoln; JR; Juanita Rice, Fairmont; JT: Jerry 
Toll, Omaha; KD: Kathy DeLara, Mitchell; KK: Ken Kranik, Sterling, CO; KL: 
Keith Lacy, Lincoln; LE: Larry Einemann, Lincoln; LK: Lee Kenitz, Gering; LO: 
Linda Ollinger, Wilsonville; LR: Lanny Randolph, Gibbon; LRB: Linda R. Brown, 
Lincoln; L&CF: Laurence & Carol Falk, Nebraska City; L&BP: Loren & Babs 
Padelford, Bellevue; MB: Mark Brogie, Creighton; NB: Norma Brockmoller, 



Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


1 


Winside; PD: Paul Dunbar, Hastings; PJ: Pete Janzen, Wichita, KS; PR: Paul 
Roisen, Sioux City, IA; RD: Roger Dietrich, Yankton, SD; RE: Rick Eades, 
Lincoln; RG: Ruth Green, Bellevue; RH: Robin Harding, Gibbon; RL: Richard 
Luehrs, Kearney; RSg: Ruben Siegfried, Scottsbluff; SJD: Stephen J. Dinsmore, 
Ames, IA; TEL: Thomas E. Labedz, Lincoln; TJW: T.J. Walker, Brady; TS: Teny 
Sohl, Brandon, SD; WF: William Flack, Madison; WM: Wayne Mollhoff, Ashland; 
WRS: W. Ross Silcock, Tabor, IA. 


SPECIES ACCOUNTS 

Greater White-fronted Goose: Unexpectedly late were 2 at LO 28 Dec (SJD) and 5 
at Desoto NWR 3 Jan (BB). First arrivals reported were in Gage and 
Lancaster Cos 26 Feb (WF); several hundred were between North Platte and 
York 27 Feb (AO). 

Snow Goose: Large numbers arrived “overnight” in cen.. Nebraska 20 Feb (JEt), 
with 2000 at Fairmont SL 20 Feb (JR) and 7000 at Harvard Marsh two days 
later (PD). 

Ross's Goose: Arrival was at the end of Feb. A dark morph bird photographed at 
Harvard Marsh 26 Feb (PD) was Nebraska's 5th record (http://ph.groups. 
yahoo.com/group/NEBirds/photos/browse/88e 1 ?b= 17&m=t&o=0). 

Cackling Goose: Wintering birds are most numerous in cen. and w. Nebraska; two 
in Sarpy Co 1 Jan (L&BP) and another (probably the resident bird) there 
1 Feb (WF), one at GPD 5 Jan (BFH), and one in Lancaster Co 28 Jan (LE) 
were easterly. Best count was an excellent 400 at Johnson Res 27 Dec 
(SJD). 

Canada Goose: Largest counts were 6381 on the Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec (fide AK) 
and 6100 at DeSoto NWR 3 Jan (BB). 

Trumpeter Swan: Traditional wintering areas in the Sandhills hold large numbers; 
a Nebraska Game and Parks survey 2 Jan found 100 on the Loup River and 
66 on Birdwood Creek (fide JGJ). Unusual were 5-10 at DeSoto NWR 
through the period; 10 were present 17 Jan, 31 Jan, and 7 Feb (BB). 

Wood Duck: Unusual mid-winter stragglers were 2-3 on Salt Creek in Lincoln 28 
Jan and 4 Feb (LE). There are only 18 reports 6 Jan-17 Feb. 

Gad wall: Over-wintering is unusual; candidates were 10 at GPD 20 Jan (RD), one 
in Sarpy Co 1 Feb (WF), and at least one at Scottsbluff SL 5 Feb (KD). 

American Wigeon: As with Gadwall, over-wintering is unusual; 1-2 were reported 
from Scottsbluff SL 5 Feb (KD), and Polk and Platte Cos 8 Feb (WF). 

Mallard: Best counts were 28,700 at DeSoto NWR 20 Dec (BB), 16,000 at 
Johnson Res 27 Dec (SJD), and 12,000 at Sutherland Res the same day 
(SJD). 

Northern Shoveler: The only mid-winter report was from Scottsbluff SL 5 Feb 
(KD); over-wintering is not expected away from the North Platte Valley. As 
many as 109 were still present for the Lincoln CBC 17 Dec, a record high 
(fide LRB), 

Northern Pintail: Routine reports. 

Green-winged Teal: A good mid-winter count was the 34-35 over-wintering on a 
spring-fed stream at FF 27 Jan-11 Feb (CNK). This species is often found in 
mid-winter. 

Canvasback: Rather late stragglers were 12 in Sarpy Co 10 Jan (CNK) and 5 in 
Lincoln 11 Jan (LE). Over-wintering is rare. 





£ 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol- 75 No. 1 


Redhead: Twelve in Lincoln 1 Jan, dwindling to 4 there on 11 Jan (LE), were late. 
Fewer than usual were reported for the period. 

Ring-necked Duck: Usually only casual in mid-winter away from the North Platte 
Valley, there were several reported. A male apparently over-wintering was on 
Salt Creek in Lincoln 28 Jan and 4 Feb (LE), 6 probable early arrivals were 
at a bubbler in Schuyler 7 Feb (WF), and singles were in Colfax Co 7 Feb 
(WF), and Polk and Platte Cos 8 Feb (WF). As with other diving ducks, 
spring arrival coincides with ice break-up, sometimes in early to mid-Feb. 

Greater Scaup: Unusually late for the location was one in Lincoln 9 Jan (JGJ). An 
excellent count was the 86 at LM as late as 27 Dec (SJD). 

Lesser Scaup: Rare mid-winter reports away from the North Platte Valley were 13 
in Scotts Bluff Co 9 Jan (KD), 2 in Sarpy Co 10 Jan (CNK), and 1-4 at 3 
locations in Lincoln 11 Jan-4 Feb (JGJ,LE). 

Black Scoter: A female/immature was at BOL 1 Dec (LE) for the only report. 

Bufflehead: A rare mid-winter report at the location was one in Scotts Bluff Co 26 
Jan (KK). 

Common Goldeneye: Best count was a moderate 669 at LM 28 Dec (SJD). 

Barrow’s Goldeneye: A female at Scottsbluff SL 27 Feb (KD) was at a regular 
wintering location. 

Hooded Merganser: Routine reports. 

Common Merganser: Best count was a relatively moderate 11,750 at LM 28 Dec 
(SJD). 

Red-breasted Merganser: Rather late, although at a regular wintering location for 
small numbers, were the 6 at LM 27 Dec (SJD). GPD may be a regular 
wintering site also: 3-9 were there 20-28 Jan (RD). 

Ruddy Duck: Rather late were 5 at Ogallala 27-28 Dec (SJD); the only report of a 
spring arrival was of one in Scotts Bluff Co 28 Feb (AK). 

Gray Partridge: The 4 west of Creighton 27 Jan were one of only 3 sightings in 
recent years (MB). No others were reported; numbers in the state are at a low 
currently. 

Ring-necked Pheasant: A large aggregation of 100-150 birds, about half males, 
was present in sw. Dixon Co during the last two weeks of Feb (JJ). 

Sharp-tailed Grouse: Routine reports. 

Greater Prairie-Chicken: Best counts were 100+ ne. of Brady 28 Jan (TJW) and 97 
in Boone Co 17 Jan (WM). 

Wild Turkey: Routine reports. 

Northern Bobwhite: Routine reports. 

Common Loon: Lingering very late were single juveniles at LM and Sutherland 
Res 27 Dec (SJD). 

Red-necked Grebe: A juvenile at LM 27-28 Dec (SJD) was rather late, and one of 
only about 30 fall records for the state. 

Western Grebe: Since the 1990s, over-wintering has occurred at LM or Sutherland 
Res; this winter “a few” were still at the latter location 7 Jan (TJW). 

Clark’s Grebe: One was at LM 28 Dec (SJD); there are only 3 later records, all at 
LM, two of which involved over-wintering. 

American White Pelican: Late away from favored wintering sites like Sutherland 
Res was one on the North Platte River in Lincoln Co 3 Jan (JGJ). Rather 
early was one at HCR 25 Feb (G&WH); wintering has occurred there. 

Double-crested Cormorant: A juvenile lingered at LM until 28 Dec (SJD); there are 
few later reports. 



Vol 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


7 


Great Blue Heron: Numbers are lowest in Jan; one at Lincoln 11 Jan (JM) was 
unexpected, although as many as 14 were still present for the CBC there 17 
Dec (fide LRB). 

Turkey Vulture: First reported was one rather early at Alliance 26 Feb (KK). 
Apparently Nebraska's first documented winter record, pending NOURC 
approval, was one near Gering 15 Jan (AK, LK, details). This was probably 
the same bird reported at the Riverside Zoo in Scottsbluff 11 Jan by the 
zoo's raptor specialist (fide AK). 

Bald Eagle: A total of IS northward migrants in 3 kettles were about on time over 
Sarpy Co 11 Feb (CNK). As is usual, an adult was incubating by 27 Feb in 
Loup Co (CH). 

Northern Harrier: An excellent count was 52 at the west end of LM 27 Dec (SJD). 
Seven were feeding on goose carcasses at Harvard Marsh 26 Feb (PD); this 
appears to be an unusual food item for harriers. 

Sharp-shinned Hawk: An excellent CBC tally was the 6 at S-BOL 16 Dec (fide 
JG). 

Cooper’s Hawk: The 4 on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec (fide JG) was a good count 

Northern Goshawk: The 2 reports, about the norm for a winter, were of singles 
near Scottsbluff 12 Dec (KD) and near North Platte 6 Jan (TJW). 

Red-shouldered Hawk: The only report was of one in e. Richardson Co 22 Feb 
(RE). NE reports are even fewer in winter than in summer, but with a recent 
“explosion of extra-limital reports” in KS (fide PJ), reports in NE might be 
expected to increase. 

Red-tailed Hawk: The 86 on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec (fide JG) was an excellent 
CBC total. A pair was finishing a nest near HCR 25 Feb (G&WH). 

Ferruginous Hawk: Routine reports. 

Rough-legged Hawk: A good CBC count was the 14 at Harrison 2 Jan (fide WM). 

Golden Eagle: Routine reports. 

American Kestrel: Routine reports. 

Merlin: Routine reports. 

Prairie Falcon: Easternmost were singles in Seward Co 12 Jan (JGJ) and Sarpy Co 
16 Feb (CNK). Although rare, a few occur in extreme e. NE each winter. 
Best count was 5-6 in Scotts Bluff Co 5 Feb (KD). 

Peregrine Falcon: The pair that nests on the Capitol Building at Lincoln may be 
resident; singles were seen 19 Jan (JGJ) and 21 Jan (GB), but 2 together 
were not seen until 26 Feb (GB). The Omaha pair, Zeus, in his 12th year, 
and Hera, in her 2nd, wintered in the vicinity (www.wtXKimeii.com/MconsJ . 

King Rail: One (unseen) near Brady 15 Dec was identified by its single “kek” calls, 
in contrast to the doubled “kek-kek” calls of Virginia Rail (TJW); if indeed 
it was this species, it would be the 2nd record in Dec for the state, the other 
was on 17 Dec near Lewellen. 

Virginia Rail: As has become expected, 2 were at LO 28 Dec (SJD). 

American Coot: A few will linger into mid-winter wherever non-moving open water 
occurs, usually spring-fed or aerated sites. Thus 73 were at Holmes L, 
Lincoln, 11 Jan, but a storm reduced the number to 2 by 15 Jan (LE). 
Similarly, a few were at Scottsbluff SL 5 Feb (KD), and 5 were at GPD 16 
Jan (MB). 




The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 1 


i 


Sandhill Crane: Last reported for foil was an adult rather late in Scotts Bluff Co 1 
Dec (AD); Dec records are surprisingly few. First returning birds were at 
Rowe Sanctuary by 5 Feb (fide RL); earliest are often seen in late Jan. Some 
1000 were in Hall Co by 22 Feb (PD) and 10,000 were between Chapman 
and Kearney 27 Feb, where “the season has started with a bang, not a 
trickle” (DK). 

Killdeer: Midwinter reports are expected at certain sites in the North Platte Valley, 
such as the 3 near Morrill 20 Jan (KD), but elsewhere, reports are few. Thus 
one in w. Douglas Co 4 Feb (DSt) was unusual. One or two had returned to 
Lancaster Co by 28 Feb (LE, JM). 

Greater Yellow legs: Only the 6th record mid-Jan to mid-Feb was one at LO 28 Dec 
(SJD; details). 

Baird's Sandpiper: One at PL in late Nov was seen again 1 Dec (LE), only the 4th 
Dec report for the state. 

Wilson's Snipe: Reports are fewest mid-Jan to mid-Feb; 2 were in Scotts Bluff Co 
15 Jan (KD) and another was near GPD 16 Jan (MB). 

Franklin's Gull: Singles appear in mid-winter on occasion, usually in alt 
plumage, and are probably very early migrants. Singles were at GPD 5 Jan 
in alt. plumage (BFH) and at BOL 12-15 Jan (LE), the 16th and 17th mid¬ 
winter records. 

Ring-billed Gull: Best count was 1200 at LM 27 Dec (SJD). 

California Gull: The 34 ads. still at LM 27-28 Dec (SJD) was a good count. Few 
remain into Jan, although over-wintering of a few birds is expected at LM. 
Surprising was the appearance of 30 with a group of 500+ Ring-billed Gulls 
at HCR 23 Feb; the observers lived for many years in Washington and are 
familiar with this species (G&WH, details). The sighting suggests some 
movement north-south within the Great Plains; there are fairly regular 
sightings of this species southward to Texas. 

Herring Gull: The 293 at LM 28 Dec was considered “fewer than usual” at that 
time (SJD). 

Thayer's Gull: The only reports were of one in Lincoln 30 Nov-1 Dec (JGJ,LE) and 
3 (2 ads. and a juv.) at LM 27-28 Dec (SJD). 

Glaucous-winged Gull: A gull photographed at LM 28 Dec looked very much like 
a juv. of this species, but also had some features reminiscent of Herring 
Gull; it thus was most likely an introgressant between the two species 
(SJD); a similar bird was photographed (not nearly as well!) at LO a few 
years ago (JGJ,WRS). 

Lesser Black-backed Gull: This now-regular migrant was reported at 3 sites: single 
adults were at LM 27-28 Dec (SJD), GPD 1 Jan (TS, photo), and BOL 5-12 
Jan (JGJ, m.ob.). The BOL bird is the latest ever, there are no records of 
over-wintering. 

Slaty-backed Gull: During the period that one was present at nearby L Manawa in 
Iowa, somewhat surprisingly only a single sighting from Nebraska was 
received, of a bird at Oflutt Base L, Sarpy Co, at 3 pm 21 Dec (RG). No 
details were provided Sightings were reported from L Manawa on 21 Dec 
before and after this sighting; the repent would be a first state record for 
Nebraska if accepted by the NOURC, 

Glaucous Gull: There were 3 reports involving 4 birds: a juv. was at BOL 10 Dec- 
12 Jan (LE, JGJ photo, m.ob.), another juv. was at LM 27-28 Dec (SJD), 
and two (un-aged) were at HCR 25 Feb (G&WH). 

Rock Pigeon: The 842 on the Ames CBC 3 Jan (D&JP) was among the highest 
CBC counts, most of which are from Lincoln. 




Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


2 . 


Eurasian Collared-Dove: The last county to record this species is Keya Paha; 4 
were there 18 Feb (WF). The state’s first record was at Shelton in 1997- 
Best counts were 88 on the Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec (fide AK), 46 on the 
Crawford CBC 3 Jan (B&DW), and 40 at Stapleton 28 Jan (TJW). Twigs 
were being gathered 23 Feb in a Sidney yard where 4 broods were raised last 
summer (AS). 

Mourning Dove: More than usual were noted in southern and eastern parts of the 
state, including 8 as far north as Norfolk on the CBC 23 Dec (fide DW), as 
well as 39 in Alma 6 Jan, 33 on the Ames CBC 3 Jan (D&JP), and 32 in 
the observers’ Bellevue yard 31 Jan (L&BP). Somewhat unusual were 2 near 
Doniphan 1 Feb (JEt) and 12 in Scotts Bluff Co 21 Dec (KD). 

Inca Dove: Only the 6th NE record was one at a Keystone feeder 28 Dec (SJD, 
photo). All 6 records have been of singles at feeders in winter. 

Barn Owl: Only the 8th record for Dec-Feb since 1976 was one photographed at LO 
28 Dec (SJD). Most depart by late Oct. 

Eastern Screech-Owl: Routine reports. 

Great Horned Owl: Routine reports. 

Snowy Owl: The only report was of a juv. female at LM 27-28 Dec (SJD, photo). 

Barred Owl: Somewhat westerly were 2 at Rock Creek Station, Jefferson Co, 18 
Feb (RE). 

Long-eared Owl: Best count was 14 on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec (LE, fide JG). 
One in deciduous woodland in Washington Co 9 Feb was considered 
unusual (JT). 

Short-eared Owl: An excellent count was the 17 at the west end of LM 27 Dec 
(SJD). An additional 7 reports of 11 birds were received, all from the Platte 
and Loup Valleys southward. 

Northern Saw-whet Owl: The only reports were of singles on the DeSoto-Boyer 
Chute CBC 23 Dec (WRS,EB) and the Norfolk CBC the same day (fide 
DW). 

Belted Kingfisher: Routine reports. 

Red-headed Woodpecker: One on the Norfolk CBC 23 Dec (fide DW) was 
northerly for the date. 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: Westernmost was one during Count Week on the 
Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec (fide AK). A few have established in Scotts Bluff 
Co in recent years. 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker: More than usual were found through the period in the 
southeast; about 8 in all. Westernmost were 2 males at Rock Creek Station, 
Jefferson Co, 18 Feb (RE). 

Downy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Hairy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Northern Flicker: Routine reports. 

Pileated Woodpecker: This species appears to be consolidating its fairly low 
numbers in the relatively limited habitat available in the lower Missouri 
Valley. One or two were reported from a regular location, FF and 
neighboring Haworth Park, Bellevue, through the period (CNK). Away from 
this area, one was in the Hummel Park, Omaha, area 8 Dec (fide JGr) and 
another was in Richardson Co 22 Feb (RE). 

Northern Shrike: An excellent CBC count was the 8 at S-BOL 16 Dec (fide JG). 

Loggerhead Shrike: Four were reported for the period, more than usual, although 
all were from the southeast, as expected. Singles were on the S-BOL CBC 
16 Dec, the 2nd in 14 years (fide JG), in Otoe Co 22 Dec (L&CF), in 
Lancaster Co 29 Jan (LE), and in Richardson Co 22 Feb (RE). 




ML 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 1 


Blue Jay: Routine reports. 

Pinyon Jay: None were reported. 

Clark’s Nutcracker: None were reported. 

Black-billed Magpie: Low numbers continue to be a concern; the species was 
missed on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec for only the 3rd time in 14 years (fide 
JG), and, even in the west, the 9 found on the Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec was 
the lowest tally since 1976 (fide ABC). 

American Crow: Routine reports. 

Horned Lark: After driving 103 miles on 16 Feb through windy, snow-covered 
countryside in Lancaster, Gage, and Saline Cos, the 1019 Homed Larks 
found were concentrated at 3 cattle feed lots in Saline Co (LE). This species 
is well-known for its attraction to bare ground in snowy conditions, usually 
along roadsides. 

Black-capped Chickadee: Some apparently good news for this species was this 
year’s Lincoln CBC tally of 79, up from 26, 27, and 56 in 2003-2005 (fide 
LRB). 

Tufted Titmouse: Routine reports. 

Red-breasted Nuthatch: Reports were consistent with an average, non-invasion 
winter for this species. 

White-breasted Nuthatch: Routine reports. 

Pygmy Nuthatch: Routine reports. 

Carolina Wren: Westernmost were two pairs, a pair wintering at each of 2 
locations in North Platte; they were still present 14 Feb (fide TJW). Other 
reports were from the east, north to Ames (D&JP). 

Winter Wren: Four CBCs, all in the southeast as expected, reported Winter Wrens: 
DeSoto NWR on 23 Dec (fide JT), Lincoln on 17 Dec (fide LRB), Omaha 
on 16 Dec (D&JP), and S-BOL on 16 Dec (fide JG). 

Marsh Wren: One was unexpected as far north as die GPD area 16 Jan (MB), while 
another on the LM CBC 28 Dec (SJD) continues regular CBC occurrences 
there. 

Golden-crowned Kinglet: The 10 on the Ames CBC 3 Jan (D&JP) was a good 
count for the date; even further north and west were 3 on the Beaver Valley 
CBC 28 Dec (D&CN) and 2 at LM 28 Dec (SJD). Wintering is expected 
only in the southeast. 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet: One on the Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec was the first there 
since 1966 (ABC); by Dec this species is rare away from the southeast. 

Eastern Bluebird: Recent years have seen this species becoming more conspicuous 
in late fell and early winter; thus noteworthy were 5 at Bridgeport in Feb 
(BCK), as many as 65 on the Ames CBC 3 Jan (D&JP), and a count high of 
143 on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec, where the 80 last year was the previous 
high (fide JG). 

Mountain Bluebird: Routine reports, 

Townsend’s Solitaire: Easternmost was one on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec (fide JG). 

Hermit Thrush: This species does not occur in Jan-Feb every year, and so the 5 
reports of 7 birds were a surprise. Probably the same bird was seen twice in 
a Lincoln yard 31 Jan and 24 Feb (RE), one was in Cedar Co 5 Feb (WF), 3 
were at FF 11 Feb (CNK), one was at Dodge Park, Omaha, 20 Feb (fide 
JT), and one was in Bellevue 22 Feb (EB). One on the Calamus CBC 23 
Dec was also unexpected (fide DH). 

American Robin: Routine reports. 

Varied Thrush: Three were reported, all in the southeast, including 2 different birds 
in Lancaster Co. One appeared in mid-Dec near Roca and was still present at 



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The Nebraska Bird Review 


11 


the end of the period (fide DL,LE), and the other was in Lincoln 15-25 Feb 
(JK, KL). A third was in Nebraska City for a few days up to and including 
23 Jan (L&CF, photo). These are only the 9th-11th records since 1991, out 
of a total of 37 for the state, but 6 of these have been reported 2005-2007. 

Northern Mockingbird: Over-wintering is rare, with fewest reports in Feb. 
However, one was in Lancaster Co 28 Feb (LE). The only other report was 
of one on the Lincoln CBC 17 Dec (fide LRB). 

Brown Thrasher: The only report was of one at a suet feeder on the S-BOL CBC 
16 Dec (fide JG). Dec reports in the southeast are not unusual. 

European Starling: Best CBC count was a moderate 7872 at Norfolk 23 Dec (fide 
DW); elsewhere, 4500 were at a cattle feedlot in Lancaster Co 28 Feb (LE). 

Bohemian Waxwing: The only reports were of a flock of 60 near Chadron 7-8 Feb 
and a smaller flock there 21 Feb (JF). 

Cedar Waxwing: Best count was 400 at Brady 23 Feb (TJW). 

Yellow-rumped Warbler: Other than a single female on the LM CBC 28 Dec 
(SJD), reports were from the southeast. There are few reports after mid-Jan 
and in Feb, and so surprising were the 4 reports of 6 birds 14 Jan-20 Feb: a 
female remained in the observer’s Bellevue yard 14 Jan-5 Feb (CNK), one 
was in Platte Co 4 Feb (LR,RH), two were in Lincoln 6 Feb (LE), and two 
were at Dodge Park, Omaha, 20 Feb (fide JT). These Feb reports are only 
the 13th-16th for the state. 

Pine Warbler: Two birds near North Platte 7 Dec were identified from the 
observer’s description as males of this species (TJW); this species is cold- 
tolerant for a wood-warbler, with at least 5 prior Dec reports. 

Spotted Towhee: Routine reports, 

American Tree Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Fox Sparrow: There are only 4 reports of over-wintering; latest fall dates are in Jan. 
Thus singles in Nebraska City 17 Feb (L&CF) and near Roca 23 Feb (CNK) 
were probably early migrants; there were 2 prior late Feb reports. 

Song Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Swamp Sparrow: Very rare in late Jan and in Feb, singles in Cass and Sarpy Cos 1 
Feb (WF) were thus of significance. 

White-throated Sparrow: Midwinter reports are rare, even in the southeast, and so 
of interest was one singing in Lincoln 26 Jan (TEL). A Bellevue feeder 
hosted at least one for most of the period except 11 Jan-12 Feb (L&BP). 

White-crowned Sparrow: Rare also in mid-winter, especially in the east, one was 
in Omaha 11 Jan (L&BP). Wintering is more usual in the west; some 19 
remained in a Mitchell yard through 15 Jan (KD). 

Harris’s Sparrow: Less common westward, 7 appeared at a North Platte feeder 8 
Jan after a month’s absence (TJW), 2 were at Wilsonville 18 Feb (LO), and 
two were at Keystone 28 Dec (SJD). 

Dark-eyed Junco: Best tally was the 940 on the S-BOL CBC 16 Dec, including 4 
“Oregon” Juncos (fide JG). Best easterly count of “Oregon” Juncos was the 
13 on the Lincoln CBC 16 Dec (fide LRB). The only “White-winged” 
Juncos reported were 2 on the Crawford CBC 3 Jan (B&DW) and one on the 
LM CBC 28 Dec (SJD); this form is uncommon in winter. 

Lapland Longspur: Best count was 1000 in Dodge Co 21 Feb, most flying 
northeast (D&JP). A single flock of 800 was in Lancaster Co 5 Jan (LE). 

Snow Bunting: More than usual were reported, including 36 on the LM CBC 28 
Dec (SJD), 21 on the Harrison CBC 2 Jan (WM), and a total of about 15 in 
cen. and e. Nebraska (m. ob.). 



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Northern Cardinal: A female wintered near Gering and another was counted on the 
Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec (AK); there is a small population in Scotts Bluff 
Co. First song reported was in Lincoln 25 Jan, 6 days earlier than the 
observer’s previous earliest (RE). 

Red-winged Blackbird: Wintering flocks are unusual, but several were noted: 300 
wintered near Gibbon (LR,RH), birds were present through the period in 
Scotts Bluff Co (AK), including a surprising 2000 there 25 Jan (RSg), and 
3000 were near Alma 19-25 Jan (G&WH), likely very early migrants. First 
“yard male” noted was in Fairmont 22 Feb (JR). 

Eastern Meadowlark: Routine reports. 

Western Meadowlark: First singing birds reported were in Lancaster Co 16 Feb 
(LE). A good mid-winter count was the 100+ in Washington Co 24 Jan 

an 

Yellow-headed Blackbird: Last reported was an adult male near Alma 23 Dec 
(G&WH). 

Rusty Blackbird: More than usual were reported, including an excellent CBC tally 
of 34 at S-BOL 16 Dec (fide JG). Other CBC reports were of 5 at Ponca SP 
23 Dec (fide BFH) and 6 at Norfolk the same day (fide DW). A few winter 
in the southeast; 2 were at an Ames-area feeder 4 Feb (D&JP), one was at 
Madison 6 Feb (WF), and 12 were at a Clatonia feedlot 16 Feb (LE). 

Brewer’s Blackbird: The only report of this rare winter visitor was of a single on 
the Lincoln CBC 17 Dec (LE). 

Common Grackle: Unexpected were the 60 near Alma 19 Jan, with 54 still there 8 
Feb (G&WH); wintering occurs in the south and east most years, but 
usually singles or very small groups. 

Great-tailed Grackle: Best count was the 80 near Alma l Dec (G&WH), while 
unexpected mid-winter reports were of 1-7 “hanging around Lincoln” 19 Jan- 
4 Feb (LE). 

Brown-headed Cowbird: Last were two rather northerly on the Norfolk CBC 23 
Dec (fide DW). Two males in Wayne Co 11 Feb (BFH) may have been early 
migrants or possibly wintered in or near Nebraska. 

Purple Finch: Numbers were generally low, although 21 were counted on the S- 
BOL CBC 16 Dec (fide JG). Elsewhere, about 15 were reported from the 
eastern half of the state (m. ob). The only report from the west, where rare, 
was of one near Mitchell 2 Dec (KD). 

House Finch: Routine reports. 

Red Crossbill: Routine reports. 

Common Redpoll: The only reports were of 9 at Boyer Chute NWR 23 Dec 
(EB,WRS), 2 on the LM CBC 28 Dec (SJD), 8 on the Harrison CBC 2 Jan 
(WJM), and singles at feeders in Winside 30 Jan (NB) and Lincoln 18 Feb 
(RE). 

Pine Siskin: Numbers were low except in the west, where 76 were counted on the 
Scottsbluff CBC 16 Dec (fide AK) and 50 were at Wildcat Hills NC 22 Feb 
(AK). Only about 20 were reported elsewhere (m. ob.). 

American Goldfinch: Best CBC count was the 705 at S-BOL 16 Dec (fide JG). 

House Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Eurasian Tree Sparrow: Potentially a first state record, one was photographed near 
Norfolk 3 Feb (MB) and again there 11 Feb (PR,BFH). This species has 
been gradually expanding northwestward in Iowa over the last few years; the 
nearest Iowa record is from Greene Co, in west-central Iowa. 



YflUi. No. 1 


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12 


HENSLOW’S SPARROW STATUS IN NEBRASKA 



Hens low's Sparrow habitat: Pawnee Prairie WMA, Pawnee County, Nebraska (Photo by 
Ross Silcock) Inset: Juvenile Henslow’s Sparrow (photo Powdermill Avian Research 
Center, used with permission) 


W. Ross Silcock 
P.O. Box 57 
Tabor, 1A 51653 
712-629-5865 
silcock@rosssi lcock.com 


Joel G. Jorgensen 

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission 

Lincoln, NE 68503 

402-471-5440 

joel.jorgensen@ngpc.ne.gov 







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The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 1 


Hen slow’s Sparrow (Ammodramus hemlowii ) is a grassland species of 
considerable conservation concern endemic to southern and eastern North America 
(Herkert et a I. 2002; Reinking 2002). Annual declines of about 7.5% from 1966 - 
2000 (Sauer et al. 2001) and the extirpation of breeding birds from large portions of 
the historic range have led to the sparrow being listed as a species of “Highest 
Concern” on the Partners in Flight National Watch List (PIFNWL: 
http://www.Dartnersinflight.org/cont p lan/PIF3 Part2WEB.pdfi. 

While the Henslow’s Sparrow is not listed as federally threatened or 
endangered, most species on this list are prime candidates for such consideration. 
The Nebraska Natural Legacy Plan (Schneider et al. 2005) considers the Henslow’s 
Sparrow a “Tier I At-Risk Species”. 

Henslow’s Sparrow is a rare but regular summer resident and breeder in 
southeast Nebraska (Sharpe et al. 2001). In the United States, the breeding range has 
apparently expanded northwestward in the last two decades (Herkert et al. 2002; 
Reinking 2002). Nebraska reports were few prior to 1990 and none were reported in 
the Nebraska Breeding Bird Atlas project 1984-89 (Mollhoff 2001). A set of eggs 
and a female were said to have been collected in Douglas County prior to 1900 
(Bruner et al. 1904), and there are 3 specimens in the University of Nebraska State 
Museum, all collected near Lincoln 26 Apr-18 May 1899-1920 (Sharpe et al. 2001). 
The only other published report prior to 1980 was of a singing male at Nine-Mile 
Prairie, Lancaster Co, 8 Jul 1951; no others were seen and no nesting evidence was 
found (Baumgarten 1953). 

Since the mid-1980s, however, Henslow’s Sparrows have been found with 
regularity in small numbers at several locations in southeastern Nebraska, notably 
Burchard Lake Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Pawnee County, Audubon 
Spring Creek Prairie in Lancaster County, Boyer Chute NWR in Washington 
County, University of Nebraska’s Allwine Prairie in Douglas County, Hall County 
sites owned by Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust and The Nature 
Conservancy, and Pawnee Prairie WMA in Pawnee County (Figure 1). 

The first singing male was found on the south side of Burchard Lake in 
Pawnee County 6 May 1985 (Wright 1985); this bird was photographed and seen by 
others through 31 May (Sharpe etal 2001). Since 1985, Henslow’s Sparrows have 
been reported from the Burchard Lake area, both within the WMA and on adjacent 
privately-owned land (Sullivan 2005); Sullivan found 27 singing birds on and 
around Burchard Lake WMA as well as a nest with 4 eggs on adjacent private land 
(Sullivan 2005). 

In Lancaster County, a singing Henslow’s Sparrow was found by Joseph 
Gubanyi in 1994 at Spring Creek Prairie, an Audubon Society-owned site near 
Denton (Silcock and Rosche 1994). Since then, a few Henslow’s Sparrows have been 
found there most years, although no breeding activity has been reported (Kevin 
Poague, pers. comm.). 

Beginning in 2000, singing birds were found in a restored prairie at Boyer 
Chute National Wildlife Refuge in Washington County (Jeny Toll, pers. comm.). 





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In Douglas County, 1-2 Henslow’s Sparrows have been found at the University of 
Nebraska at Omaha’s 65-hectare (160-acre) Allwine Prairie Preserve in northwest 
Omaha in 2004 and 2005 (John P. McCarty and L. LaReesa Wolfenbarger, pers. 
comm.). 


Farther west there are records of breeding birds on properties owned by the 
Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust and The Nature Conservancy in 
Hall County in the central Platte River Valley. Native grasslands are being restored 
and managed by rotational grazing and burning at these sites, with grassland bird 
species monitored at the Trust by Daniel Kim and for The Nature Conservancy by 
Chris Helzer. Beginning in 2004, Henslow’s Sparrows were found on Trust property 
consisting of tail-grass prairie remnants within a large area of grasslands (Kim 2005). 
At least one nest was found in 2004 (Kim 2005). In 2006, singing Henslow’s 
Sparrows were present on Trust property in May and dependent juveniles were seen 
later in the summer, numbers of singing birds increased through August (Dan Kim, 
pers. comm.). Nearby at the Caveny Tract owned by The Nature Conservancy, there 
have been multiple sightings 1995-2005 (Chris Helzer, pers. comm.; Kim 2005). 
Sullivan (2005) found $ singing birds in the southwest part of Pawnee Prairie WMA 
and 2 on adjacent private land in 2004. A nest was found at Pawnee Prairie also 
(Sullivan 2005). 



FIGURE 1. Current breeding distribution of the Henslow’s Sparrow in Nebraska. Shaded 
areas right (east) of line represent overall range. Dots are sites where Henslow’s Sparrow 
has been reported since 1990, including 1) Burchard Lake-Pawnee Prairie area. Pawnee 
County, 2) Audubon’s Spring Creek Prairie, 3) Whooping Crane Trust and Nature 
Conservancy properties. Hall County, 4) Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge, 
Washington County, and 5) Stanton County CRP tracts (Negus 2005). 


There are additional sightings from other locations, although these sites do 
not consistently support Henslow’s Sparrows. Searches by Concordia University 
professor Joseph Gubanyi and students from 1994-2000 yielded reports from near 
Bennet in Lancaster County 25 May 1994, at Meadowlark Lake WMA, Seward Co, 
each year (maximum 2 singing birds) 1997-2000, and at Redtail WMA, Butler 




































































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Vol. 75 No. 1 


County, 24 June 2000 (Sharpe et al 2001). The westernmost reports are sightings 
by Chris Helzer (pers. comm.) at The Nature Conservancy’s Willa Cather Prairie in 
Webster County, including 6 singing males there 4 Jun 1999. There are only 4 
records for the Rainwater Basin, all in June and July from Clay County, the first in 
1999 (J. Jorgensen, pers. obs.). 

Whether recent records indicate an increase in numbers and range of 
Henslow’s Sparrows in Nebraska or have resulted from increased searches for this 
species remains unknown, although, as noted above, this species appears to be 
expanding its range. The Henslow’s Sparrow is a species of considerable 
conservation concern and may easily go undetected even when present, so there is a 
clear need to monitor the species status in the state on a regular basis. 


ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

This study was funded by Nebraska Game and Parks with State Wildlife 
Grant money. 


LITERATURE CITED 

Baumgarten, H.E. “Henslow’s Sparrow at Lincoln.” The Nebraska Bird Review 21 
(1953): 25. 

Bruner, L., R.H. Wolcott, and M.H. Swenk. A Preliminary Review of the Birds of 
Nebraska, with Synopses, Omaha: Klopp and Bartlett, 1904. 

Herkert, J.R., P.D. Vickery, and D.E. Kroodsma. “Henslow’s Sparrow 
(Ammodramus henslowii )” The Birds of North America, No. 672 (A. Poole 
and F. Gill, eds.), Philadelphia, PA: The Birds of North America, Inc., 2002. 

Kim, D.H. “First Nebraska Nest Record for Henslow’s Sparrow.” The Prairie 
Naturalist 37 (2005): 171-173. 

Mollhoff, W.J. The Nebraska Breeding Bird Atlas 1984-1989. Nebraska 
Ornithologists’ Union Occ. Papers No. 7. Nebraska Technical Series No. 20. 
Lincoln: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2001. 

Reinking, D.L.. “A Closer Look: Henslow’s Sparrow.” Birding 
34(2002): 146-153. 

Sauer, J.R., J.E. Hines, and J. Fallon. The North American Breeding Bird Survey, 
Results and Analysis 1966*2000. Version 2001.2. Laurel, MD: Patuxent 
Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 2001. http://www.mbr- 
pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/bbs, html. 

Schneider, R., M. Humpert, K. Stoner, and G. Steinauer. The Nebraska Natural 
Legacy Project. Lincoln: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2005. 

Sharpe, R.S., W.R. Silcock, and J.G. Jorgensen. The Birds of Nebraska, Their 
Distribution and Temporal Occurrence. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 
Press, 2001. 

Silcock, W.R., and R.C. Rosche. “Spring Field Report, March-May, 1994.” The 
Nebraska Bird Review 62 (1994): 66-88. 

Sullivan, S. Ecological Community Inventory - BCR 22. Summary Report for 2004 
Field Season. Lincoln: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2005. 

Wright, R.. “Henslow’s Sparrow.” The Nebraska Bird Review 53 (1985): 43-44. 



Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


12 


2006-2007 Christmas Bird Counts in Nebraska 

Despite snow and ice storms which forced postponement of several counts 
and prevented participation by a number of birders, all 14 counts which were held 
last winter took place again this winter. The total number of species (131) was two 
more than last year's 129, and the total number of individuals was 177,590, down 
some 30,000. 

Waterfowl numbers were about normal Canada Goose numbers were down 
16,000 from last year, but this is a number which fluctuates on that scale from year 
to year. Northern Pintails are becoming more abundant on Christmas Counts. Their 
tallies in the early 1990s were in the single digits, last year's count was 96, and this 
year 146 were counted, highest since 157 in 1966. 

Great Blue Herons hit an all-time high this year with 42 tallied, 14 of those 
on the Lincoln count. Likewise Northern Harriers were counted in record numbers 
this year: 106 was this year's count and the previous high was 103 in 1994. Red¬ 
tailed Hawks have been increasing during every decade since the 1960s. The average 
number seen on Christmas counts in the 1960s was 32, in the 1970s the average was 
81, in the 1980s it was 208, in the 1990s it was 250, and from 2000 to 2005 it was 
373. This year's count of 542 was an all-time high. 

Unusual birds this year included the Greater Yellowlegs at Lake 
McConaughy, only once previously recorded on a Christmas count in 1993 at the 
same location, and the Slaty-backed Gull at Omaha. The second-ever Inca Dove was 
found on the Lake McConaughy count; one was counted in 1987 in Kearney. Other 
doves continue to increase in numbers: Eurasian Collared-Doves were unsurprisingly 
at an all-time high of 296, and the Mourning Dove tally of 394 was the 5th-highest 
count. 


Seven owl species were counted, despite the fact that Short-eared Owls were 
missed altogether. The Bam Owl at McConaughy was only the 4th on a Christmas 
count, and the Snowy at the same location was only the 7th record, including count 
week birds in 1976 and 1980. The two Northern Saw-whet Owls (DeSoto and 
Norfolk) tied the previous high count (McConaughy in 2000). The 14 Long-eared 
Owls at Branched Oak-Seward contributed to the total of 20, 5th-highest count. 

Good numbers of Belted Kingfishers were found: 47, 13 of which were on 
the Lincoln count. Red-bellied Woodpeckers also were abundant; 416, second only 
to last year's 433, Only 3 Red-headed Woodpeckers were found; their average count 
since 2000 is 35. The Black-billed Magpie tally (39) was the lowest since 1967. 
American Crows were scarce, too, despite the 1840 counted at Calamus. This year's 
total of 3079 is low compared to die average of 7133 since 2000, 

Black-capped Chickadee numbers are now in a more normal historical range 
statewide, although they have not recovered to their pre-2003 levels at several central 
Nebraska counts. They were missed entirely at Calamus, where their pre-2003 
average was 62, and only 3 were found at Grand Island, where their pre-2003 average 
was 101. 





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Vol. 75 No. 1 


White-breasted Nuthatches were at an all-time high of 858, with 229 of those 
counted at Omaha. Carolina Wrens also appeared to be having a good year. The 
total of 47 (on 5 counts) was an all time high count. Just the 22 seen at Omaha 
would have been an all time high. More Eastern Bluebirds (397) were counted than 
ever before while American Robins (3793) were at their lowest in 10 years. 

Last year's all-time high count of Snow Buntings (31) was easily eclipsed 
this year with 61, seen at Calamus, Harrison and Lake McConaughy, Northern 
Cardinals crept up to a new high count of 913, missed only at Crawford and 
Harrison. 


2006-07 CBC Participants 

Ames Joe Gubanyi, Clem Klaphake, Steve Lamphere, Jeanne Miller, Wayne 
MollhofF, Elizabeth Mulliken, Jerry Mulliken, Don Paseka (compiler), Janis Paseka, 
Neal Ratzlaff, Carolyn Sonderman, Jerry Toll (12) 

Beaver Valley Mitzi Fox, Wayne Mollhoff, Colleen Noecker, Don Noecker 
(compiler), Don Paseka, Janis Paseka, Elsie Wheeler (7) 

Branched Oak- Seward Alex DeGarmo, Kevin DeGarmo, Paul Dunbar, Rick Eades, 
Larry Einemann, Joseph Gubanyi (compiler), Robin Harding, Joel Jorgensen, Robert 
Kaul, Vince Kingston, Thomas E. Labedz, John Quinn, Lanny Randolph, Sarah 
Rehme, Mary Steinbeck, Shane Tucker, Bill Wells, Gertrude Wood (18) 

Calamus-Loup Ben Brogie, Mark Brogie, Robin Harding, David Heidt (compiler), 
Lanny Randolph, Duane Wolff (6) 

Crawford Kathy DeLara, Phyllis Drawbaugh, John Flavin, Ruben Siegfried, Bruce 
Walgren (compiler), Donna Walgren Feeder Watcher: Marilee Cargill (6 + 1 feeder 
watcher) 

DeSoto Bob Barry (compiler), Elliott Bedows, Laurine Blankenau, Dave Crawford, 
Nelli Falzgraf, Betty Grenon, Jason Grundman, Suzanne Gucciardo, Steve 
Lamphere, Sue Mattix, Jim Meyer, Rosalie Noteman, Molly O'Dell, Tom O'Dell, 
Don Paseka, Janis Paseka, Dawn Price, Ross Silcock, Greg Stoiber, Jon Strong, 
Jerry Toll, Betty Young (22) 

Grand Island Gordon Backer, Anton Curtis, Blake Hatfield, Ann Kruse, Ron 
Kruse, Ray Kusek, Connie McCartney (compiler), Jim Meyer, Steve Morris, 
Patricia Smith, Vem Throop Feeder Watchers: Kathy Aubushon, Jim Etherton, 
Lewis Hilligas (11+3 feeder watchers) 

Harrison. Wayne Mollhoff (compiler), Bruce Walgren, Donna Walgren (3) 

Lake McConaughy Stephen J. Dinsmore (compiler). Bill Huntley, Rodger Knaggs 

(3) 



Vol.75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


19 


Lincoln Irene Alexander, Sue Allen, Linda R. Brown (compiler), Jackie Canterbury, 
Barbara DiBemard, James Eades, Rick Eades, Larry Einemann, Joe Gubanyi, 
Matthew Hansen, Paul Johnsgard, Tim Knott, Josef Kren, Thomas E. Labedz, 
Daniel Leger, Linda Maslowski, Pete Maslowski, John Miller, Kathy Putensen, 
Juan Ramirez, Ken Reitan, Jules Russ, Laura Safarik, Charles Spence, Leo Spence, 
Brooke Stansberry, Moni Usasz (27) 

Norfolk Joyce Borgelt, Norma Brockmoller, Ben Brogie, Ed Brogie, Mark Brogie, 
Donna Christiansen, Joyce Eucker, Darlene Finkhouse, David Heidt, Tony Jacobsen, 
Kyle Knedsen, Lyla Koehlmoos, Tyler Sherman, Matt Stanley, Jan Uttecht, Clayton 
Wainstad, Duane Wolff (compiler), Bonnie Wylie (18) 

Omaha Elliott Bedows, Laurine Blankenau, David Crawford, Fritz Davis, Nelli 
Falzgraf, Bob Fuchs, Betty Grenon (compiler), Suzanne Gucciardo, Maria Hicks, 
Clem Klaphake, Jim Kovanda, Sandy Kovanda, Catherine Kuper, Steve Lamphere, 
Urban Lehner, Sue Mattix, Rosalie Noteman, Babs Padelford, Loren Padelford, Don 
Paseka, Janis Paseka, Willard Piercy, Dick Rasmussen, Neal Ratzlaff, Kelly Rezac, 
Jean Richter, Kathleen Rose, Rick Schmid, Eric Scholar, Vicki Scoville, David 
Smith, Greg Stoiber, Penny Zahurones (33) 

Ponca Chris Anderson, Bill Bossman, Bill Brown, Warren Dunkel, Pat Dunn, Jeff 
Fields, Art Huser, Bill Huser (compiler), Jan Johnson, Luke Johnson, Richard 
Johnson, Jerry Probst, Jerry Von Ehwegen (13) 

Scottsblujf Kathy DeLara, Dean Drawbaugh, Phyllis Drawbaugh, Ann Duey, 
Michelle Hoff, Helen Hughson, Alice Kenitz (compiler), Ed Newbury, Bonnie 
Schoen, Ruben Siegfried (10) 



2Q. 


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Vol- 75 No. 1 


2006-2007 Christmas Bird Counts 



Ames 

Beaver Valley 

Branched Oak-Seward 

Calamus-Loup 

Crawford 

DeSoto-Boyer 

Grand Island 

Harrison 

Gr. White-fronted Goose 






1 


Snow Goose 




1 


1,064 

5 


Ross's Goose 






6 



Cackling Goose 



142 

6 


20 

70 


Canada Goose 

2,262 


439 

2,260 


2,304 

5,100 


Trumpeter Swan 






8 



Wood Duck 









Gadwall 

cw 


3 

7 


2 



American Wigeon 



3 



5 



Mallard 

5,310 

481 

544 

3,550 

79 

25,008 

1,631 


Northern Shoveler 







50 


Northern Pintail 



2 






Green-winged Teal 




30 





Canvasback 

cw 








Redhead 




2 





Ring-necked Duck 

cw 



2 


1 



Greater Scaup 









Lesser Scaup 

cw 



1 





Bufflehead 




1 





Common Goldeneye 

5 


194 

170 


126 

22 


Hooded Merganser 



1 

4 





3 

1 

1 


137 

1,700 


246 



Red-breasted Merganser 


1 






Ruddy Duck 









Ring-necked Pheasant 

16 

16 

16 

6 

25 

16 

4 


Sharp-tailed Grouse 




20 





Greater Prairie-Chicken 

1 


41 





Wild Turkey 

11 

1 

16 

62 

80 

259 

111 

52 

Northern Bobwhite 



41 



9 

25 


Common Loon 




















































































Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


21 


2006-2007 Christmas Bird Counts 



Lake McConaughy 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

Omaha 

Ponca State Park 

Scottsbluff 

Total 

Gr. White-fronted Goose 

2 






3 

Snow Goose 

3 

1 


17 

320 

4 

1,415 

Ross's Goose 







6 

Cackling Goose 

281 

55 

6 

cw 


56 

636 

Canada Goose 

5,818 

3,293 

490 

1,827 

593 

6,381 

30,767 

Trumpeter Swan 






cw 

8 

Wood Duck 


2 





2 

Gadwall 

57 

9 


7 


18 

103 

American Wigeon 

8 



cw 


355 

371 

Mallard 

1,459 

815 

1,673 

660 

2,211 

8,123 

51,544 

Northern Shoveler 


109 


1 


2 

162 

Northern Pintail 

6 

3 


2 


133 

146 

Green-winged Teal 

107 

7 


44 


28 

216 

Canvasback 




cw 


1 

1 

Redhead 

1 

8 




2 

13 

Ring-necked thick 

6 

1 

1 

cw 


37 

48 

Greater Scaup 

78 





1 

79 

Lesser Scaup 

225 

4 


1 


8 

239 

Bufllehead 

34 

4 





39 

Common Goldeneye 

669 

25 

3 

108 

4 

508 

1,834 

Hooded Merganser 

5 

6 


7 


6 

29 

Common Merganser 

11,754 

7 


104 

17 


13,966 

Red-breasted Merganser 

4 






5 

Ruddy Duck 

3 





1 

4 

Ring-necked Pheasant 

10 

21 

21 

1 

10 

2 

164 

Sharp-tailed Grouse 

3 






23 

Greater Prairie-Chicken 

18 






60 

Wild Turkey 

41 


33 

301 


10 

977 

Northern Bobwhite 



3 

12 



90 

Common Loon 

cw 
































































22. 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol- 75 No. 1 


2006-2007 Christinas Bird Counts 



Ames 

| Beaver Valley 

[ Branched Oak-Seward 

Calamus-Loup 

Crawford 

i 

DeSoto-Boyer 

Grand Island 

1 

Pied-billed Grebe 









Red-necked Grebe 









Western Grebe 









Clark’s Grebe 









American White Pelican 






1 


Double-crested Cormorant 








Great Blue Heron 

5 


1 



2 

4 


Bald Eagle 

18 

11 

10 

15 

1 

36 

3 


adult 

12 





27 

3 


immature 

6 




1 

9 



unspecified age 


11 

10 

15 





Northern Harrier 

4 

7 

29 

4 

2 

9 

8 


Sharp-shinned Hawk 

2 


6 

1 


3 



Cooper's Hawk 

1 


4 

1 

1 

3 

2 


Northern Goshawk 






1 



Accipiter sp. 









Red-tailed Hawk 

45 

21 

86 

11 

4 

117 

28 


Ferruginous Hawk 







1 

I 

Rough-legged Hawk 


1 

4 

1 



5 

14 

Buteo sp. 



2 






Golden Eagle 






1 


1 

American Kestrel 

13 

4 

10 

2 

7 

23 

12 

cw 

Merlin 



1 

1 

1 

1 



Prairie Falcon 



1 


1 




falcon sp. 









hawk sp. 



1 






Virginia Rail 









American Coot 







8 


Killdeer 







1 


Greater Yellowlegs 























































































Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


22 


2006-2007 Christmas Bird Counts 



Lake McConaughy 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

Omaha 

Ponca State Park 

fc 

3 

1 

1 

1 

Total 

Pied-billed Grebe 


1 


1 



2 

Red-necked Grebe 

1 






1 

Western Grebe 

38 






38 

Clark's Grebe 

1 






1 

American White Pelican 

2 



cw 



3 

Double-crested Cormorant 

1 



1 



2 

Great Blue Heron 

8 

14 

1 

2 

1 

4 

42 

Bald Eagle 

53 


32 

24 

14 

5 

222 

adult 






4 

46 

immature 






1 

17 

unspecified age 

53 


32 

24 

14 


159 

Northern Harrier 

12 

6 

4 

3 

13 

5 

106 

Sharp-shinned Hawk 


9 

4 

5 

3 

3 

36 

Cooper's Hawk 


3 

1 

1 

1 


18 

Northern Goshawk 







1 

Accipiter sp. 


6 

2 

1 



9 

Red-tailed Hawk 

22 

39 

40 

76 

50 

3 

542 

Ferruginous Hawk 

1 






3 

Rough-legged Hawk 

1 

1 

2 


14 

2 

45 

Buteosp. 


3 





5 

Golden Eagle 







2 

American Kestrel 

13 

17 

33 

14 

17 

21 

186 

Merlin 

1 

1 

2 




8 

Prairie Falcon 







2 

falcon sp. 




1 



1 

hawk sp. 






1 

2 

Virginia Rail 

2 






2 

American Coot 

10 

66 


4 


49 

137 

Killdeer 

8 

2 





11 

Greater Yeflowlegs 

1 






1 





































































24 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 1 


2006-2007 Christinas Bird Counts 



Ames 

Beaver Valley 

Branched Oak-Seward 

Calamus-Loup 

Crawford 

DeSoto-Boyer 

Grand Island 

Harrison 

Wilson's Snipe 


1 


6 




1 

Ring-billed Gull 



272 

50 


1 



California Gull 









Herring Gull 



47 

2 





Thayer's Gull 









Lesser Black-backed Gull 








Slaty-backed Gull 









Glaucous Gull 









gull sp. 




200 





Rock Pigeon 

842 

63 

190 

7 

99 

389 

116 

5 

Eur. Collared-Dove 

9 

18 

26 

30 

46 

14 

4 

10 

Mourning Dove 

33 


11 



63 

13 


Inca Dove 









Bam Owl 









Eastern Screech-Owl 


2 

3 

2 

1 

2 

11 

2 

Great Homed Owl 

4 

3 

7 



1 

1 

3 

Snowy Owl 









Barred Owl 

1 


3 



11 



North. Saw-whet Owl 






1 



Long-eared Owl 



14 




2 


Belted Kingfisher 

5 



3 


2 

4 


Red-head. Woodpecker 








Red-bell. Woodpecker 

34 

5 

65 



51 

11 


Yellow-bell. Sapsucker 


1 






Downy Woodpecker 

32 

19 

63 

4 

8 

82 

13 

1 

Hairy Woodpecker 

12 

1 

18 

4 

4 

8 

3 

2 

Northern Flicker 

58 

15 

91 

18 

1 

165 

38 


Loggerhead Shrike 



1 






Northern Shrike 



8 

5 

6 


1 

1 

Blue Jav 

17 

3 

146 

2 

4 

66 

24 
























































































Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


21 


2006-2007 Christmas Bird Counts 



Lake McConaughy 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

Omaha 

Ponca State Park 

Scottsbluff 

Total 

Wilson's Snipe 

1 


5 




14 

Ring-billed Gull 

890 

65 


43 


1 

1,322 

California Gull 

27 






27 

Herring Gull 

293 






342 

Thayer's Gull 

4 






4 

Lesser Black-backed Gull 

1 






1 

Slaty-backed Gull 




1 



1 

Glaucous Gull 

1 






1 

gull sp. 







200 

Rock Pigeon 

7 

737 

423 

672 

106 

250 

3,906 

Eurasian Collared-Dove 

51 





88 

296 

Mourning Dove 

6 

190 

8 

64 

6 


394 

Inca Dove 

1 






1 

Bam Owl 

1 






1 

Eastern Screech-Owl 

1 

2 

5 


1 

3 

35 

Great Homed Owl 

2 

9 

8 

1 

4 

1 

44 

Snowy Owl 

1 






1 

Barred Owl 


3 


5 

1 


24 

North. Saw-whet Owl 



1 




2 

Long-eared Owl 

I 


1 


2 


20 

Belted Kingfisher 

2 

13 

4 

7 

3 

4 

47 

Red-headed Woodpecker 


1 

1 

1 



3 

Red-bellied Woodpecker 

2 

50 

17 

152 

29 

cw 

416 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 




1 



2 

Downy Woodpecker 

13 

112 

42 

122 

29 

10 

550 

Hairy Woodpecker 

6 

12 

9 

22 

8 

2 

111 

Northern Flicker 

13 

24 

16 

85 

31 

27 

582 

Loggerhead Shrike 







1 

Northern Shrike 

1 

3 

4 


2 

1 

32 

Blue Jay 

14 

190 

17 

52 

1 

34 

570 



























































26 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


VoL 75 No. 1 


2006-2007 Christinas Bird Counts 



Ames 

Beaver Valley 

Branched Oak-Seward 

Calamus-Loup 

Crawford 

| DeSoto-Boyer 

Grand Island 

Harrison 

Black-billed Magpie 





11 


3 


American Crow 

24 

15 

403 

1,840 

46 

244 

24 

60 

Homed Lark 

38 

200 

73 

6 

79 

34 

125 

53 

Bl.-capped Chickadee 

61 

10 

47 


62 

206 

3 

9 

Tufted Titmouse 






8 



Red-breasted Nuthatch 

2 


7 



3 

1 

2 

White-br. Nuthatch 

57 

47 

60 


5 

107 

152 

4 

Pygmy Nuthatch 





10 



20 

Brown Creeper 

2 

3 

6 



2 

1 


Carolina Wren 

7 


2 



2 



Winter Wren 



1 



1 



Marsh Wren 









Golden-cr. Kinglet 

10 

3 

13 

4 


14 

4 


Ruby-crowned Kinglet 









Eastern Bluebird 

65 


143 

1 


83 

32 


Townsend's Solitaire 



1 


2 



2 

Hermit Thmsh 




1 





American Robin 

493 

157 

531 

220 


95 

146 

5 

Northern Mockingbird 









Brown Thrasher 



1 






European Starling 

3,357 

336 

1,180 

44 

154 

1,960 

U82 

56 

Cedar Waxwing 

86 

243 

351 

11 


97 

49 


Yellow-rump. Warbler 

1 


6 




1 


Spotted Towhee 









American Tree Sparrov 

68 

94 

712 

126 

113 

484 

82 

37 

Field Sparrow 







3 


Fox Sparrow 

1 


3 






Song Sparrow 

3 

1 

13 

1 


10 

3 

1 

White-throat. Sparrow 

1 


1 






Harris' Sparrow 

5 

2 

92 



51 

7 
































































Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


21 


2006-2007 Christmas Bird Counts 



Lake McConaughy 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

Omaha 

| Ponca State Park 

Scottsbluff 

Total 

Black-billed Magpie 

16 





9 

39 

American Crow 

1 

70 

43 

216 

74 

19 

3,079 

Homed Lark 

76 

2 

63 



120 

869 

Blade-capped Chickadee 

7 

79 

31 

364 

93 

10 

982 

Tufted Titmouse 




34 



42 

Red-breasted Nuthatch 


11 

7 

1 


1 

35 

White-breasted Nuthatch 

2 

97 

55 

229 

42 

1 

858 

Pygmy Nuthatch 







30 

Brown Creeper 


24 

2 

13 

1 


54 

Carolina Wren 


14 


22 



47 

Winter Wren 


1 


1 



4 

Marsh Wren 

1 






1 

Golden-crowned Kinglet 

2 

34 


4 



88 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 






l 

1 

Eastern Bluebird 


7 


54 

12 


397 

Townsend's Solitaire 

15 





5 

25 

Hermit Thrush 







1 

American Robin 

203 

33 

16 

354 

1,156 

384 

3,793 

Northern Mockingbird 


1 





1 

Brown Thrasher 







1 

European Starling 

370 

5,679 

7,872 

6,500 

830 

1,764 

31,384 

Cedar Waxwing 

24 

60 

50 

165 

74 

17 

1,227 

Yellow-rum ped Warbler 

1 



2 



11 

Spotted Towhee 


5 





5 

American Tree Sparrow 

107 

448 

550 

441 

171 

2 

3,435 

Field Sparrow 







3 

Fox Sparrow 


1 





5 

Song Sparrow 

12 

11 

4 

17 


2 

78 

White-throated Sparrow 


29 


5 



36 

Harris' Sparrow 

2 

11 

24 

39 



233 



































































22. 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 1 


2006-2007 Christinas Bird Counts 



Ames 

Beaver Valley 

Branched Oak-Seward 

a. 

| 

3 

3 

Crawford 

& 

1 

s 

Grand Island 

Harrison 

White-crowned Sparrow 



1 





Dark-eyed Junco 

250 

155 

940 

188 

74 

910 

197 

48 

Slate-colored 



276 


29 




Oregon 



4 


21 



3 

White-winged 





2 




Pink-sided 





3 




unspecified subsp. 

250 

155 

660 

188 

19 

910 

197 

45 

Lapland Longspur 


1 

53 



2 

15 


Snow Bunting 




4 




21 

Northern Cardinal 

30 

6 

134 

4 


148 

31 


Red-winged Blackbird 

300 


203 

3 

34 

21 

91 


Western Meadowlark 

24 




1 

1 



meadowlark sp. 

26 


35 

1 


60 

6 


Rusty Blackbird 



34 






Brewer's Blackbird 









Common Grackle 

1 


1 




24 


Great-tailed Grackle 









Brown-headed Cowbird 








blackbird sp. 


1 







Purple Finch 

2 

3 

21 



1 



House Finch 

4 

34 

114 

28 

12 

13 

77 


Common Redpoll 






9 


8 

Red Crossbill 





6 




Pine Siskin 



4 


14 




American Goldfinch 

144 

186 

705 

91 

191 

216 

79 

54 

House Sparrow 

365 

71 

451 

28 

205 

293 

163 

56 



















TOTAL SPECIES 

51 

39 

73 

56 

35 

65 

60 

28 

TOTAL INDIVIDUAL 

14,167 

2,241 

9,001 

10,834 

1,389 

35,201 

9,934 

529 









































































Vol- 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


22 


2006-2007 Christinas Bird Counts 



Lake McConaughy 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

Omaha 

Ponca State Park 

Scottsbluff 

Total 

White-crowned Sparrow 

1 





3 

5 

Dark-eyed Junco 

318 

859 

275 

755 

227 

102 

5,298 

Slate-colored 

109 

158 


755 


13 

1,340 

Oregon 

26 

13 




18 

85 

White-winged 

1 






3 

Pink-sided 

25 





2 

30 

unspecified subspecies 

157 

688 

275 


227 

69 

3,840 

Lapland Longspur 

43 






114 

Snow Bunting 

36 






61 

Northern Cardinal 

22 

212 

29 

258 

38 

1 

913 

Red-winged Blackbird 

8 

1 

86 

250 

429 

1,111 

2,537 

Western Meadowlark 







26 

meadowlark sp. 

21 

3 

62 

25 


cw 

239 

Rusty Blackbird 



6 


5 


45 

Brewer's Blackbird 


1 





1 

Common Grackle 


cw 

5 




31 

Great-tailed Grackle 


1 





1 

Brown-headed Cowbird 


1 

2 




3 

blackbird sp. 







1 

Purple Finch 




6 



33 

House Finch 

100 

166 

54 

63 

19 

239 

923 

Common Redpoll 

2 






19 

Red Crossbill 







6 

Pine Siskin 

6 

2 

3 


1 

76 

106 

American Goldfinch 

77 

298 

160 

216 

34 

400 

2,851 

House Sparrow 

204 

606 

331 

775 

130 

234 

3,912 

















TOTAL SPECIES 

90 

73 

55 

64 

44 

59 

131 

TOTAL INDIVIDUALS 

23.783 

14,716 

12.642 

15.262 

6.827 

20.691 

177.217 

































































2006-07 CBC Site Data 



Date 

Species 

Individuals 

Observers 

Low Temp High Temp 

Sky (am/pm) 

Precip 

Ames 

3 Jan 07 

51 

14,167 

12 

26 

42 

clear 

none 

Beaver Valley 

28 Dec 

39 

2,241 

7 

26 

36 

cloudy 

none 

Branched Oak/Seward 

16 Dec 

73 

9,001 

18 

34 

51 

cloudy 

none 

Calamus-Loup 

23 Dec 

56 

10,834 

6 

10 

30 

partly cloudy 

none 

Crawford 

3 Jan 07 

35 

1,389 

6+ 1 

26 

36 

mostly cloudy 

none 

DeSoto-Boyer 

23 Dec 

65 

35,201 

22 

28 

43 

cloudy 

none 

Grand Island 

16 Dec 

60 

9,934 

11+3 

36 

52 

cloudy 

none 

Harrison 

2 Jan 07 

28 

529 

3 

16 

46 

partly cloudy 

none 

Lake McConaughy 

28 Dec 

90 

23,783 

3 

27 

34 

clear/partly cloudy 

none 

Lincoln 

17 Dec 

73 

14,716 

27 

22 

42 

partly cloudy 

none 

Norfolk 

16 Dec 

55 

12,642 

18 

38 

51 

cloudy/partly cloudy 

none 

Omaha 

16 Dec 

64 

15,262 

33 

38 

52 

fog/partly cloudy 

none 

Ponca S.P. 

23 Dec 

44 

6,827 

13 

26 

37 

cloudy/clear 

none 

Scottsbluff 

16 Dec 

59 

20,691 

10 

31 

43 

partly cloudy 

none 


Total 131 177,217 189 + 4 


Additional observer numbers at Crawford and Grand Island are feeder watchers. 


The Nebraska Bird Review _ VoL 75 No. 1 



Vol. 75 No. 1 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


11 


The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska 
Ornithologists’ Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in 
arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $15 in the 
United States, $1$ in Canada and $30 in all other countries, payable in advance. 
Single copies are $4 each, postpaid, in the United States, $5 in Canada, and $8 
elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Lou Pritchard, NOU Librarian, c/o 
University of Nebraska State Museum, W-436 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588- 
0514. 

Memberships in the NOU (on a calendar-year basis only): Active, $15; 
Sustaining, $25; Student, $10; Family Active, $20; Family Sustaining, $30; Life, 
$250. Send dues and subscription requests to Betty Grenon, NOU Treasurer, (see 
address below) Contributions to the NOU are tax deductible. 

Send manuscripts and notes on bird sightings to Jams Paseka, Editor, (see 
address below) Send quarterly bird reports to Ross Silcock. (see address below) 


President and Newsletter Editor. Dave Heidt, 1703 Hilltop Drive, Norfolk, NE 
68701-2031; daveh@northeastcollege.com 

Vice-President : Urban Lehner, 15526 Pierce Circle, Omaha, NE 68144; 
urbanity@hotmail.com 

Secretary : Kevin Poague, 379 S. 46th St., Lincoln, NE; kpoague@audubon.org 

Treasurer : Betty Grenon, 1409 Childs Road East, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
grenon925@aol.com 

Librarian : Mary Lou Pritchard, 6325 O Street #515, Lincoln, NE 68510 

Directors : 

Jan Uttecht, Box 823, Stanton, NE 68779; jautek@stanton.net (2007) 

Loren Padelford, 1405 Little John Road, Bellevue, NE 68005; 

Ipdlfrd@juno.com (2008) 

Steve Lamphere, 3101 Washington St., Apt. 98, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
kingfisher65@aol.com (2009) 

Records Committee Chairman : Mark Brogie, Box 316, Creighton, NE 68729; 
mbrogie@esul.org 

Editor of The Nebraska Bird Review: Janis Paseka, 1585 Co. Rd. 14 Blvd., Ames, 
NE 68621; paseka76@gmail.com 

Occurrence Report Compiler : Ross Silcock, P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653; 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 

Breeding. Bird AdaaJEoto and Nest Records Coordinator Wayne Moiihoff, 

2354 Euclid St., Ashland NE 68003; wmollhofr@netscape.net 

NOU Website : http://rip.physics.unk.edu/NOU/ 


Nebraska Birdline : c/o Josef Kren 402-721-5487, ext. 6490, or 
800-642-8382, ext. 6490, or birdsne@yahoo.com 










Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc. 

3745 Garfield 

Lincoln, NE 68506-1028 


Address Service Requested 

Table of Contents 

NOU Annual Treasurer's Report for 2006. 

Winter Field Report, Dec. 2006 - Feb. 2007 by W. Ross Silcock 

Henslow's Sparrow Status in Nebraska 

by W. Ross Silcock and Joel G. Jorgensen. 

2006*2007 Christmas Bird Counts in Nebraska.... 

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The Nebraska Bird 
Review 

A Magazine of Ornithology of the 
Nebraska Region 

Volume 75 June 2007 Number 2 



Published by the 

Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc. 
Founded 1899 


Janis M. Paseka, Editor 

Stephen J. Dfnsmore, Co-editor SSSN 0028-1816 



M 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol.75 No. 2 


SPRING FIELD REPORT, March-May 2007 

Compiled by W. Ross Silcock 
P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 


INTRODUCTION 

Extremes of weather conditions and resulting variation in water conditions 
were noteworthy this spring. The west was very dry, but the Rainwater Basin had 
ample rains resulting in excellent breeding conditions for various waterbirds, notably 
Eared Grebe and American Coot. Shorebird numbers were unremarkable, although 
there was plenty of variation between species. Indeed, Dunlin, with record numbers, 
and Ruddy Turnstones were numerous. Arrival dates were pushing early, but not 
record early. Species earlier than average were American Golden-Plover, Mountain 
Plover, Black-necked Stilt, White-rumped Sandpiper, and Stilt Sandpiper. 

Increasingly associated with wetlands, albeit unrelated to water levels, Greater 
Prairie-Chicken continued to use grassy margins of wetlands in the Rainwater Basin 
for lek sites. Leks were also noted in agricultural fields. Use of these habitats 
suggests ability to adapt and bodes well for the future of this species in southeast 
Nebraska, where it is also doing very well in its traditional native grassland habitats. 

Red-shouldered Hawks are being reported away from the traditional breeding 
site at Fontenetfe Forest, the only site known in the state. Other species continuing 
range expansions and increasing in numbers are Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Carolina 
Wren, Blue-gray Gnatcateher, and Summer Tanager. 

It was a fun spring for rarity-seekers, with a putative first state record Zone¬ 
tailed Hawk, one of fewer than 5 records on the Great Plains north of the breeding 
range, a state 7th record Curve-billed Thrasher, found, appropriately, by the state’s 
Non-game Bird Program Manager, and a 9th state record Golden-crowned Sparrow. 
Lesser highlights, but still major zooties, were Common Crane, Prairie Warbler, 
Connecticut Warbler, and Cape May Warbler. 


ABBREVIATIONS 

ADF: Arbor Day Farm, Nebraska City; 

BOL: Branched Oak L SRA, Lancaster Co; 

Cem: Cemetery; 

FF; Fonteneile Forest, Sarpy Co; 

GPD; Gavins Point Dam, Cedar/Knox Cos; 

HCR: Harlan Co Res, Harlan Co; 

ICSP; Indian Cave SP, Nemaha/Richardson Cos; 

L: Lake; 

LM: L McConaughy SRA, Keith Co; 

LNB: Lakes North and Babcock, Platte Co; 

LO: L Ogallala SRA, Keith Co; 
m.ob.: many observers; 

NC: Nature Center; 

NOURC: Nebraska Ornithologists* Union Records Committee; 



Vot.75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


2i 


NWR: National Wildlife Refuge; 

PL: Pawnee L SRA, Lancaster Co; 

Res: Reservoir; 

RWB: Rainwater Basin; eastern RWB mostly Fillmore, Clay and surrounding 
counties, western RWB mostly Phelps Co; 

SCP: Spring Creek Prairie, Lancaster Co; 

SHP: State Historical Park; 

SL: Sewage Lagoon(s); 

$P: State Park; 

SRA: State Recreation Area; 

WMA: Wildlife Management Area (State); 

WPA: Waterfowl Production Area (Federal); 

WSR: Wind Springs Ranch, s. Sioux Co. 


GAZETTEER: 

Boyer Chute; NWR, Washington Co; 

Harwd Marsh: WPA, Clay Co; 

Jack Sinn: Memorial WMA, Lancaster and Saunders Cos; 

Kiowa: WMA, Scotts Bluff Co; 

Rowe Sanctuary: Lillian Annette Rowe Bird Sanctuary, Buffalo Co; 
Sandhills: large area of sand prairie and wetlands in central Nebraska; 
Tamora: WMA, Seward Co; 

Valentine NWR: Cherry Co; 

Waco-Spikerush: Waco WPA and Spikerush WMA, York Co; 


OBSERVERS 

AD: Ann Duey, Scottsbluff; 

AEK: Allen E. Kurth, Bellevue; 

AG: Alan Grenon, Seattle, WA; 

AK: Alice Kenitz, Gering; 

ARy: Allen Reyer, Bellevue; 

B&DW: Bruce and Donna Waigren, Casper, WY; 
BFH: Bill F. Huser, South Sioux City; 

BG: Betty Grenon, Bellevue; 

BH: Brian Hula, Bellevue; 

BN: Brent Nelson, Scottsbluff; 

CB: Charles Brown, Tulsa, OK; 

CH: Carolyn Hall, Bassett; 

CNK: Clem N. Klaphake, Bellevue; 

CWH: C.W. Huntley, Ogallala; 

D&CN: Don and Colleen Noecker, Albion; 
D&JP: Don and Jan Paseka, Ames; 

DE: Dave Ely, Salem, MA; 

DK: Dan Kim, Wood River; 

DSt: Dave Stage, Elkhom; 

EB: Elliott Bedows, Bellevue; 

G&WH: Glen and Wanda Hoge, Alma; 

GW: Gordon Warrick, Blair; 




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HKH: Helen K. Hughson, Mitchell; 

JED: James E. Ducey, Lincoln; 

JF: John Flavin, Chadron; 

JG: Joseph Gubanyi, Seward; 

JGr: Jonas Grundman, Omaha; 

JGJ: Joel G. Jorgensen, Lincoln; 

JJ: Jan Johnson, Wakefield; 

JLL: Jeanine L. Lackey, Raymond; 

JM: Jeanne Miller, Bennington; 

JP: Jerry Probst, Sioux City, IA; 

JR: Justin Rink, Omaha; 

JSt: Jon Strong, Omaha; 

JT: Jerry Toll, Omaha; 

JWH: John W. Hall, Omaha; 

KD: Kathy DeLara, Mitchell; 

KP: Kevin Poague, Lincoln; 

KS: Kent Skaggs, Kearney; 

L&BP: Loren and Babs Padelford, Bellevue; 
L&CF: Laurence and Carol Falk, Nebraska City; 
LB: Laurel Badura, Kearney; 

LE: Larry Einemann, Lincoln; 

LR: Lanny Randolph, Gibbon; 

LS: Larry Snyder, Kimball; 

MB: Mark Brogie, Creighton; 

MUs: Moni Usasz, Lincoln; 

NF: Nelli Falzgraf, Bellevue; 

NP: Neva Pruess, Lincoln; 

PD: Paul Dunbar, Hastings; 

PH: Pat Heller, Louisville, CO; 

PS: Phil Swanson, Papillion; 

RB: Roland Barth, Bellevue; 

RD: Roger Dietrich, Yankton, SD; 

RE: Rick Eades, Lincoln; 

RH: Robin Harding, Gibbon; 

RHe: Renae Held, Lincoln, NE; 

RS: Rick Schmid, Bellevue; 

RW: Rick Wright, Tucson, AZ; 

SB: Steve Brown, Colorado Springs, CO; 

SK: Sarah Knutie, Tulsa, OK; 

SR: Sarah Rehme, Seward; 

ST: Scott Taylor, Lincoln; 

TB: Tom Bloom, Apple Valley, MN; 

TF: Tim Fennell, Round Rock, TX; 

TH: Tim Hajda, Broken Bow; 

TJW: T.J. Walker, Brady; 

TM: Tracy Morfeld, Valley; 

TP: Theresa Pester, Walton; 

TS: Tom Stehn, Austwell, TX; 

VOB: Valerie O’Brien, Tulsa, OK; 

WF: William Flack, Madison; 

WM: Wayne Mollhoff, Ashland; 

WRS: W. Ross Silcock, Tabor, IA. 



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SPECIES ACCOUNTS 

Greater White-fronted Goose: Routine reports. 

Snow Goose: Best counts were 350,000 between Gothenburg and Kearney 4 Mar 
(SB) and 200,000 at Harvard Marsh 16 Mar (PD). Of interest was the 
composition of the flock of 100,000 near North Platte 8 Mar: 20-30% “Blue 
Geese”, in contrast to the virtual absence of this color morph nearby in the 
Panhandle as recently as 1990 (TJW, Richard Rosche). 

Ross's Goose: Best count was a moderate 100 at PL 11 Mar (LE). One in Dakota 
Co 14 May (BFH) was tardy. 

Cackling Goose: Best count was die “hundreds” at GPD 8 Mar (RE). 

Canada Goose: Best tally was the 100,000 between Gothenburg and Kearney 4 Mar 
(RE). The medium-sized subspecies interior is generally thought to occur 
primarily in eastern Nebraska {Birds of North America ), and so of interest 
was the observation by an experienced observer that “interior types were 
common” in central Nebraska 28 Mar (RW). A pair with 9 “fluffballs” was at 
Gering SL 27 Apr (KD). 

Trumpeter Swan: Routine reports. 

Tundra Swan: Three were found at Rowe Sanctuary 4 Mar (SB,KS); this is a rare 
spring migrant. 

Wood Duck: The 15 at GPD 9 Mar (MB) were on the early side. 

Gadwall: Routine reports. 

Eurasian Wigeon: The only report of this rare, but essentially annual, migrant was 
rather early in York Co 6 Mar (RE); it is the 26th spring record. 

American Wigeon: Routine reports. 

Mallard: Routine reports. 

Blue-winged Teal: Routine reports. 

Cinnamon Teal: Usually 10-12 can be found at Kiowa, and so the amazing 50 there 
22 Apr was a surprise, as well as a record count (KD). Easterly were a single 
at BOL 22 Mar (JGJ), and a hybrid with Blue-winged Teal there 24 Mar 
(JGJ) and 13 Apr (AG,BG). 

Northern Shoveler: A rather early brood of 4 ducklings with a hen was in Seward 
Co 20 May (JG). This is only the 5th report of a brood in the e. RWB since 
1990. 

Northern Pintail: Routine reports. 

Green-winged Teal: Three at Harvard Marsh 28 May (PD) were rather late. 

Canvasback; Two in Sarpy Co 17 May (CNK) were rather late that far east. Also 
rather late was one identified as a female at LO 29 May (JM). Best count was 
a mediocre 200 at BOL 9 Mar (JGJ). 

Redhead: Best count was a moderate 1000 at BOL 9 Mar ((JGJ). Two in the e. 
RWB 26 May (JGJ) were suggestive of breeding, which occurs occasionally 
there. 

Ring-necked Duck: Routine reports. 

Greater Scaup: About 13 were reported statewide through 24 Apr, the last a male in 
Dakota Co (BFH). 

Lesser Scaup: Last away from breeding areas were a single at Harvard Marsh 28 
May (PD) and a pair at LO 29 May (JM). Breeding is limited to the western 
Sandhills. 

Surf Scoter: Only the 5th spring record with details was a first spring bird at Funk 
WPA, Phelps Co, 6 May (KS). The 5 records are 29 Apr-15 May. 



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White-winged Scoter: Also rare in spring, only the 23rd and 24th records were a 
female at GPD 4-9 Mar (RD,MB) and a single at LNB 19 Mar (RE). Both 
dates are rather early, the GPD bird 3rd earliest. 

Long-tailed Duck: A surprise location hosted the only one reported: the small pond 
across the road from Gilbert-Baker WMA, Sioux Co, had a basic male 28 
Mar(WF). 

Buffiebead: Routine reports. 

Common Goldeneye: A female in Sarpy Co 12 May (CNK) was rather late. 

Hooded Merganser: Routine reports. 

Common Merganser: Routine reports. 

Red-breasted Merganser: Routine reports. 

Ruddy Duck: Nesting is rare in the e, RWB, but 2 pairs at Tamora 20 May (JG) 
and 2 males displaying to females in York Co 26 May (JGJ) were suggestive. 

Gray Partridge: The only reports from the main range in the northeast were of a 
road-killed bird near Brunswick 27 Mar (D&JP) and 2 birds 6 miles ne. of 
O’Neill 26 May (DSt). The small population in s. Sioux Co is hanging on; 
6 were huddled behind a bam at WSR 28 Mar (HKH). 

Ring-necked Pheasant: Routine reports. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse: Routine reports. 

Greater Prairie-Chicken: This species is doing well in se. Nebraska and is 
expanding its range by establishing new leks at wetlands surrounded by 
agricultural lands, as well as in crop fields themselves. It is yet to be seen, 
however, whether prairie-chickens will adapt to nesting (as opposed to 
displaying) in nontraditional habitats. But, as noted by Joel Jorgensen, “The 
Greater Prairie-Chicken story in the Rainwater Basin continues”. A lek at 
Rauscher WPA, Fillmore Co, with 10 birds present 9 Apr continues for its 
3rd year (JGJ), and a new lek established in the middle of intensely-farmed 
countryside at Kirkpatrick Basin South WMA, the first for many years in 
York Co, had 2 males 18 May (JGJ). Booming was heard at Harvard Marsh 
28 May (PD), one was at BOL 24 Mar (D&JP), and 6 were at Hultine WPA, 
Clay Co, 30 Mar (BFH,JP). Farther afield, but still in the southeast, 6 were 
on a lek 20 Apr in sw. Nuckolls Co in a field of old com stubble with inter- 
planted wheat (DE); birds have been seen displaying in cornfields in the 
RWB also (fide JGJ), More traditionally, 6 were just west of SCP 2 Apr, in 
native prairie (KP), and one was easterly in sandy prairie in extreme sw. 
Platte Co 20 May (WRS). 

Wild Turkey: Routine reports. 

Northern Bobwhite: One atGering 17 Apr (AK) continues reports of this species’ 
presence throughout the North Platte Valley, 

Common Loon: Record early was one at HCR 11 Mar (G&WH), and also rather 
early was a single at BOL 22 Mar (JGJ). A good count was the 7 in alternate 
plumage at LM 21 Apr (BFH,JP). 

Pied-billed Grebe: Although not record early for the state, 2 in Harlan Co 11 Mar 
were the observers’ earliest ever there (G&WH). 

Horned Grebe: This species was widely reported 13 Mar-28 Apr, with at least 58 
found, including 13 in Knox Co 17 Apr (MB). In addition, a straggler was 
still in Keith Co 20 May (JM). 

Eared Grebe: What may be the first records of attempted breeding south and east of 
the central Sandhills were provided by a pair (2 of 14 birds present) building 
a nest at Waco-Spikerush, 26 May (JGJ), and one (of 28 present) “exhibiting 
nesting behavior” similar to that described by Jorgensen at Waco-Spikerush at 
Harvard Marsh 28 May (PD), 



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Western Grebe: The usual spring “thousands” were at LM 20 Apr (BFH,JP), while 
uncommon eastern sightings were of singles in Douglas Co 28 Apr (JSt), 
Sarpy Co 12 May (CNK), and at Decatur 24 May (TJW), One in Knox Co 17 
Apr (MB) was rather early for the east. 

Clark's Grebe: Routine reports. 

American White Pelican: Two at LO 1 Mar (JGJ) were rather early; earliest dates 
for migrants are in late Feb. Best count was a moderate 500 in Lancaster Co 
13 Apr (RE). 

Double-crested Cormorant: One at Alma SL 18 Mar (G&WH) was rather early, and 
the 5000 at Wagon Train L, Lancaster Co, 13 Apr (RE) tied the high count 
for spring. Breeding may be returning to the LM area after an absence of 
about 60 years; one was on a nest below Kingsley Dam there 28 Apr (MB). 
Some 40+ were nest-building at a traditional site at Valentine NWR 26 May 
(TH). 

American Bittern: Reports were widespread, beginning with one at FF 14 Apr 
(L&BP). A nest with 6 eggs was photographed at Harvard Marsh 28 May 
(PD); on the same day, an excellent tally of 7 individuals was made (PD). 
There are very few nesting records for the RWB; this appears to be the first 
documented. 

Least Bittern: The only report was of one at Harvard Marsh 28 May (PD), where 
water conditions were good. 

Great Blue Heron: Several rookeries were reported in the Panhandle 
(AK,KD,B&DW), but colonies in the east are more unusual; surprising were 
the 60+ nests along the Platte River in Sarpy Co 6 May where 38 nests were 
counted 23 Apr (CNK). By 28 Jun the rookery had 120+ birds, including 
adults and nearly-fledged young (CNK). A rookery with 12 nests near 
Waverly was unexpected (NP), 

Great Egret: One in Lancaster Co 2 Apr (KP) was rather early. 

Snowy Egret: Surprisingly, only one was reported, that at Father Hupp WPA, 
Thayer Co, 11 May 2007 (JGJ). 

Little Blue Heron: Although rarely found in spring, usually more than one is 
reported; this spring the only sighting was of one at FF 15 May (CNK). 

Cattle Egret: One in Otoe Co 26 Mar (L&CF) was record early by 3 days. Reports 
were widespread, but numbers low, with only about 50 found. 

Green Heron: Northwestemmost was one in Lincoln Co 28 Apr (TJW). 

Black-crowned Night-Heron: Routine reports. 

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron: None were reported; this is a rare spring migrant in 
the southeast, but with few recent reports 

Glossy Ibis: Nebraska's 16th record, and only the 3rd report away from the RWB, 
was one in Sarpy Co 25 May 2007 (EB). 

White-faced Ibis: A flock of 21 at Harvard Marsh 13 Apr (PD) was rather early. In 
all, some 75 were reported statewide, although the only report east of the 
RWB was of 6 near Mead 13 May (D&CN). 

Turkey Vulture: Routine reports. 

Osprey: Routine reports. 

Mississippi Kite: As expected, 3-5 were at Ogallala 20-23 May (CNK,JM), but one 
in Lancaster Co rather early on 7 May (LE) was a surprise; it is only the 9th 
spring record away from Keith Co. 

Bald Eagle: The 40 at HCR 5 Mar (G&WH) was a good count. A nest that was 
successful in 2006 in Cass Co had an adult present 25 Mar but was 
abandoned by 1 Jun (CNK). 



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Northern Harrier: The resident pair (since 1999, ST) was seen at Boyer Chute 27 
May (WRS). Potentially a local breeder was one at Jack Sinn 12 May (LE). 

Sharp-shinned Hawk: Routine reports. 

Cooper's Hawk: This species is becoming rather common as a breeder, even in 
cities; a nest with 5 eggs was located in Wilderness Park, Lincoln, 24 May 
(LE,WM), and nest-building was underway in Bellevue 24 Mar (L&BP). 
Another was carrying prey over Seward 21 May (JG). 

Northern Goshawk: About par for the spring, the single report was of a female in 
Knox Co 17 Apr (MB). 

Red-shouldered Hawk: Something is happening with this species; extra-limital 
reports (those away from FF) are increasing. A single bird was seen 3 times 
12 Apr-4 May at PL (LE), and another was at Wehrspann L, Sarpy Co, 22 
Mar (LE). 

Zone-tailed Hawk: An amazing first state record (pending NOURC approval) 
involved sharp-eyed observers noticing one roosting with 6 Turkey Vultures 
at LO 25 Apr and photographed (CB,VOB,SK; details). It could not be 
found there 28 Apr among the 28 vultures on the roost (MB). 

Broad-winged Hawk: Only 10 were reported, all from the east, 19 Apr-9 May (m. 
ob.). 

Swainson’s Hawk: Best count was only 16, those in Buffalo Co 23 Apr (LR,RH). 
Single dark morphs were reported at opposite ends of the state: FF on 21 Apr 
(AEK) and Morrill Co the same day (KD). 

Red-tailed Hawk: The pale “Krider’s Hawk” color morph was reported in Sarpy Co 
2 Apr (CNK) and Douglas Co 10 Apr (TP); easterly reports are uncommon. 
Most Krider’s Hawks are gone from die east by mid-Apr. 

Ferruginous Hawk: Routine reports. 

Rough-legged Hawk: Routine reports. 

Golden Eagle: Routine reports. 

American Kestrel: Routine reports. 

Merlin: A report of the long-distance migrant columharius from the e. RWB 22 
May (JGJ) was rather late for this subspecies. 

Prairie Falcon: Easterly was one in Lancaster Co 3 Mar (LE). 

Peregrine Falcon: Nebraska's 2 resident pairs continued. The Lincoln pair at the 
State Capitol in their 3rd year had 4 eggs 11 Apr, after fledging 4 young the 
past two years, and the Omaha pair on the Woodmen Tower had four 3-week- 
old chicks banded 24 May; some 49 young have been fledged in Omaha in 
the past 16 years. The subspecies tundrim is the more common of the two 
migratory subspecies occurring in Nebraska, and so an anatum in the RWB 
27 Apr (JGJ) was unexpected and was indeed the observer’s first for the 
RWB. 

Virginia Rail: One at WSR was “singing incessantly” in cattails 11 Apr and was 
still there 16 May; no nesting evidence was noted, however (HKH). 

Sora: The 7 at Harvard Marsh 28 May (PD) and 2 in Sarpy Co 31 May (CNK) were 
suggestive of local breeding, but no evidence was noted. Breeding records in 
both the east and the RWB are rare. 

Common Moorhen: One photographed at Tamora 17 May (JG) is the first in 
Nebraska for several years and is indicative of the excellent water conditions 
in the e. RWB this spring. 

American Coot: As mentioned above, water conditions allowed for “what could be a 
banner coot production year” (JGJ) in the e. RWB. Some 48 nest mounds 
were found at 4 e. RWB sites 26 May, including 27 at Tamora (JGJ). Six 
platforms with 6-10 eggs each were at Harvard Marsh 26 May (PD). 



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Sandhill Crane: Highest estimate was 200,000 “in the Platte Valley” 12 Apr (CH). 
Good numbers move through the Panhandle; “hundreds” were at Winters 
Creek L, Scotts Bluff Co, 17 Mar (AK). Easterly, where rare in spring, were 
one over Bellevue 19 Apr (BH) and 3 over Washington Co 29 Apr (CNK). 
The 2-3 west of Burwell 20 May, seen by a driver in a hurry to get to a 
wedding and unable to stop (MUs) were possibly breeding there (must have 
been an important wedding). 

Common Crane; One with about 1000 Sandhill Cranes was reported by a group of 
birders from Boulder, CO, on private property east of Lewellen 10 Mar (PH). 

Whooping Crane: A single bird 16 Mar “on the Platte River” was thought to be 
the individual now in its third winter that has never been to Aransas (TS). 
However, there were 2 near Rowe Sanctuary the next day (CNK) and 1-2 were 
reported in the general area through l Apr (m. ob.). An airplane survey 14 
Mar located a surprising 25 birds in the Platte Valley (fide CH). Finally, 2 
adults and 2 juveniles were on a private wetland in Phelps Co 16-17 Apr 
(LB). 

Black-bellied Plover: Routine reports. 

American Golden-Plover: Five at Harvard Marsh 19 Mar (PD) provided the 2nd- 
earliest arrival date ever by a day. An excellent 500 in the e. RWB 6 May 
(including 326 in one group) and 346 in one field in York Co 25 Apr (JGJ) 
were excellent, but not record, counts. 

Snowy Plover: With water levels a bit higher at LM, none were reported from there. 
The only report was of single migrants in Seward Co 6 May (JGJ) and near 
York the same day (JGJ). 

Semipalmated Plover: Routine reports. 

Piping Plover; Of interest was one at L Minatare, Scotts Bluff Co, 28 Apr (KD); 
nesting attempts have been made there in recent years, but only a single bird 
was found this year and water levels were high (KD), Seven at LM 20 Apr 
(BFHJP) and 3 at HCR 28 Apr (G&WH) were at locations where breeding 
has occurred, the latter site of particular interest. The remaining reports, of 
some 14 birds, were from traditional eastern locations. Very early were 
singles at Ashland 2 Apr (RHe) and, a belated report, at Valley 4 Apr 2006 
(RHe). 

Killdeer; Small fledglings were reported 4 May in Lancaster Co (LE), early, but not 
startlingly so. 

Mountain Plover: Displaying and copulation was noted among 3 pairs and a group 
of 3 in Kimball Co 26 Mar (LS) and 2 were courting sw. of the Kimball 
Airport 21 Apr (BFH,JP), The first date, 26 Mar, is rather early for this 
species. 

Black-necked Stilt: Rather early were the 6 at Lakeside 12 Apr (WM); two at 
Chilibaba Pond near Scottsbluff 18 Apr (AK) and another near Kiowa 26 May 
(AK) were the only others reported. 

American Avocet: Routine reports. 

Spotted Sandpiper: The 25 in Lincoln Co 8 May (TJW) was a good tally. 

Solitary Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Greater Yellowlegs: Routine reports, 

Willet: More than usual were easterly; about 65 were reported east of the RWB, 
including 36 in Lancaster Co 22 Apr (LE). 

Lesser Yellowlegs: The 500 in the e, RWB 27 Apr (JGJ) was an excellent spring 
count. The 3 high spring counts are in the short period 24-29 Apr, 

Upland Sandpiper: Routine reports. 



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Wbimbrel: None were reported; this is a rare but regular migrant in spring. 

Long-billed Curlew; Ten birds near North Platte 26 Mar (fide TJW) were rather 
early; earliest spring dates are 20-22 Mar. 

Hudsonian Godwft: Best count was a moderate 92, in the e. RWB 28 Apr (JGJ). 
Tying die 3rd-earliest arrival date were 30 at LBN and 11 in Platte Co on 11 
Apr (D&JP). Also early were 58 at Harvard Marsh 13 Apr (PD) and 30 in the 
e. RWB 14 Apr (JGJ). 

Marbled Godwft: Generally rare in the east, several showed up there; 8 were at 
LBN 11 Apr (D&JP), 2 in Lancaster Co 12 Apr (LE), one in Seward Co 2 
May (TJW), and 3 near Waverly 5 May (WRS). 

Roddy Turnstone; Good numbers were repented, including a remarkable near-record 
44 near Utica 19 May (JGJ). In all, about 20 others were reported 4-24 May 
(m. ob.). Of interest was one using a dry field in the e. RWB 4 May (JGJ); 
the observer's studies have shown that several species other than Buff-breasted 
Sandpipers use such habitat. 

Snnderllng: Routine reports. 

Semipalmated Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Western Sandpiper: None were reported; this is a regular but rare spring migrant 

Least Sandpiper: One at BOL 24 Mar (JGJ) was somewhat early. 

White-rumped Sandpiper: The 4000 in the e. RWB 17 May (JGJ) was an 
excellent count; the 3 high counts are in the very short period 16-20 May. 
Another in the e, RWB 27 Apr was photographed (JGJ); this is only 9 days 
later than the earliest documented date. 

Baird’s Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Pectoral Sandpiper: The 350 at Father Hupp WMA, Thayer Co, 11 May (JGJ), 
was an excellent count. 

Dunlin: This may have been a record spring for this species; an all-time e. RWB 
high count of 235 (3 times the previous high) on 17 May included a single- 
site tally of 133 at Renquist WMA, York Co (JGJ), and some 250 more were 
reported 2-24 May (m. ob.). 

Stilt Sandpiper: The 2nd- and 4th-earliest on record were 5 in Seward Co 4 Apr 
(LE) and one in the e, RWB 9 Apr (JGJ). Numbers were considered low early 
on (JGJ), but good numbers were reported starting mid-May. Best count was 
a moderate 500 in the e. RWB 19 May (JGJ). 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper: Interestingly, the first to appear were in the northeast, 5 
in Dakota Co 29-30 Apr (BFH). Best counts, as expected, were 250 in the e. 
RWB 17 May (JGJ) and 226 in Thayer Co 11 May (JGJ). Last were 35 in the 
e. RWB in 4-inch-tall com 26 May (JGJ). 

Short-billed Dowitcher: The reports were of about 60 birds in the expected period 
10-20 May (m, ob.). 

Long-billed Dowitcher: Rather early were 2 at Tamora 18 Mar (L&BP) and 2 at 
Harvard Marsh 21 Mar (PD). An excellent count was the 1900 in the e. RWB 
4 May, including 976 at Sora WMA, Fillmore Co (JGJ). The 3 highest 
counts are in die short period 1-4 May. 

Wilson’s Snipe: Winnowing birds were heard in Lancaster Co 12-13 Apr 
(LE,AG,BG); breeding has been reported in Lancaster Co in the past, 
although winnowing may continue for days or weeks before breeding takes 
place. Somewhat early, if indeed migrants, were the 5 at Harvard Marsh 16 
Mar (PD), where wintering generally does not occur. 



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American Woodcock: Sightings in the Sandhills suggest that the breeding range 
may extend farther west than generally realized; 3 were near Dannebrog 13 
Mar (WF) and 2 at Goose L, near Chambers, 23 Mar (WF). Well to the west 
of expected Platte Valley reports was one well-seen near Hershey 27 Mar 
(TJW); this is about the 4th report from Lincoln Co, all Mar-Jun. 

Wilson’s Phalarope: One in Scottsbluff Co 17 Mar (AK) was record early by a day. 
Large numbers were seen in the e, RWB, where 2600 were estimated 28 Apr 
(JGJ), Breeding has occurred in the e. RWB, but records are few, and so 
copulation at Sora WMA, Fillmore Co, 9 May (JGJ), and two nests each 
with 4 eggs at Harvard Marsh 14 and 29 May (PD) were significant finds. 

Red-necked Phalarope: Unexpected in the east, where rare in spring, was one in 
Sarpy Co 22-26 May (CNK,EB,JR). There are only about 30 spring records 
from the eastern half of the state. 

Franklin’s Gull: Routine reports, 

Bonaparte’s Gull: Routine reports. 

Mew Gull: An adult at Salt L, Lincoln, 13 Mar (JGJ) was a surprise; this is only 
the 11th spring record. 

Ring-billed Gull: Routine reports. 

California Gull: The only reports were of one in Scotts Bluff Co 17 Mar (AK), a 
rather early date away from LM, and, unexpectedly, one easterly at BOL 24 
Mar (D&JP), only the 6th spring record for the east 

Herring Gull: Routine reports, 

Thayer’s Gull: The only report was of an adult at LO 1 Mar (JGJ). 

Lesser Black-backed Gull: Now regular in occurrence, 3 were reported: adults 
(possibly the same bird?) at BOL 10 Mar (JGJ) and Salt L, Lincoln, 13 Mar 
(JGJ), and a single at LO 28 Apr (MB). 

Glaucous Gull: Two were reported: a first-year at BOL 9-11 Mar (JGJ,LE,CNK) 
and a single at HCR 4 Mar (G&WH). 

Least Tern: Most reports were from traditional eastern locations and from the LM 
area. However 2 nests and a total of 8 birds at a public beach in Saunders Co 
28 May (CNK) were unexpected; by 29 Jun 11 adults, 5 on nests, and 2 
mobile young were present (CNK), A county first for the observer was one in 
Antelope Co 29 May (MB), 

Caspian Tern: The usual small numbers for spring were reported: 5 at BOL 7 May 
(LE) and singles in Sarpy Co 29 May (CNK) and at LO 29 May (JM). 

Black Tern: Routine reports. 

Common Tern: Only 3 were reported: singles at Harvard Marsh 10 May (PD), a 
rather early date, LO 29 May (JM), and in Antelope Co 30 May (MB), a 
county first for the observer, 

Forster’s Tern: Nesting was underway at Valentine NWR by 26 May (TH). 

Rock Pigeon: Routine reports. 

Eurasian Collared-Dove: Best count was 20 in Bassett 3 Mar (CH). 

White-winged Dove: The increase in reports continues, with 3 this spring. One was 
in Omaha 25-30 Mar (RS, m,ob,), another was photographed in a Papillion 
yard 20 May (PS), and one was in Scotts Bluff Co 26 May (AK). Most 
reports are Apr-Oct, and the Omaha sighting is only the 4th outside this 
period. 

Mourning Dove: Singles in Dixon Co 11 Mar (JJ) and Scotts Bluff Co 16 Mar 
(KD) were rather early at those locations. 



M 


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Inca Dove: A Texan experienced with this species reported 3 in Lincoln 31 May 
(TF); unfortunately no photographs were taken. This species, like White¬ 
winged Dove, is moving northward on the Great Plains. 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo: A good count was the 16 at FF 10 May (JR), and rather 
early for the location were singles in Lincoln Co 20 May (D&JP) and in 
Keith Co die same day (JM). 

Black-billed Cuckoo: Five were reported, 3 of these from Otoe Co on 9, 12 and 31 
May (L&CF). The others were at FF 10 May (JR) and in Garden Co 20 May 
(JM). 

Barn Owl: Rather early arrivals were one roosting on a rock face at 1CSP 18 Mar 
(WF) and another returning to the Creighton nest site at the northeast edge of 
(he summer range 22 Mar for the 3rd year (MB). 

Eastern Screech-Owl: Rare in Nebraska, a red morph road-killed bird was found in 
Cass Co 18 Mar (WM). Two young fledglings were in a Lincoln yard 26 
May (MUs). 

Great Horned Owl: Nestlings were found in Sheridan Co 12 Apr (WM) and Scotts 
Bluff Co 19 Apr (KD), and two fledglings with an adult were in Washington 
Co 29 Apr (CNK), 

Burrowing Owl: Reports from the e. RWB are increasing; 1-2 were seen at a 
“ghost” prairie-dog town in Clay Co from 9 Apr (JGJ), one was at Hultine 
WPA, Clay Co, 2 Apr (PD), and one was at Harvard Marsh 9 Apr (PD). 

Barred Owl: This species appears to be undergoing a westward expansion in both 
the Platte and Republican Valleys. One was flushed from an apparent nest site 
in Nuckolls Co 20 Apr (DE), and 1-2 were along the Republican River in sw. 
Nuckolls Co 1 Apr (LR,RH). Eggs hatched in a Douglas Co nest box around 
14 Apr (DSt). 

Long-eared Owl: None were reported. 

Short-eared Owl: Six reports were received of 8 birds through 17 Apr (m.ob.); the 
reports were statewide. 

Northern Saw-whet Owl: “Simple, evenly-spaced tooting whistles” were heard 26 
May at Valentine NWR (TH); the reporter assumed it was this species. The 
summer distribution of this species in Nebraska is poorly-known. 

Common Nlghthawk; Arrivals showed the typical east-west difference in arrival 
dates: 2 May in Otoe Co (L&CF) and 24 May at WSR (HKH); both dates 
were fairly early at those locations. 

Common Poorwlll: There are occasional reports of this species in the east, usually 
in grasslands in the southeast. One was heard singing at SCP 21 May (fide 
KP). 

Chuck-wUl’s-widow: Somewhat westerly, but within the expected range were 
singles at Oak Glen WMA, Seward Co, 12 May (LE) and in w. Douglas Co 
23 May (DSt). 

Whip-poor-will: One in Lincoln 22 Apr (JED) was rather early. 

Chimney Swift: Routine reports. 

White-throated Swift: Routine reports. 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: Nest-building was under way in Lincoln 12 May 
(MUs). 

Belted Kingfisher: Routine reports. 

Red-headed Woodpecker: Singles at FF 23 Mar (CNK) and 28 Mar (RW) were 
early for non-wintering birds; a few winter there, or at least not far to the 
south most years. 



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Red-bellied Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker: A female in Thomas Co 25 Mar (WF) was westerly. 

Red-naped Sapsucker: One identified as this species in Hall Co 5 Mar was well- 
described, with no apparent hybrid characters (WF); it would be only the 2nd 
spring record for Nebraska if accepted by NOURC, albeit easterly and early 
for this species. 

Downy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Hairy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Northern Flicker: Routine reports. 

Plicated Woodpecker: Reports were from the FF area, where a pair nested at the 
sw. comer of the area (CNK). Young were being fed 13 May but had fledged 
by 28 May (CNK). It is unsure how many breeding pairs are in the area, but 
it seems unlikely there are more than two. 

Olive-sided Flycatcher: One in Lincoln Co 19 May (L&BP) was westerly; it is rare 
as far west as the Panhandle. 

Western Wood-Pewee: One in Lincoln Co 19 May (CNK, details) was easterly; the 
species breeds east to the LM area, and apparently occurs farther east during 
migration, but most reports east of there are undocumented. The other reports 
were, as expected, from the Panhandle. 

Eastern Wood-Pewee: The 20 at FF 10 May (JR) was a record spring tally. 

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher: About the norm for a spring, one report was received: a 
single was at SCP 21 May (KP). 

Acadian Flycatcher: None were reported; arrival is around mid-May. 

Alder Flycatcher: Banding data indicate that this species is a common migrant in 
the LM area; thus singles there 20 and 24 May (JM) may not be too 
surprising. Another was in Seward Co 30 May (JG) and 4 were counted at FF 
16 May (JR). 

Willow Flycatcher: Routine reports. 

Least Flycatcher: Routine reports. 

Cordilleran Flycatcher: Rarely reported in migration, one at WSR 30-31 May 
(HKH) was only the 11th spring report away from the breeding range. 

Eastern Phoebe: First reported was in Otoe Co 13 Mar (L&CF), about on time, but 
one in Lincoln Co 16 Mar (TJW) was early for the location. 

Say’s Phoebe: First was in Frontier Co 23 Mar (TJW), about on time. 

Great Crested Flycatcher: One at ICSP 28 Apr (EB) was about on time, too. 

Cassin’s Kingbird: None were reported; arrival is in early May. 

Western Kingbird: Routine reports. 

Eastern Kingbird: Routine reports, 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher: Now reported yearly, even as a breeder, this species 
continues to engender increased reports. A pair returned to a breeding site sw. 
of Kearney 23 May for the 3rd year (KS), and at least one was seen on 4 
occasions at Eppley Airfield, Omaha, during May (JT). The Eppley birds 
have been present for some 5 years and nested during at least 2 of those years 
(fide JT). Singles were reported as well in Hall Co 12 May (TB) and Colfax 
Co 17 May (LE). 

Northern Shrike: Last to leave was one in Dixon Co 9 Mar (JJ), an early departure 
date. 

Loggerhead Shrike: Arrival was on time. First to appear were singles at BOL 11 
Mar (JGJ) and in Harlan Co the same day (G&WH). Singles reached Dakota 
Co 20 Mar (WF) and Scotts Bluff Co a little late on 28 Apr (AK). 



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Bell’s Vireo: Routine reports. 

Yellow-throated Vireo: Nest-building had started in Lincoln 14 May and 4 eggs 
were present 24 May (LE,WM). 

Plumbeous Vireo; The only report was of a migrant at West Lawn Cem, Gering, 16 
May (BN); the migration period is 9-28 May. 

Blue-headed Vireo: The 8-10 in Douglas Co 4 May (TP) was a good count 
(estimate?). Westerly was one near Orleans 11 May (G&WH), one of still 
very few reports away from the east. 

Warbling Vireo: Earliest were rather early at FF 21 Apr (L&BP) and PL 22 Apr 
(LE; 2 birds). Nest-building had started by 8 May at FF (ARy). 

Philadelphia Vireo: Singles in Seward Co 4 May (JG) and at ADF 25 May 
(L&CF) were as expected, but a good find was one in Scotts Bluff Co 26 
May (KD, details), only the 4th Panhandle record. 

Red-eyed Vireo: Routine reports. 

Blue Jay: One on a nest in Cass Co 1 May (LE) was on the early side for this 
species; published egg dates are 30 Apr-20 Jun. 

Pinyon Jay: None were reported; this species becomes secretive in the nesting 
season, but even so, there is very little definite evidence that it nests in the 
state in any numbers. 

Black-billed Magpie: Reports from the northeast were encouraging: 2 near 
Creighton 8 Mar were the observer’s first there for 2 years (MB), and 4 more 
were found in Knox Co 11 Mar (RD). Two were in Colfax Co 23 Mar (LE), 
and 2 were in Seward Co 7-8 Mar (SR), both easterly locations. 

American Crow: Routine reports. 

Horned Lark: An unusual sight was the 16 at the observer’s feeder in sw. Dixon 
Co 2 Mar; they were chased by juncos but finally accepted (JJ). Juveniles 
were fledged by 21 Apr in Nuckolls Co (DE); it is not unusual to see fledged 
birds in Mar. 

Purple Martin: One at Ogallala 19 Mar (CWH) was rather early; earliest dates are in 
mid-Mar. The 8 that arrived in Alma 2 Apr departed during a cold snap 
(G&WH). Other early birds were 7-8 in Nuckolls Co 1 Apr (LR,RH). One at 
Stapleton 6 May was one of few records from the western Loup drainage (LR, 
RH). 

Tree Swallow: Three at Alma 18 Mar (G&WH) were early; record early date is 15 
Mar. 

Violet-green Swallow: Routine reports. 

Northern Rough-winged Swallow: Routine reports. 

Bank Swallow: Routine reports. 

Cliff Swallow: Routine reports. 

Barn Swallow: Routine reports. 

Black-capped Chickadee: The first for 3 years in the observer’s yard at Brady 
appeared 11 Mar (TJW). This species, along with Blue Jay and American 
Crow, were notable by their absence in Nuckolls Co 20 Apr (DE). It appears 
the recovery still has a way to go, especially in south-central parts of the 
state. On the other hand, 20 were in a canyon in se. Lincoln Co 23 Apr 
(TJW). 

Tufted Titmouse: One in n. Thurston Co 17 May (BFH) was a rare sighting that far 
north; it was only the 3rd sighting for Thurston, Dakota or Dixon Cos, the 
first in 2003. Nest-building was noted at Neale Woods, Douglas Co, 19 Apr 
(JGr), rather early. 




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Red-breasted Nuthatch: Usually an early arrival in fall and late to leave in spring, 
one at Omaha 21 May (RS) was tardy. Latest dates away from breeding areas 
are at the end of May. 

White-breasted Nuthatch: All birds seen west to Hall Co 28 Mar were of the 
eastern subspecies (RW) as expected; breeding in the Platte Valley is rare west 
of Dawson Co, and most birds seen there in winter are likely not residents. 
The extent of winter movement of the western subspecies (which breeds in the 
Pine Ridge) is not well known, but appears to be limited. 

Pygmy Nuthatch: A pair was again nesting in a large snag at Wildcat Hills NC, 
Scotts Bluff Co, 24 May (AK), Nesting has become the norm in this area 
since the mid-1990s. 

Brown Creeper: Routine reports. 

Rock Wren: Routine reports. 

Carolina Wren: Reports in the last 2-3 years show the range covering about half the 
state; the western limits were defined well this spring by reports of one 
singing in Knox Co 17 Apr (MB), 2 in Nance Co 8 Apr (LR,RH), one in 
Hall Co 5 Mar (WF), one singing in Kearney Co 1 Apr (BFH), and singles at 
McCook 26-27 May (LR,RH). Nest-building started in Bellevue 2 Apr, with 
the first egg laid 6 Apr, 4 eggs present 9 Apr, and 5 young hatched from 6 
eggs 28 Apr, despite 20 degree temperatures (ARy). 

House Wren: Routine reports. 

Winter Wren: The 4 reports of 5 birds were all from FF 17 Mar-10 Apr (m. ob.), a 
typical spring. 

Sedge Wren: Most migrants pass through by mid-May, and so pairs seen after this 
may stay to breed, generally an uncommon occurrence in Jun in Nebraska 
(although the numbers that reappear in mid-Jul may breed also). Thus of 
interest were 8 in tall grass at Boyer Chute 27 May, and 3 in rough grassland 
near Arlington the same day (WRS). Apparently this species has been present 
at Boyer Chute Jun-Aug each year since 1999 (JT,BG). 

Marsh Wren: One at BOL 24 Mar (D&JP) was early if a migrant, although birds 
were on territory in Holt Co as early as 23 Mar (see below). Three singing at 
Harvard Marsh 28 May (PD) were near the s. edge of the breeding range. 
Singing males on territory as early as 23 Mar at Goose L, Holt Co, were of 
the western song type (WF), possibly a separate species. In Nebraska western 
birds occur eastward to the edge of the Sandhills and are separated from 
eastern types by a strip lacking suitable marsh habitat running southeastward 
from O’Neill. 

Golden-crowned Kinglet: One in Lincoln 14 Mar (LE) was rather early; wintering 
can occur on occasion in the southeast. 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet: Routine reports. 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher: Numbers continue to increase as the range expands and 
consolidates; 30 were along Old Stage Rd, Scotts Bluff Co, 24 May (KD), 
where die species has been found since 1998. One was in Keith Co 20 May 
(JM), where numbers are still low. 

Eastern Bluebird: Routine reports. 

Mountain Bluebird: At least one was back at the breeding site at Wildcat Hills 
NC, Scotts Bluff Co, by 6 Mar (AK) and by 9 Mar at nest boxes near 
Chadron (JF). This species is usually common in cedar canyons in se. 
Lincoln Co, but none were found 8 Mar (TJW); perhaps they had departed for 
the breeding grounds. 



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Townsend’s Solitaire: Routine reports. 

Veery: The only report was of 2 at FF 8 May (NF). 

Gray-cheeked Thrush: A total of 7 were reported, 6 in the east 7-17 May 
(L&BP,LE,JR), and one unexpectedly at Ash Hollow SHP, Garden Co (JM). 
There are about 30 Panhandle records for spring. 

Swainson’s Thrush: Record early by 2 days was one at ADF 16 Apr (L&CF); a 
good count was the 45 at FF 10 May (JR). 

Hermit Thrush: Singles in Dixon Co 30 Mar (JJ) and at FF 12 May (CNK) 
marked the extremes of the normal migration period. 

Wood Thrush: Routine reports. 

American Robin: A group of 350 at Plattsmouth Cem 6 Apr (CNK) were late for 
such a large number. 

Gray Catbird: Routine reports. 

Northern Mockingbird: One was as far north as Wayne Co by 23 Apr (D&JP); 
even in summer this species is scarce north of the Platte River. 

Brown Thrasher: Routine reports. 

Curve-billed Thrasher: The long-staying bird (since Oct 2002!) at the Frimann 
Ranch in se. Sioux Co was singing and trying to make a nest 14 Apr (fide 
AK); perhaps it will meet the one found and photographed near Madrid in 
Perkins Co 22 Apr (JGJ). The latter is only the 7th documented for 
Nebraska. 

European Starling: Routine reports. 

American Pipit: Sightings from 19 Mar at LNB (RE) through 19 May in Logan Co 
(D&JP) define the normal migration period. 

Sprague’s Pipit: The three reports were of 3 on the grassy north side of Harvard 
Marsh 16 Apr (PD), 15-20 on the edge of a field of small grain in Clay Co 
23 Apr (WM), and singles in Dakota Co 29-30 Apr (BFH). 

Cedar Waxwing: Nest-building was noted in Scotts Bluff Co 26 May (AK), 
somewhat early for this species. 

Blue-winged Warbler: Two were found together in Scotts Bluff Co 8 May (AD), 
and one was seen at the site later (KD, details), for only the 4th spring 
Panhandle record. 

Golden-winged Warbler: A typical spring for this species had 3 reported: singles 
in Washington Co 5 May (JT), at ADF 6 May (L&CF), and at FF 8 May 
(L&BP). 

Tennessee Warbler: Routine reports. 

Orange-crowned Warbler: Routine reports. 

Nashville Warbler: Only about 10 were reported, all in the east (m. ob.). 

Northern Parula: Routine reports. 

Yellow Warbler: Routine reports. 

Chestnut-sided Warbler: The only two reported were in Sarpy Co: 9 May (L&BP) 
and 12 May (CNK). 

Magnolia Warbler: The 5 reported were all in the southeast 9-14 May (m. ob.). 

Cape May Warbler: There was a good showing for this normally casual spring 
migrant; the 3 reported were in Lancaster Co 7 May (LE), in Lincoln 11 May 
(STJGJ), and at Seward Cem 17 May (LE). These are only the 18th-20th 
spring reports since 1982, all in the period 7-20 May. 

Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler: Routine reports. 

Yellow-rumped (Audubon’s) Warbler: None were reported. 



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Black-throated Green Warhler: The only report was of one in Douglas Co 12 May 
(TP). 

Blackburnian Warbler; The only two reported were singles at FF 9 May (CNK) 
and a bit westerly at Stromsburg 14 May (LR.RH). 

Yellow-throated Warbler; Usually the first wood-warbler to arrive in spring, arrival 
was record-early this spring by 4 days, with 2 at FF l Apr (RS). All reports 
were from FF, where best count was 4 on 19 Apr (KS), and the last song 
heard was 10 May (L&BP). 

Prairie Warbler: This species occasionally appears far northwest of its usual range; 
one along the Niobrara River in extreme e. Cherry Co 28 May (GW) was only 
die 7th documented spring record for the state. 

Palm Warbler: Only two were reported: singles at Wehrspann L, Sarpy Co, 26 Apr 
(JWH), and in Sarpy Co 6 May (CNK). 

Bay-breasted Warbler: Rare in spring, the only report was of one in Douglas Co 
12 May (TP). 

Blackpoll Warbler: Good numbers were reported, about 40, in the short period 1- 
17 May (m. ob.). Westernmost was one in Broken Bow 11 May (TH). 

Cerulean Warbler: At least one was at FF: one was at the upper boardwalk 7 May 
(L&BP) and another was heard singing briefly in Mormon Hollow 9 May 
(JR), Surprisingly far west was one singing and seen well at Hastings 10 May 
(PD). There are only about 20 reports away from the Missouri Valley. 

Black-and-white Warbler: Routine reports, 

American Redstart: Uncommon in the west, singles were at North Platte 19 May 
(TJW) and in Garden Co 24 May (JM). A good count was the 30 in Thurston 
Co 17 May (BFH). 

Prothonotary Warbler; The only report was of one gathering nest material at FF 8 
May (L&BP,ARy). 

Ovenbird: The 4 at ICSP 28 Apr (L&BP,EB) were a bit early. 

Northern Waterthrush: There were several reports, totaling about 12 birds, 27 Apr 
(L&BP) through 19 May (LE,D&JP). 

Louisiana Waterthrush: Reports were mostly from FF, where earliest was there 2 
Apr (ARy,RB), only a day after a Yellow-throated Warbler, and 2 were found 
19 Apr (KS). The only other report was of 3 at Platte River SP, Cass Co 
(RE). 

Kentucky Warbler: The 3 reports were from FF, probably of the same bird, a male 
on territory 10-12 May (L&BP,JR, fide CNK). This species has not been 
reported very often from FF. 

Connecticut Warbler: There were 2 reports of this rare migrant: one was singing in 
Douglas Co 12-13 May (TP), and another was at Schramm SP, Sarpy Co, 12 
May (L&BP). 

Mourning Warbler: Routine reports. 

MacGillivray’s Warbler: Routine reports. 

Common Yellowthroat: Routine reports. 

Hooded Warbler: The only report was of a singing male well seen at Hastings 7 
May (PD). This species can pop up almost anywhere in spring. 

Wilson's Warbler: Only 7 were reported, all in the east 2-13 May 
(L&BP,L&CF,TP). 

Canada Warbler: None were reported, a surprise. 

Yellow-breasted Chat: Routine reports. 



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Summer Tanager: This species was widely-reported westward on the Great Plains 
of Kansas and Colorado this spring. Nebraska reports included one 
photographed in Scotts Bluff Co 23 Apr (KD), only the 18th record away 
from the east and a record early date. It would be interesting to know whether 
these westerly birds are of the southwestern subspecies cooperi; available 
photos are equivocal. The pair at ICSP 11 May (L&CF) were at a traditional 
location, but reports continue to increase at FF, where at least 3 were reported 
beginning 2 toy (JR, m.ob.), also very early. A female was gathering nest 
material at FF 9 toy (L&BP) and territorial activity was seen there 10 toy 
(JR). One was in a Bellevue yard 10 May (L&BP). 

Scarlet Tanager: Routine reports. 

Western Tanager: Routine reports. 

Spotted Towhee: Most depart from the east by early toy, but one lingered in 
Lincoln until 24 toy (LE). A well-described hybrid was in Bellevue 23 Apr 
(ARy). 

Eastern Towhee: Good numbers had arrived in FF by 31 Mar, when 8-10 were 
reported, all males (JR). Phenotypically pure birds occur westward in the 
Republican Valley to about Orleans; one was singing in Nuckolls Co 20 Apr 
(DE); another was near Gibbon 22 Apr, where Spotteds predominate in 
summer (LR,RH). Most surprising was a phenotypically pure silent male at 
LM 21 Apr (BFH); banding studies there (Brown et al.) found no 
phenotypically pure Eastern Towhees. 

Cassin’s Sparrow: None were reported; arrival is in mid- to late May. 

American Tree Sparrow: One at Hummel Park, Omaha, 4 May (JR) was rather 
late. 

Chipping Sparrow: Rather early were singles at ADF 22 Mar (L&CF) and in 
Buffalo Co 25 Mar (RW). 

Clay-colored Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Brewer’s Sparrow: The only report was of 2 in Scotts Bluff Co 28 Apr (KD). 

Field Sparrow: Arrival was early, with at least 8 birds found in late Mar (m. ob.). 
Earliest was in Frontier Co 23 Mar (TJW); there are very few earlier records 
for the state. Nest-building in Dixon Co 28 Apr (BFH) was early. 

Vesper Sparrow: A nest in Dodge Co with 5 eggs 16 May had 5 young 23 May; it 
was located in small patch of alfalfa and grass near larger alfalfa and row-crop 
fields (D&JP). This species (eastern subspecies?) has adapted to nesting in 
row-crop fields in the east 

Lark Sparrow: A nest with 6 eggs ne. of O’Neill 26 May (DSt) was a little early. 

Lark Banting: A major surprise both by location and date was a male well seen in 
York Co 4 Apr (LE). Spring stragglers occur in the northeast on occasion, but 
are much rarer southeastward. 

Savannah Sparrow: One in Otoe Co 13 Mar (L&CF) was rather early. A major 
influx was noted in Nuckolls Co 20 Apr, when “hundreds per mile of fence- 
line” were found; surprisingly, none were there the next day (DE). 

Grasshopper Sparrow: One in Hall Co 26 Mar (DK) was rather early; earliest dates 
in the literature are earlier than this, but are undocumented. 

Henslow’s Sparrow: Earliest reported were 2 at SCP 11 toy (KP) and 7 in a 
lightly-grazed native grass pasture near Palmyra 12 toy (WRS). Generally 
this species avoids pastures that are grazed to the extent that the preferred 
structure is damaged (standing dead stalks and significant litter layer). A 
single was a surprise in native grassland at Oak Glen WMA, Seward Co, 23 
toy (LE). 




Vol.75 No. 2 


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£1 


Le Conte’s Sparrow: The only report was of one in Otoe Co 17 Apr (L&CF). 

Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow: The only report was of one at SCP 21 May (KP); 
this is at peak migration timing for this species. 

Fox Sparrow: Good numbers were reported 8 Mar-16 Apr (m. ob.), including 
counts of 8-10 at FF 21-29 Mar (JR,RW,RS,L&BP). 

Lincoln’s Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Swamp Sparrow: One at FF 17 Mar (EB) was early if a migrant; over-wintering 
may occur on occasion in the southeast. Early dates for migrants are in late 
Mar. 

White-throated Sparrow: Routine reports. 

White-crowned Sparrow: Most of this species in Nebraska are the pale-lored 
subspecies gambelii ; black-lored birds are rarely reported, and may originate 
either from the Rocky Mountains (subspecies oriantha) or Canada (subspecies 
leucophrys). Thus of interest were 2 reports of black-lored birds from 
opposite ends of the state: one at a Scotts Bluff Co feeder 22 Apr (KD) and 
another in South Sioux City 23 Apr (BFH). There is evidence that leucophrys 
occurs statewide in Nebraska and in eastern Colorado in winter, when most 
oriantha are presumed to have departed. Thus it is difficult to determine 
subspecies of dark-lored birds in the west in spring and fall, although there 
are Nebraska specimens from there that resemble oriantha. 

Harris’s Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Golden-crowned Sparrow: Nebraska’s 9th record, 4th documented, was of one 
with White-crowned Sparrows photographed near Glen, Sioux Co, 4 May 
(B&DW). 

Dark-eyed Junco: Reports of “Pink-sided Junco” in the east persist; while its 
occurrence there is not impossible, of course, this form is poorly-documented 
in die east. The few available photos show at best intergrades of “Oregon” and 
“Pink-sided” Juncos; phenotypically pure “Pink-sideds” are striking, brightly- 
marked birds, 

McCown’s Longspur: The two reports were from Kimball Co: several groups were 
there 26 Mar (LS), and “hundreds” were migrating 21 Apr (L&BP). 

Lapland Longspur: “Hundreds” migrating over LM 21 Apr (BFH,JP) were very 
late; peak migration is in Mar, 

Chestnut-collared Longspur: Two had arrived at WSR by 15 Apr (HKH) and, near 
the eastern edge of the Nebraska summer range, 2 males were 6 miles ne. of 
O’Neill 26 May (DSt). 

Northern Cardinal: A pair in the observer’s yard near Morrill, Scotts Bluff Co, 16 
May were the first there since Jun 2006 (KD); small populations have 
established in the western North Platte Valley in the last few years. Another 
was in Morrill Co 30 Mar (WF). The western limits of the summer range in 
the Sandhills are not well known, but birds in Blaine Co 24 Mar and Thomas 
Co 25 Mar (WF) were at the putative western limits. 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak: Westerly was one in Lincoln Co 19 May (CNK); 
migrants occur some distance west of the summer range. Unusual was one at 
Hastings 7 May with the red color on its bib replaced by lemon-yellow (PD). 
Nest-building in Lincoln 12 May (MUs) was rather early. 

Black-headed Grosbeak: Only the observer’s 2nd for Knox Co was one at 
Creighton 14-15 May; the other was 3 May 1992 (MB). A male in Sarpy Co 
12 May (EB; details) was only the 5th in the east since 1981. 



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Blue Grosbeak: Routine reports. 

Lazuli Bunting: Spring migrants regularly (but rarely, i.e. in small numbers) 
appear in the east; this year one was at a Doitglas Co feeder 9 May (DSt), one 
was near Valley 16 May (TM), and 2 were in Raymond 20 May (JLL). A bit 
farther west was one in Hastings 10 May (PD). 

Indigo Bunting: Routine reports. 

Dickcissel: Unexpected westerly this early were singles in Lincoln and Hayes Cos 
19 May (CNK,LR,RH). 

Bobolink: Good numbers were present in Lincoln Co this spring (TJW). 

Red-winged Blackbird: A flock of 4000 in Dawson Co was early on 4 Mar 
(LR,RH); large numbers usually appear later in Mar. 

Eastern Meadowlark: Early dates are in early Mar, usually singing birds; one such 
was at PL 11 Mar (LE). Scattered populations occur in Sandhills wetlands; a 
single bird was “singing persistently” at Box L, Arthur Co, 26 Mar (WF). 

Western Meadowlark: A nest with 2 eggs near Osceola 20 May (WRS) was a bit 
early. 

Yellow-headed Blackbird: Six nests with 1-4 eggs were found at Harvard Marsh 

28 May (PD), a typical situation for that date. 

Rusty Blackbird: The only reports of this apparently-declining species were of 1-2 
in Dixon Co 11-22 Mar (JJ) and 2 females with grackles at BOL 22 Mar 
(LE). 

Brewer’s Blackbird: A rare migrant in the east, 22 were in Lancaster Co 12 Apr 
(LE) and one was there 13 Apr (AG,BG). 

Common Grackle: Typical of first arrivals was a single at a feeder as far north as 
Dixon Co 2 Mar (JJ). 

Great-tailed Grackle: Males were on territories near North Platte by 18 Apr (TJW). 

Brown-headed Cowbird: As with Common Grackle, first arrivals are singles at 
feeders; one such was in Lincoln 3 Mar (LE). Most arrive in Apr; “thousands” 
were in Nuckolls Co 20 Apr (DE) and a flock of 450 was in Cass Co 2 Apr 
(CNK). 

Orchard Oriole: Routine reports. 

Baltimore Oriole: Routine reports. 

Bullock’s Oriole: There are few records east of the Panhandle, and so of interest was 
a singing male seen well in Arthur Co 20 May (CNK). 

Purple Finch: Last reported was a female at a Bellevue feeder 9 Apr (ARy). 

House Finch: Routine reports. 

Red Crossbill: The only reports were of singles in the Wildcat Hills, Scotts Bluff 
Co, 12 and 26 May (AK). 

Common Redpoll: The only report was of a male which reappeared after an absence 
at a feeder in se. Wayne Co 15-16 Mar (JJ). 

Pine Siskin: Only moderate numbers were reported, best counts 25-30 nearGering 

29 Mar-5 Apr (AK). One at a feeder in Dixon Co 29-30 May (JJ) was a 
surprise; nesting can occur almost anywhere, but usually after winters with 
targe numbers present. 

Lesser Goldfinch: One was reported at Wildcat Hills NC by a visitor 25 May (fide 
AK); no details were provided. The sighting does fit the pattern of previous 
late May arrivals in the west. 

American Goldfinch: Routine reports. 

House Sparrow: Routine reports. 



Vol. 75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


il 


A PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF SOUTHEAST NEBRASKA 
GRASSLAND HABITAT AND POTENTIAL 
HENSLOW’S SPARROW HABITAT 

W. Ross Silcock 
P.O. Box 57 
Tabor, IA 51653 
712-629-5865 
sUcock@rosssilcock.com 


INTRODUCTION 

The decline in numbers of Hens low’s Sparrows in North America (Sauer et 
al. 2001) is generally considered to be due to reduction in the extent of its preferred 
breeding habitat, “relatively large fields consisting of tall, dense grass, a well- 
developed litter layer, standing dead vegetation, and sparse or no woody vegetation”. 
(Herkert et al. 2002). Since 1985, however, the Conservation Reserve Program 
(CRP) has allowed payments to landowners by the United States Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to idle croplands and 
to seed them to various grasses. This has provided habitat that appears to have 
stabilized Henslow’s Sparrow numbers in some parts of the breeding range (Herkert 
1997; Herkert et al. 2002; Reinking 2002; McCoy 2000). Nebraska has 472,000 
hectares (1,166,000 acres) of CRP grassland, about four times more than the 
remaining area of tailgrass prairie (Steinauer and Collins 1996), but most is aging, 
unmanaged, and less attractive to most grassland birds (Negus 2005). 

To better understand the occurrence of Henslow’s Sparrow in Nebraska, we 
surveyed grasslands south and east of Lincoln from May to August 2006. The 
survey goals were to search for grassland sites that might provide suitable nesting 
habitat, count Henslow’s Sparrows at each site, and use point counts to estimate 
abundance of Henslow’s Sparrows in this region. 


METHODS 

Location of potential Hen slow’s Sparrow habitat 

The study area covered southeast Nebraska south and east of Lincoln, and 
included all of Otoe, Johnson, Nemaha, Pawnee, and Richardson Counties, the 
eastern edge of Gage County, and the southeastern comer of Lancaster County 
(Figure 1). This area contains a large number of noncontiguous grasslands of varying 
quality. The largest tailgrass prairie tract in the study area contains some 1400 
hectares (3460 acres) in and around Burchard Lake WMA, but is of “fairly low 
quality”, with “very low forb diversity” and “common to abundant cool season 
grasses” (Steinauer 2003). Geographic Information System (GIS) data layers 
representing grassland tracts greater than 20 hectares (50 acres) in die study area were 
provided by Andy Bishop (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Grand Island). In 
addition, maps of CRP-Managed Access Program (CRP-MAP) areas for each county 
were used to locate grassland tracts. 




The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol.7S No. 2 


H 



FIGURE 1. 2006 study area (shaded) in southeast Nebraska. 


1 stratified sites as suitable or unsuitable by starting with 279 grassland 
tracts and then deductively eliminating sites judged as having a lower likelihood of 
having Henslow’s Sparrows. This was done by examining each site from county 
roads. Sites were judged as unsuitable simply by noting the absence of standing 
dead material (dead grasses from previous summers), a key breeding habitat 
requirement of Henslow’s Sparrow. In most cases this process was straightforward, 
as such grasslands were grazed, hayed, or burned during die previous summer or 
early spring just prior to the evaluation. Sites that had extensive encroachment by 
woody plants such as Eastern Red-Cedar (Juniperus virginiana ), small trees such as 
Green Ash (Oleaceae Jraxinus ), dense stands of weeds, or sites with homogeneous 
stands of European Smooth Brome (Bromus inermis ) were also judged unsuitable. 

Clearly, this stratification process depends heavily on the judgment of the 
observer regarding Henslow’s Sparrow habitat, and thus introduces bias into the 
results. This search was designed as a pilot study to obtain baseline information 
regarding Henslow’s Sparrow numbers and distribution; resources were not available 
for a complete search of every site. 


Data collection 

Two types of data were collected: 1) simple counts of Henslow’s Sparrows 
found at each location during walk-in inspections, and 2) data derived from point 
counts. Walk-in inspections involved searching the entire site for areas of suitable 
habitat for singing birds and observing behavior of any birds found. Wherever 
Henslow’s Sparrows were found, the location was recorded using a handheld Global 
Positioning System (GPS), and the area around the birds was checked for extent of 
occupation and simple counts of singing Henslow’s. In July and August, sites with 
Henslow's Sparrows as well as additional sites without sparrows were selected 






Vol.75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


21 


randomly from a list of 49 sites (see RESULTS) and were checked using point 
counts. These counts were conducted at least twice during the breeding season, 
ending in mid-August. 

Point transects were arranged systematically along straight lines within each 
grassland tract. Points were located at least 90 meters (220 feet) from field 
perimeters on a grid and points were placed along gridlines 180 meters (440 feet) 
apart. I recorded alt birds during a four minute count Counts were not run, 
however, if wind was generally above about 25 km (16 miles) per hour, or the 
temperature rose above 29 s Celsius (84* Fahrenheit). 


RESULTS 

Grassland Tract Selection 

A total of 279 grassland sites were investigated for potential Henslow’s 
Sparrow breeding habitat. Sixty-three sites were judged as suitable. After obtaining 
permission from landowners, many of these 63 sites were checked on foot. Within 
each site, all parts of the site that were judged as potentially suitable habitat were 
searched carefiilly for Henslow’s Sparrows. During this process, the list of 63 sites 
was reduced to 49, usually because of minimal or absent ground litter cover or high 
content of clover or alfalfa, features not readily visible from the earlier roadside 
evaluations. A few were not checked for lack of landowner permission. The final 49 
sites were distributed among the counties as follows: 2 in Otoe, l in Lancaster, 8 in 
Gage, 13 in Johnson, 17 in Pawnee, 8 in Richardson, and none in Nemaha. 


Sites with Henslow’s Sparrows 

Only 2 grassland sites had Henslow’s Sparrows by mid-August that could be 
presumed to have bred, and only 5 of the 49 sites deemed suitable had Henslow’s 
Sparrows at all. Of these 5 sites, 2 had Henslow’s Sparrows only in the spring, 
heavy grazing in July eliminated the sparrows at another, and by August only 2 sites 
still held Henslow’s Sparrows. A total of 45 birds was observed at the 5 sites 
(Table 1); 18 of these were found on point counts and the remainder were found 
white the observer was walking between points or during searches conducted in May 
and June. 


Sites 1 and 2, located 5 miles north and 2 miles west of Tecumseh and 5.5 
miles south and 5 miles west of Tecumseh respectively, had sparrows in late May 
and early June, but these had gone by mid-July. These birds may have been 
migrants. Habitat at both sites appeared unchanged in mid-July except for normal 
growth; due to dry conditions in the study area, growth was minimal, however. Site 
1 was hayed sometime after mid-July and before mid-August, but, as already noted, 
the sparrows had probably departed prior to haying. 

Site 5, Pawnee Prairie WMA, also had sparrows in early June and 2 were 
still present July 9 at the same places as in early June; a complete search was not 
done July 9, however, as aggressive bulls were in the area. A large number of cattle 





The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol.75 No. 2 





FIGURE 2. Grassland tracts >20 hectares (50 acres) in southeast Nebraska in dark 
gray; visited tracts are in light gray; numbers indicate sites where Henslow’s 
Sparrows were found in 2006. 


was present by mid-July, when the unbumed south part of the WMA containing the 
sparrows was grazed and trampled. No Henslow’s Sparrows were present 16 July, 
presumably as their habitat had been destroyed. 

Sites 3 and 4, located 4 miles north and one mile east of the east edge of 
Table Rock and 5.5 miles south and one mile east of Crab Orchard respectively, had 
sparrows from early June through mid-August (Site 3 was not checked in early 
June). Interestingly, numbers of sparrows increased at both sites, with mid-August 
counts of 11 at Site 3 and 10 at Site 4. These were all singing males, and thus the 
increase was not attributable to the presence of juveniles. At both sites, the areas 
occupied in mid-July were expanded in mid-August, rather than new areas within the 
overall site being established. Similar increases in late summer have been observed 
previously at major sites in Kansas (Zimmerman 1993) and Oklahoma (Reinking et 
aL 2000), and are possibly examples of conspeciftc attraction (Ahlering and Faaborg 
2006), a phenomenon previously noted in Baird’s Sparrow (Ahlering 2005) and 
other grassland birds (Green et ai. 2002). 

Interestingly, all Henslow’s Sparrows found in this study were at or near the 
highest elevation within each site; none were found in draws or low areas. This 
finding is similar to that of Negus (2005), who found Henslow’s Sparrows on 
hilltops where vegetation was less dense than in valleys. 





Vol. 75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


i2 


TABLE 1. Counts of Henslow’s Sparrows at 5 sites 29 May-13 August 2006, 


Countv 

Site 

29 Mav 

2-3 June 

16 & 22 Julv 

13 Aug 

Max count 

Johnson 

1 

8 

5 

0 

0 

8 

Johnson 

2 

X 

9 

0 

X 

9 

Pawnee 

3 

X 

X 

4 

11 

11 

Pawnee 

4 

X 

2 

4 

10 

10 

Pawnee 

5 

X 

7 

0 

0 

7 






Total 

45 


X = no count 


DISCUSSION 

Henslow’s Sparrows were found at only five sites during the survey. While 
some Henslow’s Sparrows were certainly not detected because of survey limitations, 
it is apparent that the species is neither common nor widespread in southeast 
Nebraska. The relatively small number of fields possessing suitable habitat is likely 
the primary factor limiting the number of Henslow’s Sparrows in this region. 
Improvement of conservation lands for Henslow’s Sparrow will likely benefit an 
entire suite of grassland birds. 

Although habitat preferences of Henslow’s Sparrow are well known (Herkert 
et al. 2002), there are two major problems in determining management of grasslands 
in order to enhance numbers of breeding birds, especially in Nebraska, where most 
grasslands are privately-owned. These are (1) low site fidelity, and (2) the 
disjunction of the usually-practiced annual grassland management procedures with 
the longer-term changes necessary for development of suitable habitat. 

In many cases involving preservation or management of habitat for certain 
bird species, the target bird species return each year to the same site. This is 
generally not true for grassland birds, most notably Henslow’s Sparrow (Herkert et 
al. 2002; Reinking et al. 2000). Thus there is no guarantee that effort and expense 
spent maintaining what might appear to be suitable breeding habitat will be rewarded 
if the birds do not return. Of interest in this respect were experiments carried out 
with Baird’s Sparrows in North Dakota (Ahlering 2005). Because of strong 
conspecific attraction in grassland sparrows, some sites are abandoned as birds 
gravitate to areas occupied by experienced birds that continue to sing and thus attract 
conspecifics well into the breeding season. This effect may have occurred in this 
study as well. Ahlering (2005) found that Baird’s Sparrows could be attracted to 
areas of suitable but unoccupied habitat by playing taped songs. These taped songs 
attracted birds that then bred successfully. Because only a small percentage of 
Nebraska grasslands are in public hands and presumably more amenable to 
management for Henslow’s Sparrows, this technique might allow the use of fewer 
sites or possibly smaller areas of managed grassland to maintain or enhance existing 
numbers of Henslow’s Sparrows. 













The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 2 


2E. 


Of course, the technique described above is still dependent on existence of 
suitable habitat, albeit somewhat less of it. Grassland management techniques for 
Henslow’s Sparrow arc well-known and may be summarized as follows (extracted 
from Herkert 1998, revised 2002): 

(1) provide at least 25 hectares (60 acres) of contiguous grassland, more if not 
within a grasslands landscape, 

(2) avoid disturbance (burning, mowing) on an annual basis, 

(3) leave occupied grasslands undisturbed 15 April-15 September, 

(4) provide dense and tall (>5 feet) grassy vegetation, 

(5) remove woody vegetation taller than the grassy vegetation, 

(6) native grasses and forbs should comprise at least part of the vegetation 
mix. 

Most grassland managers achieve these objectives by inter-seeding desired 
species and using prescribed bums on a rotating basis. A grassland should be 
divided into at feast three equal areas, one burned each year. This allows at least two 
years of undisturbed growth, which provides sufficient standing dead stalks and 
ground litter to attract Henslow’s Sparrows, as well as limiting encroachment of 
woody vegetation. The management techniques listed above suggest at least 25 
hectares (60 acres) of contiguous grassland is required for Henslow’s Sparrow use, 
but the exact figure is not well-characterized (Herkert 1998, revised 2002). If 
rotational burning is used, it would be advisable to use a total minimum area of 
about 80 hectares (200 acres), divided into 3 parts, to meet the minimum suggested. 
A recent modification of rotational burning, called patch bum grazing (PBG; 
Fuhlendorf and Engle 2001, Vermeire et at. 2004) attempts to mimic historical 
modification of prairies by lightning-caused fires and bison grazing. It involves 
rotational burning as described above, but grazing cattle are allowed access to the 
entire area, but spend most of their time in the most recently-burned sections. This 
practice promotes grassland heterogeneity, which in turn allows the entire suite of 
native grassland species to coexist in the area (Fuhlendorf et al. 2006). 

Since 1985, setting aside significant areas of poorer-quality cropland and 
seeding them to grassland in the Federal (USDA) CRP program has provided an 
opportunity to provide more habitat for Henslow’s Sparrows. Initially, fields in the 
program were seeded to homogeneous stands of European Smooth Brome combined 
with various legumes (Negus 2005); such fields, if unmodified, are not attractive to 
Henslow’s Sparrows. Indeed, of more than 45,000 hectares (111,200 acres) of CRP 
grassland enrolled in Gage, Johnson, and Pawnee Counties in 1986-1993, more than 
80% was planted to European Smooth Brome (Taylor 2000). This increase of brome 
grassland has possibly resulted in increases of Greater Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus 
cupido) (Taylor 2000), but has likely had limited benefit for the Henslow’s 
Sparrows, other grassland birds, and other native organisms. 

An important modification of the CRP mles involved generous incentive 
payments for “mid-contract management”, which encouraged mowing, grazing, 
burning, or disking/interseeding to promote habitat diversity (Negus 2005). These 
practices must be used at least once during the CRP contract, but only on a 
maximum of one-thud of a field in any one year (Negus 2005). Interseeding CRP 
fields with native species as part of mid-contract management seems to have 



VoL 75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


ifi 


improved attractiveness of CRP grasslands to Henslow’s Sparrows. This study has 
shown that numbers of Henslow’s Sparrows will utilize such fields. Indeed, in this 
study the only two sites (sites 3 and 4 in Table l) with Henslow’s Sparrows by mid- 
August were CRP grasslands with significant native grass species present. 

Most remaining tallgrass prairie in Nebraska is in private ownership and is 
managed for grazing or haying; such grasslands are generally not attractive to 
Henslow’s Sparrows. Sullivan (2005) studied the use of such prairies by grassland 
birds in Pawnee County and the Denton Hills, just southwest of Lincoln, the latter 
area including Spring Creek Prairie. Prairies were ranked according to their natural 
purity with the highest ranking assigned to sites with little exotic invasion, high 
diversity, and high-quality forbs, Henslow’s Sparrows were found at three locations 
(Burchard Lake WMA, Pawnee Prairie WMA, and Spring Creek Prairie) and at 
private grasslands adjacent to them. Analysis of vegetation at these sites and 
comparison with sites that did not have Henslow’s Sparrows showed Henslow’s 
Sparrows preferred sites with greater titter depth and standing residue. This 
comports with previously published information (Herkert et al. 2002). 

Analysis of Sullivan’s data shows no significant differences between 
Henslow’s Sparrow habitat on public lands and that on adjacent private lands, 
although it was noted by Sullivan that Henslow’s Sparrows found on private 
grassland adjacent to the west side of Burchard Lake NWR occupied pasture with 
“abundant grass and forb cover”, suggesting that the grasslands studied were 
generally lightly grazed. Such light grazing is unusual on privately-owned 
grasslands, although studies in Missouri have shown that Henslow’s Sparrows will 
use lightly grazed (>30.4 cm vegetation height) pastures (Skinner 1975). 


CONCLUSION 

This study found that availability of suitable habitat is a major factor 
limiting the range and numbers of Henslow's Sparrows in Nebraska. Even if the 
relatively limited areas of publicly-owned prairies were managed for the full suite of 
grassland birds, including Henslow’s Sparrow, the total available area would still be 
small. It is obvious that the greatest potential lies in managing privately-owned 
grazed grasslands for the benefit of the grassland-bird suite. Clearly, current 
management systems will not change unless improved economics and long-term 
benefits to grassland quality can be demonstrated. Fortunately, research on patch 
bum grazing is showing great promise in fulfilling these requirements. We urge 
grassland managers to give patch bum grazing techniques serious consideration. 


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

We thank Joel Jorgensen for providing technical and GIS assistance and 
Andy Bishop for providing GIS data that were used for this survey. This study was 
funded by Nebraska Game and Parks with State Wildlife Grant money. 



The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol.75 No. 2 




LITERATURE CITED 

Ahlering, M.A. “Settlement Cues and Resource Use by Grasshopper Sparrows and 
Baird's Sparrows in the Upper Great Plains,” Ph.D. dissertation, University 
of Missouri, Columbia, 2005, 

Ahlering, M.A., and J. Faaborg, “Avian Habitat Management Meets Conspecific 
Attraction: If You Build It, Will They Comer’ The Auk 123 (2006): 301- 
312. 

Fuhlendorf, S.D., and D,M, Engle. “Restoring Heterogeneity on Rangelands: 
Ecosystem Management Based on Evolutionary Grazing Patterns.” 
BioScience 51 (2001): 625-632. 

Fuhlendorf, S.D., W.C. Harrell, D.M, Engle, R.G. Hamilton, C.A. Davis, and 
D.M. Leslie, Jr.. “Should Heterogeneity be the Basis for Conservation? 
Grassland Bird Response to Fire and Grazing.” Ecological Applications 16 
(2006): 1706-1716. 

Green, M. T., P. E. Lowther, S. L. Jones, S. K. Davis, and B. C. Dale. 

“Baird’s Sparrow ( Ammodramus bairdii ).” The Birds of North America , No. 
638 (A. Poole and F. Gill, eds,), Philadelphia, PA: The Birds of North 
America, Inc,, 2002. 

Herkert, J.R. “Population Trends of the Henslow’s Sparrow in Relation to the 
Conservation Reserve Program in Illinois, 1975-1995.” Journal of Field 
Ornithology 68 (1997): 235-244. 

Herkert, J.R. Effects of Management Practices on Grassland Birds: Henslow’s 
Sparrow , Jamestown, ND: Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, 1998, 
revised 2002. 

Herkert, J.R., P.D, Vickery, and D.E. Kroodsma. “Henslow’s Sparrow 
(Ammodramus henslowii ),” The Birds of North America , No. 672 (A. 
Poole and F. Gill, eds.). Philadelphia, PA: The Birds of North America, 
Inc., 2002. 

McCoy, T.D. “Effects of Landscape Composition and Multi-scale Habitat 
Characteristics on the Grassland Bird Community.” Ph.D. dissertation. 
University of Missouri, Columbia, 2000. 

Mollhoff, W.J. The Nebraska Breeding Bird Atlas 1984-1989 . Nebraska 
Ornithologists’ Union Occ, Papers No, 7. Nebraska Technical Series No. 
20, Lincoln: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2001. 

Negus, L.P. “Grassland Bird Response to Disking/Interseeding of Legumes in 
Conservation Reserve Program Lands in Northeast Nebraska.” M.Sc. thesis, 
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, 2005, 

Reinking, D.L. “A Closer Look: Henslow’s Sparrow.” Birding 34 (2002): 146-153. 

Reinking, D.L., D.A. Weidenfeld, D.H. Wolfe, and R.W. Rohrbaugh Jr. 
“Distribution, Habitat Use, and Nesting Success of Henslow’s Sparrows in 
Oklahoma.” Prairie Naturalist 32 (2000): 219-232. 

Sauer, J.R., J.E. Hines, and J. Fallon. The North American Breeding Bird Survey, 
results and analysis 1966-2000. Version 2001.2. Laurel, MD: Patuxent 
Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, 2001. <http://www.mbr- 
pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/bbs,html>. 

Schneider, R„ M. Humpert, K. Stoner, and G. Steinauer. The Nebraska Natural 
Legacy Project. Lincoln: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2005. 

Sharpe, R.S., W.R. Silcock, and J.G, Jorgensen. The Birds of Nebraska, Their 
Distribution and Temporal Occurrence. Lincoln: University of Nebraska 
Press, 2001, 



Vol. 75 No. 2 _The Nebraska Bird Review_£1 


Siicock, W. R. and J. G. Jorgensen. “Henslow’s Sparrow Status in Nebraska”. The 
Nebraska Bird Review 75(2007): 13-16. 

Steinauer, R.F. Survey for Priority Natural Communities in Nebraska. Final 
Report. Lincoln: Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2003. 

Steinauer, E.M, and S.L. Collins. “Prairie Ecology- The Tallgrass Prairie". Pages 
39-52 in F.B. Samson and F.L. Knopf, eds. Prairie Conservation: 
Preserving North America's Most Endangered Ecosystem. Washington, DC: 
island Press, 1996. 

Sullivan, S. Ecological Community Inventory- BCR 22. Summary Report for 2004 
Field Season. Lincoln; Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, 2005. 
Taylor, J.S. Greater Prairie-Chicken in southeast Nebraska: An Overview of 
Population Status and Management Considerations. Lincoln: Nebraska 
Game and Parks Commission, 2000. 

Vermeire, L.T., R.B. Mitchell, S.D. Fuhlendorf, and R.L. Gillen. “Patch Burning 
Effects on Grazing Distribution". Journal of Range Management 57 (2004): 
248-252. 

Zimmerman, J.L. The Birds of Konza. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1993. 


Remembering Sue Amiotte, Mildred Gross and Izen Ratziaff 

This past spring the NOU lost three longtime members whose contributions 
to the organization are noteworthy. 

In March, Amelia "Sue" Amiotte passed 
away in Kearney. Bom in 1942, Sue grew up in 
rural Dawes County, attended Crawford High 
School and received a B.A. in education from 
Chadron State College. She later attended the 
University of Nebraska at Lincoln and received an 
M.A. in counseling. She worked as a vocational 
rehabilitation counselor for many years and 
eventually returned to the Chadron area to open her 
own business in mental health and workman's 
compensation counseling. When she could take 
time from her busy schedule. Sue enjoyed reading, 
needlework, camping, gardening, and, of course, 
birding. 

Sue served as Treasurer of the NOU from 
1998 to 2000 and was a regular at our meetings for 
many years. Her reports of sightings from the 
Panhandle were a welcome feature on NEBirds. 

She will be remembered for her easy smile and sense of humor. Sue was an 
enthusiastic birder and loved to go to new places and find birds she had not seen 
before. Her sister Betty reports that the two of them took a trip to Florida a few 
years ago, where Sue was delighted to add some southern species to her life list. 

Sue will be missed by all who knew her, and especially by her fellow 
birders in western Nebraska. She is survived by her son Andrew and sister Betty. 



Sue Amiotte 





The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 2 


& 


In April, we lost another loyal member 
in the person of Mildred Gross, Mildred was bom 
in 1920 and, with her husband Everett, was a 
familiar sight at NOU meetings for decades. 
Everett says that they had long been interested in 
birds but didn’t get binoculars or discover the 
existence of the NOU until about 1966. Mildred 
served as President of the NOU in 1970. 

Mildred was bom at Rokeby, Nebraska, 
and graduated as valedictorian from Kearney High 
School in 1938. She attended Kearney State 
Teachers' College and graduated with a double 
major in chemistry and education. While raising 
their three children, she and Everett both began 
graduate studies and in 1963 Mildred became the 
first woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics from 
the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Mildred 
went on to teach math at Doane College in Crete 
for 25 years. 

In addition to her keen interest in all facets of the natural world, especially 
birds, Mildred was an avid musician. Her primaiy instrument was the piano, but 
she also played the organ, bassoon, clarinet and oboe. She played in several 
community orchestras and bands and was a church organist on and off for most of 
her adult life. Mildred is survived by her husband Everett, daughter Donna, and two 
sons, Daniel and Damon. 

In May, Izen Ratzlaff lost her battle with 
cancer. She was bom in 1938 in Valentine. She 
received her RN degree at Nebraska Methodist 
Hospital in 1961 and married Neal the same year. 

She practiced nursing in Omaha, Kansas City and 
the Republic of the Congo. A gifted artist, she 
also received degrees in fine arts and art history 
from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. 

One can hardly think of the NOU in 
recent years without thinking of a Ratzlaff 
contribution: members since 1979, Neal was 
President from 1994 to 1996 and continues to 
volunteer in many capacities, while Izen acted as 
the unofficial photographer, welcomer and general 
oiler-of-squeaky-wheels at NOU meetings. Her 
many albums of photos serve to chronicle our 
yearly meetings and field trips. According to 
Neal, she actually liked the people in the NOU 
more than she liked the birding. That affection 
was abundantly returned by the members of the NOU. Izen is survived by husband 
Neal, daughter Rebecca and son and daughter-in-law Mark and Karen. 




Mildred Gross 



Vol.75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


& 


Annual Meeting at North Platte 

The 108th Annual Meeting of the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union was held 
in North Platte at the Sandhills Convention Center/Quality Inn on May 18-20, 
2007. Field trips to surrounding counties for the 60 members and friends in 
attendance were organized by T. J. Walker and led by Robin Harding, Lanny 
Randolph, Wayne Mollhoff and T. J. Walker. 

Friday evening's speaker was John Sidle, Threatened and Endangered 
Species Specialist with the United States Forest Service in Chadron, who spoke 
about efforts to monitor populations of Burrowing Owls and associated species, such 
as Ferruginous Hawks and Black-footed Ferrets. 

Saturday evening. Dr. Josef Kren, a professor in the Health Science College 
at Bryan LGH Medical Center in Lincoln, gave a presentation on the neurobiology 
of bird song: how and why birds sing, calls vs. songs, how information gets from 
the brain to the vocal chords. 


NOU 2007 Annual Meeting - North Platte 



Custer 

Lincoln 

1 

McPherson 

Hayes 

Frontier 

Arthur 

Canada Goose 


X 


X 




Trumpeter Swan 



X 




X 

Wood Duck 

X 

X 



X 



Gadwall 


X 

X 

X 



X 

American Wigeon 



X 

X 




Mallard 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



Blue-winged Teal 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Northern Shoveler 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



Northern Pintail 


X 






Green-winged Teal 

X 

X 

X 

X 




Canvasback 



X 

X 




Redhead 




X 




Lesser Scaup 


X 


X 




Hooded Merganser 



X 





Ruddy Duck 

X 

X 






Ring-necked Pheasant 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Greater Prairie-Chicken 


X 






Wild Turkey 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

X 

Northern Bobwhite 


X 






Pied-billed Grebe 




X 



























































































M. 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vot.75 No. 2 


NOU 2007 Annual Meeting - North Platte 



Custer 

Lincoln 

1 

McPherson 

Hayes 

Frontier 

Arthur 

Eared Grebe 

X 

X 



X 



Western Grebe 


X 


X 



X 

Clark's Grebe 

X 







American White Pelican 


X 



X 



Double-crested Cormorant 


X 



X 



American Bittern 


X 






Great Blue Heron 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



Cattle Egret 

X 







Green Heron 


X 



X 



Turkey Vulture 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Northern Harrier 

X 

X 





X 

Cooper's Hawk 


X 

X 





Swainson's Hawk 

X 

X 

X 

X 



X 

Red-tailed Hawk 

X 

X 

X 

X 



X 

American Kestrel 

X 

X 

X 



X 

X 

Virginia Rail 


X 






Sora 


X 

X 





American Coot 

X 

X 


X 



X 

Black-bellied Plover 

X 

X 

X 





Semipaimated Plover 


X 






Killdeer 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Lesser Yellowtegs 



X 


X 



Willet 





X 



Spotted Sandpiper 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Upland Sandpiper 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Long-billed Curlew 


X 


X 



X 

Marbled Godwit 

X 







Semipaimated Sandpiper 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Least Sandpiper 

X 


X 





White-ramped Sandpiper 

X 

X 






Baird's Sandpiper 



X 





Pectoral Sandpiper 


X 






Short-billed Dowitcher 


X 






Long-billed Dowitcher 


X 






Wilson's Snipe 


X 

X 





Wilson's Phalarope 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Ring-billed Gull 


X 





X 

Forster's Tem 


X 





X 

Black Tem 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Rock Pigeon 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



Eurasian Collared-Dove 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Mourning Dove 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo 


X 

























































































































Vol. 75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 




NOU 2007 Annua! Meeting - North Platte 



Custer 

Lincoln 

Logan 

McPherson 

Hayes 

Frontier 

Arthur 

Bam Owl 


X 






Great Homed Owl 


X 






Burrowing Owl 

X 

X 


X 

X 



Common Nighthawk 


X 

X 


X 

X 


Chimney Swift 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Belted Kingfisher 

X 

X 

X 





Red-headed Woodpecker 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Red-bellied Woodpecker 


X 




X 


Downy Woodpecker 

X 

X 

X 





Northern Flicker 

X 

X 

X 





Olive-sided Flycatcher 


X 






Western Wood-Pewee 


X 






Eastern Wood-Pewee 


X 






Willow Flycatcher 


X 

X 





Least Flycatcher 


X 






Eastern Phoebe 

X 

X 



X 

X 


Say's Phoebe 


X 






Great-crested Flycatcher 


X 



X 



Western Kingbird 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Eastern Kingbird 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Loggerhead Shrike 


X 

X 

X 



X 

Bell's Vireo 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 


Warbling Vireo 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Red-eyed Vireo 

X 

X 



X 



Blue Jay 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



Black-hilled Magpie 


X 






American Crow 

X 

X 

X 

X 




Homed Lark 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

Purple Martin 


X 




X 


Tree Swallow 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Northern Rough-winged Swallow 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

X 

Bank Swallow 


X 


X 




Cliff Swallow 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 


Bam Swallow 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Black-capped Chickadee 


X 



X 



White-breasted Nuthatch 

X 

X 






Rock Wren 


X 






House Wren 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Marsh Wren 


X 

X 

X 



X 

Eastern Bluebird 

X 

X 

X 



X 


Swainson's Thrush 


X 






American Robin 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Gray Catbird 


X 

X 


X 





































































The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 2 


& 


NOU 2007 Annual Meeting - North Platte 



Custer 

Lincoln 

Logan 

McPherson 

Hayes 

Frontier 

Arthur 

Northern Mockingbird 


X 

X 


X 



Brown Thrasher 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



European Starting 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

American Pipit 



X 





Cedar Waxwing 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Yellow Warbler 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

X 

American Redstart 


X 






Ovenbird 


X 






Northern Waterthrush 

X 


X 





Common Yellowthroat 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Yellow-breasted Chat 


X 






Spotted Towhee 


X 






Chipping Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 



X 


Clay-colored Sparrow 


X 


X 




Field Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 


X 



Vesper Sparrow 

X 







Lark Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Lark Bunting 


X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Grasshopper Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



Song Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 





Swamp Sparrow 


X 






Northern Cardinal 


X 

X 


X 

X 


Rose-breasted Grosbeak 


X 






Black-headed Grosbeak 


X 



X 

X 


Blue Grosbeak 


X 

X 

X 


X 


Lazuli Bunting 


X 






Indigo Bunting 


X 






Dickcissel 

X 

X 



X 



Bobolink 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Red-winged Blackbird 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Eastern Meadowlark 


X 

X 





Western Meadowlark 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Yellow-headed Blackbird 


X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Common Grackle 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Great-tailed Grackle 


X 

X 

X 


X 


Brown-headed Cowbird 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Orchard Oriole 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Baltimore Oriole 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

House Finch 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 


American Goldfinch 

X 

X 

X 



X 


House Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 










147 

77 

131 

85 

56 

66 

39 

35 













































































































Vol.75 No. 2 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


SL 


The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska 
Ornithologists’ Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in 
arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $15 in the 
United States, $18 in Canada and $30 in all other countries, payable in advance. 
Single copies are $4 each, postpaid, in the United States, $5 in Canada, and $8 
elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Lou Pritchard, NOU Librarian, do 
University of Nebraska State Museum, W-436 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588- 
0514. 

Memberships in the NOU (on a calendar-year basis only): Active, $15; 
Sustaining, $25; Student, $10; Family Active, $20; Family Sustaining, $30; Life, 
$250. Send dues and subscription requests to Betty Grenon, NOU Treasurer, (see 
address below) Contributions to the NOU are tax deductible. 

Send manuscripts and notes on bird sightings to Janis Paseka, Editor, (see 
address below) Send quarterly bird reports to Ross Sticock. (see address below) 


President and Newsletter Editor Lanny Randolph, 50370 24th Road, Gibbon, NE 
68840-4065; virginiarail@nctc.net 

Vice-President: Urban Lchncr. 15526 Pierce Circle. Omaha. NE 68144: 
urbanity@hotmaii.com 

Secretary: Kevin Poague, 379 S. 46th St„ Lincoln, NE; kpoague@audubon.org 

Treasurer. Betty Grenon, 1409 Childs Road East, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
grenon925@aol.com 

Librarian: Mary Lou Pritchard, 6325 O Street #515, Lincoln, NE 68510 

Directors : 

Loren Padelford, 1405 Little John Road, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
lpdlfrd@juno.com (2008) 

Steve Lamphere, 3101 Washington St, Apt 98, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
kingfisher65@aol.com (2009) 

Kathy DeLara, 170188 Spring Creek Road, Mitchell, NE 69357; 
renosmom@charter.net (2010) 

Records Committee Chairman: Mark Brogie, Box 316, Creighton, NE 68729; 
mbrogie@esui.org 

Editor of The Nebraska Bird Review : Janis Paseka, 1585 Co. Rd. 14 Btvd., Ames, 
NE 68621; paseka76@gmail.com 

Occurrence Report Compiler: RossSilcock, P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653; 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 

Breeding Bird Atlas Project and Nest Records Coordinator Wayne Mollhoff, 

2354 Euclid St, Ashland NE 68003; wmolIhofif@netscape.net 

NOU Website: http://rip.physics.unk.edu/NOU/ 


Nebraska Birdline: do Josef Kren 402*721-5487, ext 6490, or 
800-642-8382, ext 6490, orbirdsne@yahoo.com 












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Nebraska Bird Review (September 2007) 75(3), WHOLE ISSUE. Copyright 2007 Nebraska Ornithologists’ 
Union. Used by permission. 


The Nebraska Bird 
Review 

A Magazine of Ornithology of the 
Nebraska Region 

Volume 75 September 2007 Number 3 



Published by the 

Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc. 
Founded 1899 


Janis M. Paseka, Editor 
Stephen J. Dinsmore, Co-editor 


SSSN 0028-1816 



2a 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol.75 No. 3 


SUMMER FIELD REPORT, June-July 2007 
Compiled by W. Ross Silcock 
P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 


INTRODUCTION 

This summer was a “something for everyone” season. Ecologists, already excited 
by the apparent ability of Greater Prairie-Chickens to lek in improbable habitats, 
such as com fields and dirt edges of Rainwater Basin playas, will welcome the use 
by Lark Buntings and Vesper Sparrows of wheat stubble fields with a growing com 
crop. The Vesper Sparrows of the east, a different subspecies from those in the north 
and west, have been at the mercy of full-tillage cropping systems, but now have a 
reprieve and may even be increasing because of no-till and minimum tillage methods 
currently in vogue due to high fuel prices and conservation benefits. 

White-faced Ibis again nested in several places, and Red-shouldered Hawk is 
showing signs of expanding from its limited range at Fontenelle Forest. Very 
exciting was the confirmation of breeding for the first time in Nebraska of Ash- 
throated Flycatcher, only the second record of the species’ occurrence in the state. 
Hopefully confirmation is soon to follow for Broad-tailed Hummingbird, which has 
now twice been reported during the breeding season. 

A phenomenon that may be applicable to those early migrant passerines that 
appear well before local breeders seem to have finished breeding and have even 
contemplated migration, is molt-migration. A recent article in Birding 
http;//www,americanbirding,org/pubs/birding/archives/voi39no3p34to40.pdf 

discusses this strategy for such species as Dusky Flycatcher, Warbling Vireo, 
Western Tanager, Lazuli Bunting, and Bullock's Oriole, which is probably best 
known for its early departure from breeding areas for an intermediate staging area 
where it molts, then continues to its wintering grounds. The possibility was raised 
by Ted Floyd that Chipping Sparrow might be in this group as well. 

Unfortunately, other Ilian the existence of many such rather early fall records 
for various species in areas where breeding does not occur, Nebraska has little data to 
support or contradict this idea. Observers should continue to report obvious 
indications of early fall movement (flocking, appearance out of breeding habitat, 
disappearance of adults). 


ABBREVIATIONS 

ADF: Arbor Day Farm, Nebraska City; 

BBS: Breeding Bird Survey; 

BOL: Branched Oak L, Lancaster Co; 

Cem: Cemetery; 

CLNWR: Crescent L NWR, Garden Co; 

FF: Fontenelle Forest, Sarpy Co; 

HCR: Harlan Co Res, Harlan Co; 

ICSP: Indian Cave SP, Nemaha/Richardson Cos; 
LM: L McConaughy, Keith Co; 

LO: L Ogallala, Keith Co; 
m.ob.: many observers; 




Vol. 75 No. 3 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


21 


NLB: North Lake Basin WMA, Seward Co; 

NWR: National Wildlife Refuge; 

Res: Reservoir, 

RWB: Rainwater Basin, south-central and southeast Nebraska; 
SCP: (Audubon) Spring Creek Prairie, Lancaster Co; 

SHP: State Historical Park; 

SL: Sewage Lagoon(s); 

SP: State Park; 

SRA: State Recreation Area; 

WMA: (State) Wildlife Management Area; 

WPA: (Federal) Waterfowl Production Area; 

WSR: Wind Springs Ranch, Sioux Co. 


GAZETTEER 

Calamus Res: SRA/WMA, Loup/Garfield Cos; 
Funk Lagoon: WPA, Phelps Co; 

Harvard Marsh: WPA, Clay Co; 

Monroe Canyon: Sioux Co; 

Oliver Res: SRA, Kimball Co; 

Sowbelly Canyon: Sioux Co. 


OBSERVERS 

AK: Alice Kenitz, Gering; 

AR: Arlys Reitan, Lincoln; 

B&DW: Bruce and Donna Walgren, Casper, WY; 
BB: Bart Bly, Alliance; 

BG: Betty Grenon, Bellevue; 

CG: Carey Grell, Lincoln; 

CH: Carolyn Hall, Bassett; 

CNK: Clem N. Klaphake, Bellevue; 

CWH: C.W. Huntley, Ogallala; 

D&CN: Don & Colleen Noecker, Albion; 

D&JP: Don & Jan Paseka, Ames; 

D&RK: Dennis and Rhalene Katus, Bayard; 

DK: Dan Kim, Wood River; 

DL: Dan Leger, Lincoln; 

G&WH: Glen & Wanda Hoge, Alma; 

HKH: Helen K. Hughson, Mitchell; 

J&LP: Janis and LeRoy Poppe, Scribner; 

JG: Joe Gubanyi, Seward; 

JGJ: Joel G. Jorgensen, Lincoln; 

JJ: Jan Johnson, Wakefield; 

JM: Jeanne Miller, Bennington; 

JMc: John McCarty, Omaha; 

JMu: Jerry Mulliken, Nickerson; 

JR: Justin Rink, Omaha; 



11 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 3 


JWH: John W. Hall, Omaha; 

KD: Kathy DeLara, Mitchell; 

KP: Kevin Poague, Lincoln; 

KS: Kent Skaggs, Kearney; 

L&BP: Loren and Babs Padelford, Bellevue; 

L&CF: Larry & Carol Falk, Nebraska City; 

LB: Laurel Badura, Kearney; 

LE: Larry Einemann, Lincoln; 

LR: Lanny Randolph, Gibbon; 

MB: Mark Brogie, Creighton; 

MT: Martha Tacha, Lincoln; 

MU: Mark Urwiller, Kearney; 

PD: Paul Dunbar, Hastings; 

PR: Paul Roisen, Sioux City, IA; 

RE: Rick Eades, Lincoln; 

RG: Ruth Green, Bellevue; 

RH: Robin Harding, Gibbon; 

RM: Robert Manning, Omaha; 

RS: Rick Schmid, Omaha; 

SJD: Stephen J. Dinsmore, Ames, IA; 

SM: Steve Morris, Grand Island; 

SR: Sarah Rehme, Seward; 

TH: Tim Hajda, Broken Bow; 

TJW: T.J. Walker, Brady; 

TP: Theresa Pester, Walton; 

WM: Wayne Mollhoff, Ashland; 

WRS: W. Ross Silcock, Tabor, IA. 

SPECIES ACCOUNTS 

Greater White-fronted Goose: Summer stragglers are rare, but one was in Clay Co 
17 Jun (JGJ). 

Snow Goose: About 25 stragglers or non-migrants were found; largest group was 20 
at Harvard Marsh 2 Jun (PD), and westerly, where rare, was one at LM 10 
Jun (SJD). 

Ross’s Goose: One at LM 9 Jun (SJD) was only the 3rd Jun record. 

Canada Goose: Routine reports. 

Trumpeter Swan: Routine reports. 

Wood Duck: Routine reports. 

Gadwall: Routine reports. 

American Wigeon: A male at LM 9 Jun (SJD) was likely a late migrant; breeding 
is not known there. 

Mallard: There is little information on timing of molt to eclipse in Nebraska; thus 
of interest was a male molting near North Platte 9 Jul (TJW). 

Blue-winged Teal: Routine reports. 

Cinnamon Teal: One at Funk Lagoon 3 Jul (KS) was unexpected, although recent 
years have seen increased reports from the RWB. 

Northern Shoveler: Routine reports. 

Northern Pintail: Routine reports. 



Vol. 75 No. 3 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


73 


Green-winged Teal: Sightings in Jun-Jul away from the Sandhills are unexpected, 
but earliest molt-migrants could appear in Jun. Most Jun-Jul sightings 
away from the Sandhills are from the RWB; 5 were at NLB 10 Jun (JGJ) 
and another at Funk Lagoon 3 Jul (KS). 

Canvasback: A male at LO 9 Jun (SJD) was probably unmated at that date and 
location. Few breed in Nebraska. 

Redhead: A nest with 12 eggs, apparently of this species based on characteristics of 
the eggs and nest site and the presence of 12 adults, was at Harvard Marsh 2 
Jun (PD); this is only about the 4th nesting record for the RWB. Scattered 
reports elsewhere included 2-5 at Alma SL 23 Jun-1 Jul (G&WH), one in 
the e. RWB 24 Jun (JGJ), and one at Funk Lagoon 3 Jul (KS). 

Ring-necked Duck: The only report was of a male in Clay Co 22 Jul (JGJ); 
summer stragglers are rare. 

Lesser Scaup: Stragglers can occur anywhere in the state during summer; one in the 
e. RWB 24 Jun (JGJ) was the latest of about 20 Jun-Jul reports there, while 
singles were in n. Cherry Co 10 Jun (a male, L&CF) and at LO the same 
day (SJD). Low numbers breed on w. Sandhills lakes. 

Hooded Merganser: The usual scattering of immatures was reported statewide (m. 
ob.); usually reported as “females/immatures”, most if not all are likely 
one-year-old birds not yet breeding. Breeding in Nebraska is rare, with 
fewer than 5 documented cases. 

Common Merganser: A few non-breeders and molt-migrants regularly occur in 
summer at LO; a male and 2 females were there 9 Jun (SJD). 

Ruddy Duck: The presence of 2 broods in w. Seward Co 14 Jul (JGJ) was one of 
fewer than 10 breeding records in the e. RWB. Displaying territorial males 
were seen at Deep Well WMA, Hamilton Co, 8 Jun (JGJ). 

Gray Partridge: Somewhat unpredictable in occurrence in its ne. and nc. Nebraska 
range, the 2 birds in Dixon Co 2 Jun were tire first seen there for several 
years (JJ). 

Ring-necked Pheasant: Routine reports. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse: Routine reports. 

Greater Prairie-Chicken: Routine reports. 

Wild Turkey: A hen was flushed from a nest with 13 eggs in Nemaha Co 3 Jun 
(WRS). 

Northern Bobwhite: Two were flushed in s. Morrill Co 17 Jun; apparently 
bobwhites are recent inhabitants of this area, as a local farmer who has also 
been seeing them stated they were his “first in 40 years” (WRS). Although 
fairly common in the North and South Platte Valleys in the Panhandle, 
bobwhites are rare away from those valleys. 

Common Loon: None were reported; this species occurs regularly in summer at LO. 

Pied-billed Grebe: Good water conditions in parts of the RWB and the se. allowed 
numerous sightings of broods 9 Jun-28 Jul in Lancaster (LE), Seward 
(JGJ), York (JGJ), and Phelps (KS) Cos. Nesting was reported also from 
Sarpy Co 3 Jun (CNK). 

Red-necked Grebe: A basic adult at LM 10 Jun (SJD) provided only the 2nd Jun 
record for the state; it was likely a non-breeder. 

Eared Grebe: Easterly stragglers, which are rare in summer, included singles in 
Seward Co 10 Jun (JGJ), at Alma SL 20 Jun (G&WH), and at Funk 
Lagoon 3 Jul (KS). 




74 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 3 


Western Grebe: Best count at LM was 1198 on 10 Jun (SJD). One in York Co 8 
Jun (JGJ) was easterly, 

Clark’s Grebe: Among the 1198 Westerns at LM 10 Jun were 23 Clark’s (SJD), an 
excellent count. 

American White Pelican: Routine reports. 

Double-crested Cormorant: Some 200-250 were at LO, including 2 nests 
(JGJ,SJD); one nest was found there in Apr (MB), the first in the LM area 
since the 1940s. Summer stragglers, usually immatures, are rare in the 
southeast, but several were reported: one was in w. Seward Co 9 Jun (JGJ), 
singles were at 3 Lancaster Co locations 28 Jun-28 Jul (LE), and 2 were in 
Butler Co 12 Jul (CNK). 

American Bittern: Good numbers were found in the RWB due to good water 
conditions, a total of about 9 (JGJ,JG,KS,G&WH). 

Least Bittern: As with the previous species, sightings would be expected this year, 
even though this species is rare in Nebraska; 1-3 were found in w. Seward 
Co through the period (JG). 

Great Blue Heron: An established rookery at the Platte River in s. Sarpy Co had 
55 adults and young 1 Jun (CNK), and a new rookery near Glen at the 
opposite end of the state had 11 occupied nests 6 Jun (B&DW). These 
bring the total rookeries reported for 2007 to 5. 

Great Egret: Very few appeared this summer; none were found 29 Jul in the e. 
RWB (JGJ), usually peak time for the species there. Another active observer 
found only one in Lancaster Co during the period (LE). Best count was 
only 6, at HCR 18 Jul (G&WH). 

Snowy Egret: The only report was of a late migrant at LM 10 Jun (SJD). 

Little Blue Heron: None were reported; the first of the few that do occur arrive in 
late Jul. 

Cattle Egret: Only the 6th breeding record for the state was noted at CLNWR 19 
Jun (WM). The only other reports were of 11 “yard birds” near Ames 14 
Jun (D&JP), one at Funk Lagoon 3 Jul (KS), and one in the e. RWB 14 
Jul (JGJ). Numbers are lowest in Jun-early Jul. 

Green Heron: Routine reports. 

Black-crowned Night-Heron: Routine reports. 

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron: None were reported; a few appear in the RWB in 
late Jul most years. 

Glossy Ibis: Continuing a string of sightings in the e. RWB was one at Harvard 
Marsh with 68 White-faced Ibis 2 Jun (PD). This is Nebraska’s 16th record. 

White-faced Ibis: Although a surprising 3 nesting attempts were reported this 
summer, there are still fewer than 10 nesting records for the state. A nesting 
colony was establishing at Harvard Marsh 2 Jun, when 68 birds had 6 nests 
with 1-2 eggs each and 10 more nests were under construction; 
unfortunately cattle were added to the area and the nesting attempt failed 
(PD). Two other colonies were reported, at CLNWR 19 Jun and Avocet 
WMA, Grant Co, 23 Jun (WM); several birds were at the latter location 5 
Jul (LR,RH). Four in w. Seward Co 9 Jun (JG) and 12 in York Co the 
same day (SM) were likely late migrants, while one in Morrill Co 23 Jun 
(KD) and 4 at Funk Lagoon 3 Jul (KS) may have been non- or failed 
breeders. 

Turkey Vulture: Two nestlings were at a nest near Scribner 5 Jun (J&LP). 



Vol. 75 No. 3 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


21 


Osprey: Singles at LO 9-10 Jun (SJD), near North Bend 10 Jun (JGJ), and near 
Valley 11 Jul, the latter possibly the same as the North Bend bird (JGJ) 
were likely immatures not yet breeding. There are about 33 similar records 
10 Jun-7 Aug. 

Mississippi Kite: At a regular site was one in Ogallala 9 Jun (SJD), but another 
near Kearney 15 Jun (MU) was unexpected. Breeding is known from only 2 
sites, Ogallala and Red Cloud. 

Bald Eagle: Nebraska Game and Parks reported a record 45 nests in the state this 
year; the total for 2005 was 37 (JGJ). 

Northern Harrier: Presence of adult males in Jun is indicative of local nesting; 
males were over prairie near Sterling 3 Jun (WRS) and near Friend 9 Jun 
(LR,RH), parts of the state where breeding numbers are probably low. 

Cooper’s Hawk: Routine reports. 

Red-shouldered Hawk: One crossing the Missouri River from Iowa to Nebraska at 
Omaha 22 Jul (JR) was not far from a known breeding site at FF, but 
another in Adams Co 14 Jul (PD) continues a recent trend of sightings 
some distance from FF. A similar trend has been noted in Kansas. 

Swainson’s Hawk: Density of nesting birds in the s. Panhandle is impressive; 
100+ nests, 70+ active, were located this breeding season, most of them in 
Kimball Co (BB). A single was easterly at Wausa 28 Jun (D&JP). 

Red-tailed Hawk: A dark morph bird in Bellevue 24 Jul was the observer’s first in 
summer in 50 years (RG); this bird may have been a failed breeder on the 
move early; earliest fall dates for dark birds are in late Sep. 

Ferruginous Hawk: A good total of 30+ nests were located in the Panhandle this 
summer (BB); this compares with the estimate by the Federal Government 
in 2001 of 35 breeding pairs in the state. 

Golden Eagle: Some 20+ nests were found in the Panhandle this summer (BB). An 
adult was at a nest in Keith Co that had 3 large young 9 Jun (SJD). 

American Kestrel: Routine reports. 

Merlin: This species breeds in very small numbers on the Pine Ridge, with few 
summer reports in recent years. Thus of interest was one near Chadron 3 
Jun (RM). 

Prairie Falcon: Routine reports. 

Peregrine Falcon: Routine reports. 

Virginia Rail: Nesting may occur anywhere in the state given suitable water 
conditions; an adult with 2 chicks was seen at an expected location near 
Lakeside 5 Jul (LR,RH) but unusual was an adult with 3 chicks in w. 
Seward Co 12 Jul (CNK). Although there have been a few summer 
sightings in the RWB in recent years, this is only the 2nd confirmed 
breeding record there. 

Sora: One of few breeding records for the southeast was the discovery of an 
abandoned egg at Jack Sinn WMA, Lancaster/Saunders Cos, 9 Jun (LE). 
Late for the location was one in Nuckolls Co 2 Jun (LR,RH). 

American Coot: This was another species taking advantage of good water conditions 
to breed; nests and broods were widely-reported in the e. RWB, with eggs 
2-10 Jun (PD,JGJ), a nestling 10 Jun (JGJ), and broods 3-29 Jul (KS,JGJ). 
Less usual breeding locations were Sarpy Co, where nesting was noted 2 
Jun (CNK), and w. Custer Co, where 3 incubating birds were found 20 Jun 
(TJW). 



The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol 75 No. 3 


M. 


Sandhill Crane: The nesting pair in Morrill Co had 2 chicks 22 Jun, but one died 
of unknown causes around 25 Jul (D&RK,KD,AK). The adults arrived in 
the 3rd week of Mar and the chicks were first seen in early May (D&RK). 
This is the 3rd year this pair has nested there; one chick was raised in 2005 
(a second was apparently killed by a coyote) and two were raised in 2006 
(D&RK). Other sightings without nesting evidence were of 4 in Buffalo Co 
3 Jun (D&JP) and 3 at Valentine NWR, Cherry Co, 19 Jul (PR). 

Black-bellied Plover: None were reported; migrants usually occur into early Jun. 

American Golden-Plover: Only the 5th Jun record for this early migrant was one in 
the e. RWB 3 Jun (JGJ). 

Snowy Plover: The glory days of nesting of this species at LM seem to be over 
with higher water levels encroaching into vegetation and eliminating open 
nesting habitat. Only one bird was found there 10 Jun (SJD). However, an 
exciting discovery at the newly-cleared Dinan Memorial Tract along the 
Platte River in Buffalo Co was the two nests, each with 3 eggs, 21 Jun; at 
least one nest fledged young (MT). 

Semipalmated Plover: Second-earliest on record for fall were 2 in w. Seward Co 7 
Jul (JG). 

Piping Plover: Numbers were down from recent years at LM, but still a healthy 41 
were counted there 9 Jun (SJD) and a chick was found 3 Jun (JGJ). 
Significant were 6 adults and 2 nests at Goose L, CLNWR, 9 Jun (SJD); 
nesting in the Sandhills is unusual, with only 3-4 records of breeding in the 
last 5 years and none before that since 1917. A displaying male at Oliver 
Res 10 Jun (SJD) would add a breeding site if able to impress a mate. The 
1-2 in Sarpy Co 1-9 Jun (CNK,L&BP,JR) and again 4 Jul (CNK) may 
have come across the Missouri River from their breeding site in Iowa. 

Killdeer: AtOgallala 25 Jul chicks 1-2 days old were noted (CWH); this indicates 
eggs 22-23 Jul, a rather late date. 

Mountain Plover: The numbers of nests located by the Prairie Partners program in 
the s. Panhandle continue to amaze: 107 were found this year (BB). More 
usual were the pair noted courting near Kimball Airport 8 Jun (SJD), and 
the adult with nearly grown chick south of the airport 16 Jun (WRS). 

Black-necked Stilt: The only reports were of 2-3 at Funk Lagoon 3-13 Jul, with 2 
young present on the latter date (KS). Nesting occurred there in 2003 and 
was recorded in the e. RWB in 2005-2006. 

American Avocet: An excellent nest count for this common Sandhills breeder was 
the 45 nests (with 76 adults) at CLNWR 9 Jun (SJD). One was as far east 
as Lincoln 19 Jun (LE). 

Spotted Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Solitary Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Greater Yellowlegs: Earliest returnee was near LO 28 Jun (TJW); this species 
returns early, with earliest dates in mid-Jun. 

Willet: Uncommon in the east, the 5 in Seward Co 3 Jun (JG) were late as well. A 
“territorial” bird near St Paul 9 Jul (LB) was south and east of the usual 
summer range, but within the normal migration period, while another in 
Lancaster Co 21 Jul (LE) was a rare fall occurrence in the east. 

Lesser Yellowlegs: Last for spring was one in the e. RWB 3 Jun (JGJ) and first for 
fall was one in Morrill Co 23 Jun (KD). 

Upland Sandpiper: The 40 in a flooded hay meadow in Keith Co 20 Jun (TJW) 
was an excellent count; either they were fairly late migrants or were local 



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breeders attracted to a good food supply. Two chicks 2 weeks old were 
found in Clay Co 30 Jun (JGJ), perhaps a little late. 

Long-billed Curlew: “A few” were in sw. Lincoln Co 11 Jun (TJW) at the s. edge 
of the summer range, and a pair with a juvenile in Box Butte Co 24 Jul 
(PR) was rather late. Last one seen at WSR was 22 Jul (HKH); most leave 
breeding grounds by Aug. 

Hudsonian Godwit: The only report was of one rather late in Sarpy Co 1 Jun 
(CNK). 

Marbled Godwit: None were reported; most fall movement is in Jul. 

Sanderting: At the tail end of spring migration were 6 at LM 3 Jun (JGJ) and one 
in Sarpy Co. the same day (L&BP). 

Semipalmated Sandpiper: A late migrant in spring, 9 were in Lancaster Co 7 Jun 
(LE) and as many as 150 still in the e. RWB 3 Jun (JGJ). 

Western Sandpiper: None were reported; adults arrive in mid- to late Jul. 

Least Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

White-rumped Sandpiper: Last for spring was one at Oliver Res 16 Jun (WRS). 

Baird's Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Pectoral Sandpiper: One in w. Seward Co 7 Jul (JG) was a rather early fall 
returnee. 

Stilt Sandpiper: One in w. Seward Co 8 Jun (JG) was a bit late, while first for fall 
were “a few” at Funk Lagoon 13 Jul (KS). 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper: Arrival was rather early, with one at LBN 19 Jul (MB), 
the 2nd-earliest on record, and 10 at North Bend by 27 Jul (JGJ). 

Short-billed Dowitcher: The first dowitchers in fall are adult Short-billeds; right on 
time were 2 in the e. RWB 14 Jul (JGJ). 

Long-billed Dowitcher: Routine reports. 

Wilson’s Snipe: Sightings of singles at Jack Sinn WMA, Lancaster/Saunders Cos, 

9 Jun and 28 Jul (LE) were likely summering there; both dates are out of 
the usual migration periods for spring and fall. Snipe have been recorded 
several times during the breeding season at this location. 

American Woodcock: None were reported; this is a summer resident in the east. 

Wilson’s Phalarope: Following reports of breeding at Harvard Marsh and in 
Fillmore Co this spring, this summer in Seward Co a male was with a 
young chick 3 Jun (JGJ), distraction displays were seen 9 Jun (JG), “fresh 
juveniles” were found 30 Jun (JGJ), and 2 additional juveniles were seen 14 
Jul (JGJ). There are still very few breeding records from the RWB, most of 
them since 2000. Closer to the usual breeding range were 2 broods at LM 

10 Jun (SJD) and a brood in Morrill Co 10 Jun (SJD). Rather late for the 
east were 1 -2 through 9 Jun (CNK,L&BP). 

Red-necked Phalarope: Routine reports. 

Franklin’s Gull: Usually a few can be found lingering in summer, but this year last 
reported for spring were 31 at LM 9 Jun (SJD) and first in fall 10 at BOL 
13 Jul (LE). Best count was only 58, in Nuckolls Co 2 Jun (LR,RH). 

Ring-billed Gull: LM still had 133 on 9 Jun (SJD), a good count for the date. 

California Gull: Best count was 17 at LM on 9 Jun, consisting of 15 adults and 
one each first and second summer birds (SJD). A first summer bird was at 
Oliver Res 16 Jun (WRS). Numbers are lowest in Jun. 

Herring Gull: Routine reports. 

Least Tern: LM hosted 8 adults with 4 nests 9 Jun (SJD); one adult was there 3 
Jun (JGJ). Nesting was successful at a popular swimming area in sw. Sarpy 




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Co, where 10-12 adults had at least 2 young ready to fledge 18 Jul (CNK). 
One near Friend 9 Jun (LR,RH) was unexpected at that location, and is 
only the 5th RWB record in some 90 years. Several other reports were from 
or near traditional summering locations on the Platte River west to Dodge 
Co (L&BP,D&JP,CNK). 

Caspian Tern: The only report was of 2 at LM 3 Jun (JGJ), a location where there 
have been several early Jun reports in recent years. 

Black Tern: An “immature”, presumably a year-old bird not completing migration, 
was at Wehrspann L, Sarpy Co, 19 Jun (JWH), and another straggler was in 
Lancaster Co 28 Jun (LE). First juveniles noted were with adults at Funk 
Lagoon 3 Jul (KS), rather early. 

Common Tern: The only report was of an altemate-plumaged adult at LM 10 Jun 
(SJD); migrants pass through into mid-Jun. 

Forster’s Tern: Two molting adults at Oliver Res 16 Jun were likely failed breeders 
or non-breeders (WRS), while 6 at BOL 13 Jul (LE) were fall migrants. 

Rock Pigeon: Routine reports. 

Eurasian Collared-Dove: Routine reports (finally). 

White-winged Dove: The 2nd breeding record for this increasingly-reported species 
in Nebraska was of a pair with a juvenile in Lincoln 11 Jul (DL). There 
were 3 additional reports: singles in Albion 4 Jun (D&CN), where the first 
breeding record occurred in 2005, in Fairmont 15 Jul (JR), and in David 
City 17 Jul (RE). 

Mourning Dove: Flocks of young birds begin to form in mid-Jul; 118 were at one 
site in Lancaster Co 21 Jul (LE). 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo: Routine reports. 

Black-billed Cuckoo: This species is being reported more often, including a record 
count of 7 in Otoe Co 16 Jun (L&CF), suggesting that migration in this 
species continues well into Jun. It summered at ADF (L&CF), and singles 
were at SCP 6 Jun (KP), Adams Co 7 Jul (MB), and se. Jefferson Co 14 
Jul (WRS). 

Barn Owl: An adult at a nest with 2 young as well as an additional nest were found 
at LM 9 Jun (SJD), a regular nesting location. The only other report was of 
one in Adams Co 15 Jun (PD). 

Eastern Screech-Owl: Routine reports. 

Great Horned Owl; Routine reports. 

Burrowing Owl: Surveys in Scotts Bluff Co showed a decline from 97 birds in 
2006 to 58 this year, although the ratio of juveniles to adults was similar at 
56% and 49% respectively (KD). 

Barred Owl: Continuing westerly reports in the Platte Valley was a dead bird found 
at North Platte and turned in for West Nile Virus testing 7 Jun (fide TJW). 

Long-eared Owl: None were reported; this species is a regular but rare breeder in 
Nebraska. 

Short-eared Owl: The only report was of 2 at a traditional summer location in 
Scotts Bluff Co 14 Jul (KD). 

Common Nighthawk: Routine reports. 

Common Poorwill: A local rancher reported “dozens” on the dirt canyon roads in 
Lincoln Co 15 Jun ((fide TJW); although this is one of fewer than 5 reports 
from that area, this interesting habitat apparently hosts good numbers of 
this species. 




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Chuck-will’s-widow: Singles were detected again this year at Oak Glen WMA, 
Seward Co, 16 and 18 Jul (JG,CNK). There are few known regular 
locations in the state. 

Whip-poor-will: A good count of 10+ was made at Oak Glen WMA, Seward Co, 
16 Jul (JG); this species is localized in the east due to its dislike of 
disturbed woodland such as that affected by grazing, but is abundant in 
suitable woodlands. 

Chimney Swift: Routine reports. 

White-throated Swift: The only reports were from traditional locations in Scotts 
Bluff Co (AK). 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: There were scattered summer reports from the 
Missouri Valley (L&CF,TP,CNK,RM), as expected. 

Broad-tailed Hummingbird: An exciting report was from the observer’s feeders in 
s. Scotts Bluff Co, where a male was seen 24 Jun and a female remained 
there 27 Jun-23 Jul (AK). The only other summer record suggestive of 
breeding, not yet documented in Nebraska, was one identified by the loud 
buzz in flight 29 Jun 2003 in Monroe Canyon. First for fall was record 
early by a few days near Mitchell 12 Jul, and 1-2 were there through 21 Jul 
(KD). 

Calliope Hummingbird: The 3 singles reported were a male at WSR 7 Jul (HKH), 
a bird in Scotts Bluff Co 13 Jul (AK), and one near Mitchell 22 Jul (KD). 
With knowledgeable feeder-watchers monitoring hummers in the Panhandle, 
this species is proving to be a regular migrant, along with Rufous and 
Broad-tailed. 

Rufous Hummingbird: Earliest of 3 or so reported in Scotts Bluff Co was near 
Mitchell 12 Jul (KD), tying the 3rd-earliest date. 

Belted Kingfisher: Routine reports. 

Red-headed Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Downy Woodpecker: Adults were feeding nestlings near Broken Bow 9 Jun (TH). 

Hairy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Northern Flicker: A nest with a nearly-fledged young bird was near Broken Bow 9 
Jun (TH). 

Pileated Woodpecker: Nesting was confirmed at both locations where breeding is 
known to occur. At 1CSP, a nest hole found 9 Jun (SM) had 3 juveniles 
near fledging 16 Jun (RM). At FF, a nest near Hidden Lake checked on 1 
and 13 Jul still had at least one of the 3 young seen there earlier (CNK). 
This is the second of the 2 active nests at FF this year. Intriguing were 
unconfirmed sightings from Lincoln and McPherson Cos in late summer 
2005 (fide TJW). There are no confirmed reports away from se. Nebraska. 

Olive-sided Flycatcher: The only sighting was the last spring migrant reported, in 
Lancaster Co 1 Jun (LE). 

Western Wood-Pewee: Routine reports. 

Eastern Wood-Pewee: Adults were feeding young in Burt Co 10 Jul (CNK) and 
Sarpy Co 26 Jul (CNK). 

Acadian Flycatcher: None were reported; this is a summer resident in the southeast. 

Alder Flycatcher: There were 3 reports of this late-migrating species: 2 were 
captured and measured at Boyer Chute NWR, Washington Co, 1 Jun 
(RS,BG), one was heard in Keith Co 3 Jun (JM), and another singing there 
10 Jun (SJD) was latest on record. 




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Willow Flycatcher: Routine reports. 

Least Flycatcher: This early fall migrant was reported 26 Jul in Dodge Co (D&JP); 
the few documented records suggest migration begins in late Jul in 
Nebraska. 

Cordilleran Flycatcher: The only reports were from traditional summer locations in 
Sioux Co 30 Jun (AK). 

Eastern Phoebe: Routine reports. 

Say’s Phoebe: An adult was feeding 3 fledglings at Lorenzo, Cheyenne Co, 4 Jul 
(KD). 

Ash-throated Flycatcher: Very exciting was the discovery of a single in Kimball 
Co 28 Jun (WM), photographed 9-10 Jul (JG,MB), and subsequent 
confirmation of the presence of a breeding pair there 15 Jul (WM). This is 
the first Nebraska breeding record, and only the 2nd record overall. 

Great Crested Flycatcher: An adult was feeding young rather late at ADF 28 Jul 
(L&CF), and one was westerly, but within the summer range, in West Ash 
Canyon, Dawes Co, 7 Jul (LH,RH). 

Cassin’s Kingbird: This species has increased its range in s. Panhandle 
escarpments in Kimball, Banner, Scotts Bluff, and Morrill Cos in the last 
20 years (AK). It also occurs in good numbers in favored locations away 
from escarpments, such as just south of Exit 1 on 1-80 in Kimball Co, 
where 4 were found 3 Jun (JGJ). 

Western Kingbird: Young were being fed in Banner Co 2 Jun (AK), rather early; 
earliest egg date for this species, however, is 4 May. An excellent easterly 
count was the 20 in Lancaster Co 13 Jul (LE), when fall groups begin to 
appear. 

Eastern Kingbird: The 145 in Lancaster Co 28 Jul (LE) was an excellent count; as 
with Western Kingbird, groups form in late Jul. 

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher: Breeding occurred at the Lincoln Airport where a pair had 
a nest with eggs 16 Jun and 4 fledged young 6 Jul (AR, fide JGJ). 
Apparently 3 young were fledged there in 2006 also (fide AR). Although a 
juvenile was reported at Eppley Airfield, Omaha, as early as 2 Jun, only 
singles were reported there, leaving breeding unconfirmed (m. ob.). The 
male of the breeding pair in sw. Kearney Co was seen 12 Jun (TH). Yet 
another single was in Nemaha Co 22-23 Jun (CG, fide JGJ). 

Loggerhead Shrike: The w. Sandhills and Panhandle continue to be a national 
stronghold for this species; good numbers were found in Cherry and 
Sheridan Cos in early Jun, with 14 counted on 2 BBS routes (CNK), and 
in Cheyenne Co 4 Jul, where 4 family groups were found on a BBS route 
(KD). One on a nest near Agate 9 Jun (AK) was behind schedule. 

Bell’s Vireo: Routine reports. 

Yellow-throated Vireo: Routine reports. 

Plumbeous Vireo: Towards the e. end of the Nebraska breeding range were 2 at 
West Ash Canyon, Dawes Co, 7 Jul (LR,RH) and 2 at Chadron SP, Dawes 
Co, 8 Jul (LR,RH). 

Warbling Vireo: Routine reports. 

Red-eyed Vireo: A nest with young was at Bassett 14 Jul (CH). 

Blue Jay: An incubating bird was at SCP 6 Jun (KP), on schedule. 

Pinyon Jay: None were reported; this is a rare breeder in the northwest. 

Black-billed Magpie: One of the more easterly nestings for some time was in e. 
Seward Co this summer (SR). Also easterly were 2-3 in Adams Co 7-14 



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Jul (MB,PD). Numbers may be recovering in the west; 6 in the observer’s 
yard in Scotts Bluff Co were the first there in 6 years (AK). 

American Crow: Routine reports. 

Horned Lark: Fledglings were found in Banner Co 2 Jun (AK). 

Purple Martin: Two were near the w. edge of the summer range in Ogallala 9 Jun 
(SJD). A pair with 3 fledglings was in Bellevue 26 Jul (CNK), rather close 
to fall departure dates, as exemplified by the flock of 200 at a North Platte 
ball park 28-29 Jul (TJW) and an amazing tally of 1200-1500 migrating in 
loose flocks over Omaha 30 Jul (JR). 

Tree Swallow: Adults were feeding fledglings at Funk Lagoon 3 Jul (KS). 

Violet-green Swallow: Routine reports. 

Northern Rough-winged Swallow: Routine reports. 

Bank Swallow: Newly-fledged young were seen in Otoe Co 21 Jul (CNK), close to 
fall departure. 

Cliff Swallow: Adults were feeding young near Agate 9 Jun (AK), rather early. 

Barn Swallow: Routine reports. 

Black-capped Chickadee: Routine reports. 

Tufted Titmouse: Adults were feeding 2 young at ADF 2 Jul (L&CF). 

Red-breasted Nuthatch: One in West Ash Canyon, Dawes Co, 7 Jul (LR,RH) 
may have been an early fall wanderer; breeding records in the Pine Ridge are 
surprisingly scarce. 

White-breasted Nuthatch: One in Monroe Canyon feeding young 30 Jun (AK) was 
presumably of the western subspecies nelsoni. 

Pygmy Nuthatch: Routine reports. 

Brown Creeper: None were reported; this species is a rare breeder in the Missouri 
Valley and uncommon in the Pine Ridge. 

Rock Wren: Easterly was one on a rocked railroad embankment in Adams Co 16 
Jun (PD); summer reports east of the breeding range are rare. Fewer than 
usual were found in the loess canyons of se. Lincoln Co, possibly because 
heavy rains washed away dirt bank breeding sites (TJW). Adults were 
carrying food in Banner and Scotts Bluff Cos 2 Jun (AK). 

Carolina Wren: An experienced observer noted that this species “has never been so 
widely distributed” (LE). 

House Wren: A good count was the 38 at Wilderness Park, Lincoln, 5 Jun (LE). 
Nest-building was noted near Broken Bow 4 Jul (TH), apparently a 2nd 
brood, and fledglings were seen at ADF 12 Jul (L&CF). 

Sedge Wren: Most pass through Nebraska in spring, with few remaining in Jun. 
However one was singing in a grassy Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) 
field near Pickrell 3 Jun, possibly a late migrant (WRS), one was in 
Lancaster Co 25 Jun (LE), and one was in Knox Co 28 Jun (D&JP). 
Typically, Sedge Wrens return to Nebraska in good numbers in mid-Jul; 
one was at ADF 6 Jul, and another was carrying nest material there 22 Jul 
(L&CF). 

Marsh Wren: While the propensity of Sedge Wren to arrive in mid-Jul and at least 
attempt nesting is well-known, the same phenomenon likely occurs with 
Marsh Wren also, at least in the RWB; these birds are absent there in early 
summer but singing birds start showing up in mid- or late summer (JGJ). 
There are few actual breeding records south of the Platte Valley, but 
summer records there are almost all from mid-Jul on. This summer, with 
good water conditions, territorial birds appeared in w. Seward Co marshes 



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19 Jul where none were found May-Jun (JG). One carrying food near North 
Platte 9 Jul (TJW) and another that appeared at the marsh in FF 9 Jul 
(L&BP) were likely new arrivals also. 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher: One was carrying nest material in Banner Co 2 Jun (AK). 

Eastern Bluebird: A series of boxes in Otoe Co fledged 45 young this year 
(L&CF). An adult was tending a juvenile at SCP 6 Jun (KP), 

Mountain Bluebird: Adults were carrying food in Scotts Bluff and Banner Cos 2 
Jun (AK), and fledglings were seen in Sioux Co 30 Jun (AK). Several were 
using nest boxes near Chadron 7 Jun (L&CF). 

Wood Thrush: At the w. edge of the breeding range was one at Hormel Park, 
Fremont, 27 Jun (RE). 

American Robin: Routine reports. 

Gray Catbird: Routine reports. 

Northern Mockingbird: Good numbers can be found in se. Nebraska; 6 were in 
Gage Co 21 Jun (L&BP) and 5 singing birds were on an 80-acre site in 
Pawnee Co 30 Jun (WRS). 

Brown Thrasher: A nest with 3 young was at SCP 6 Jun (KP) and a recent 
fledgling at Bellevue 26 Jul (CNK) was rather late. 

European Starling: Routine reports. 

Cedar Waxwing: Typical of this species, a rather late flock was seen at Boyer 
Chute NWR, Washington Co, 1 Jun (RS,BG). Nestlings had fledged from 
a nest in Scotts Bluff Co 11 Jul (AK). 

Northern Parula: One at Fairbury 3 Jun (LR,RH) was westerly; there are few 
breeding season records west of the Missouri Valley. 

Yellow Warbler: Routine reports. 

Yellow-rumped (Audubon’s) Warbler: One was carrying food in Monroe Canyon, 
30 Jun (AK). 

Black-throated Green Warbler: One at Chadron 7 Jun (L&CF) was 3rd latest for 
spring and only the 2nd Panhandle record for spring. 

Yellow-throated Warbler: None were reported; several were reported in spring, but 
this species becomes inconspicuous in summer. 

Cerulean Warbler: None were reported, following a few spring reports. 

Black-and-white Warbler: The only reports were from regular summer locations in 
Monroe and Sowbelly Canyons 30 Jun (AK). 

American Redstart: Reports were from regular summering locations on the Pine 
Ridge and in the east; adults were feeding young in Sioux Co 30 Jun (AK). 

Prothonotary Warbler: None were reported, following a few spring reports. 

Worm-eating Warbler: One singing at WSR 8 Jun (HKH) was the 4th Panhandle 
record for this species, which is a good find anywhere in Nebraska. 

Ovenbird: Routine reports. 

Louisiana Waterthrush: The only reports from the summer were from traditional 
areas: one at ADF 17 Jun (L&CF) and 2 at Platte River SP, Cass Co, 6 Jul 
(L&BP). 

Kentucky Warbler: The only report was of a singing male westerly and late at 
Hastings 2 Jun (PD). None were reported from breeding locations. 

Common Yellowthroat: Routine reports. 

Yellow-breasted Chat: Two birds west of Alma 7 Jul were at “the only reliable spot 
in the county” (G&WH); chats are now rare in eastern and much of central 
Nebraska. 



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Summer Tanager: As in the last few summers, this species is now being reported 
from most mature forests in the extreme southeast. One was just north of 
Omaha in Douglas Co 1 Jul (L&BP), one was at Platte River SP, Cass Co, 
27 Jun (RE), and 2 were at ICSP 13 Jul (L&BP). A surprise was a westerly 
bird at Rock Glen WMA, Jefferson Co, 30 Jun (WRS). 

Scarlet Tanager: One at Hormel Park, Fremont, 14 Jun (D&JP) was near the west 
edge of the summer range. 

Western Tanager: One was carrying food in Sioux Co 30 Jun (AK). 

Eastern Towhee: Towhees heard at Rock Glen WMA, Jefferson Co, this summer 
all sang hybrid songs (WRS). 

Spotted Towhee: Spotteds were reported in Harlan Co in early Jul (G&WH), where 
hybrids and Easterns have also been found previously. 

Cassin’s Sparrow: None were reported; this is a regular, local summer resident in 
the southwest. 

Chipping Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Brewer’s Sparrow: None were reported; this species breeds in western sand-sage 
prairie. 

Field Sparrow: Rare in the Panhandle, one in West Ash Canyon, Dawes Co, 7 Jul 
(LR,RH) was only the 3rd Panhandle record in summer. 

Vesper Sparrow: A nest with 4 young near Cedar Bluffs in a field planted to 
soybeans with standing com stubble was empty 16 Jul, although the adults 
were nearby (JMu). Joel Jorgensen pointed out that Vesper Sparrows in 
eastern Nebraska have adapted to this type of habitat and appear to be 
increasing in numbers and range in recent years. Don Paseka noted also that 
the recent trend to no-till methods of row-crop farming has allowed this 
type of habitat to survive through planting, in contrast with the full-tillage 
methods used formerly that destroyed the previous year’s stubble and any 
nests present. The only birds or nests destroyed by no-till methods would 
be the unlucky few hit by tractor or planter wheels. Lany Einemann, who 
has covered Lancaster Co regularly for many years, has also noticed the 
increase in Vesper Sparrow numbers, and their preference for early stage 
untilled soybean fields. 

Lark Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Lark Bunting: This western species, along with Vesper Sparrows in eastern 
Nebraska, may be adapting to no-till agricultural practices; 30-40 were 
using a growing com field planted into the previous year’s wheat stubble in 
Lincoln Co 28 Jun while few or none were using nearby grasslands (TJW). 
Numbers were low this summer due to very dry conditions, especially in 
Kimball (WRS), Keith, Hitchcock, and Hayes Cos (TJW). The BBS route 
in Kimball Co had its lowest total, only 50, since the observer (WRS) 
began running the route in 1995. Rare eastward, one in Dixon Co 2 Jun 
was only the observer’s 2nd there in 7-8 years (JJ). 

Savannah Sparrow: There are a few locations in the Panhandle and perhaps 
elsewhere where this species breeds. Although not documented there, one at 
Facus Springs, Morrill Co, 10 Jun (SJD) was in suitable breeding habitat. 

Grasshopper Sparrow: This species was using growing com in wheat stubble in 
Keith Co 28 Jun, as with Lark Buntings (see above), but it was also present 
in nearby grasslands (TJW). Although this is encouraging, Grasshopper 
Sparrow is not very picky in its choice of “grasslands”, as indicated by a 



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wide range of types, including grazed pastures, used in se. Nebraska this 
summer (WRS). 

Henslow’s Sparrow: There were several reports this summer; although habitat 
suitable for this species is limited in Nebraska, birds can be found in areas 
which meet their requirements, sometimes in large numbers. In a 160-acre 
CRP/hayfield near Burchard, 39 singing birds were counted 24 Jun, 9 were 
there on 14 Jul after part of the area was mowed, and 4 were still there 19 
Aug after about half was mowed, suggesting that the early numbers were 
mostly migrants or that the initial mowing activity caused many to leave 
(WRS). At a nearly pristine 160-acre prairie nearby, 31 Henslow’s were 
counted 19 Aug (WRS). The westernmost known breeding site in the state 
is at the Platte River Whooping Crane Trust property in Buffalo Co, where 
Henslow’s have been found every year since 1995 and nests have been 
found in 3 of the last 4 years (DK). Also westerly were 2 in CRP near 
Tobias 2 Jun; they could not be relocated later (WRS). Other reports were 
of 5 at Allwine Prairie, Douglas Co, 4 Jun (JMc), 6-8 singing “relentlessly” 
at Harvard Marsh 22-23 Jun (PD), and one singing at Fort Atkinson SHP, 
Washington Co, 24 Jun (RM). 

Song Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Swamp Sparrow; Reports were from known breeding locations in the central part of 
the state, including 11 at LM 9 Jun (SJD) and one carrying food near North 
Platte 9 Jul (TJW). 

Dark-eyed (White-winged) Junco: Reports were from the Pine Ridge breeding 
range, including a fledgling in Monroe Canyon, Sioux Co, 30 Jun (AK). 

McCown’s Longspun Routine reports. 

Chestnut-collared Longspur: Numbers on a BBS route in Kimball Co 16 Jun 
were the lowest in several years due to very dry pasture conditions (WRS). 

Northern Cardinal: Routine reports. 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak: One at LM 9 Jun (SJD) was westerly and rather late; 
spring migrants occur westward with some regularity, but there are few 
reports after May. 

Black-headed Grosbeak: A male was feeding a fledgling in West Ash Canyon, 
Dawes Co, 7 Jul (LR,RH). 

Blue Grosbeak: A female was incubating 2 eggs in Seward Co 9 Jun (JG). 
Numbers are lowest in the southeast; singles were in Otoe Co 16 Jun 
(L&CF) and Richardson Co 13 Jul (L&BP). 

Lazuli Bunting: One in Keith Co 2 Jun (JM) was somewhat east of the current 
breeding range and at that date was likely a migrant. 

Indigo Bunting: The 8 males in Otoe Co 21 Jul (CNK) would have brightened up 
the place. 

Dickcissel: After last year’s major push westward, a minor echo was detected this 
year. Dickcissels were “doing quite well” in Keith Co with 9 males per stop 
for stops located in CRP habitat on a BBS route 28 Jun (TJW), and a nest 
with eggs was at the west end of LM 9 Jun (SJD). Numbers were high in 
n.-cen. Nebraska, where 200+ were counted around Calamus Res and 200+ 
in sw. Rock Co 18 Jun (RE), and in Lancaster Co where 78 were tallied 13 
Jul (LE). 

Bobolink: Most common north of the Platte River, there were several reports from 
the southeast where few or none are usually found. The species was 
conspicuous in undisturbed native grasslands in the extreme southeast 



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(WRS), 12 singing males were at Harvard Marsh 2 Jim (PD), a male was in 
w. Seward Co (JG), and 2 were singing in ne. Saline Co (LR,RH). A 
county first for the observer was a pair in irrigated grass in Scotts Bluff Co 
14 Jul (KD), and an unusual sight was one in wheatgrass in a sw. Lincoln 
Co canyon (TJW). 

Red-winged Blackbird: Routine reports. 

Eastern Meadowlark: This species was abundant in the Calamus Res- sw. Rock 
Co area 18-19 Jun, with about 400 tallied in all (RE). A nest with 5 eggs 
was found in Jefferson Co 9 Jun and agitated, calling adults were in 
attendance (WRS). 

Western Meadowlark: Routine reports. 

Yellow-headed Blackbird: Nestlings 1-5 days old were at NLB 10 Jun (JGJ). 

Brewer’s Blackbird: Breeding is essentially limited to the northern two-thirds of 
the Panhandle, and so 7 at Valentine NWR, Cherry Co, 10 Jun (L&CF) 
were apparently wandering non-breeders; this has been known to occur 
previously in Kansas. 

Common Grackle: Routine reports. 

Great-tailed Grackle: A nest with 4 eggs was found in w. Seward Co 10 Jun (JGJ) 
and a fledgling was being fed at Funk Lagoon 3 Jut (KS). 

Brown-headed Cowbird: Routine reports. 

Orchard Oriole: The 50 in Keith Co 10 Jun (SJD) was an excellent count. 

Baltimore Oriole: An interesting observation by a long-time Bellevue bander was 
that all of the 37 banded 24 Jul were hatch-year birds and had virtually 
complete breast feathering about 10 days earlier than usual (RG). This 
raises the possibility that adults departed on a molt migration as a result of 
hot, dry summer weather in the area. Although Bullock’s Oriole has a 
well-documented molt migration, it would seem to be necessary much less 
often for Baltimores. Alternatively, of course, conditions earlier in spring 
may have been conducive to a major advancement of the entire breeding 
schedule. 

Bullock’s Oriole: Of 5 birds at Box Butte Res, Dawes Co, 5 Jul, 4 appeared 
phenotypically pure and one was a hybrid (LR,RH), while, somewhat 
easterly, one of two birds at LO was phenotypically pure, the other looked 
so, but was “probably a hybrid” (SJD). A male was feeding a juvenile in 
Dawes Co 7 Jul (LR.RH). Pure-appearing Bullock’s are rare east of the 
Panhandle. 

Cassia’s Finch: A pair on 28 Jun, not well seen, south of 1-80 Exit 1 in Limber 
Pines was reminiscent of this species but not conclusively identified (WM). 
Breeding has occurred in the northern Panhandle. 

House Finch: Routine reports. 

Red Crossbill: A few were found on the Pine Ridge during the period, including a 
female and 4 immatures near Chadron 7 Jun (L&CF), and “several” in 
Monroe Canyon 30 Jun (AK) and 6 Jul (LR,RH). An immature hit a 
window in the observer’s yard in s. Scotts Bluff Co 15 Jul (AK). 

Pine Siskin: None were reported; breeding is regular in the west. 

American Goldfinch: Routine reports. 

House Sparrow: Routine reports. 



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Vol-75 No. 3 


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2006 (18th) REPORT OF THE NOU RECORDS COMMITTEE 

Compiled by Mark A. Brogie (NOURC Chairperson) 

508 Seeley, Box 316 
Creighton, NE 68729 
mbrogie@esul.org 


The functions and methods of the Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union (NOU) 
Records Committee are described in its bylaws (NOU Records Committee 1986). 
The committee’s purpose is to provide a procedure for documenting unusual bird 
sightings and to establish a list of all documented birds for Nebraska. The “Official 
List of the Birds of Nebraska” was first published in 1988 (NOU Records 
Committee 1988) and has been updated two times (NOU Records Committee 1997, 
2004). 

The “Official List” has been appended sixteen times: (Mollhoff 1989; Grenon 
1990, 1991; Gubanyi 1996a, 1996b, 1996c; Brogie 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 
2005, 2006; Jorgensen 2001, 2002, 2003). This report includes all accounts 
submitted during the calendar year of 2006, covering 45 records with accession 
numbers 1131-1175. 

All records mentioned here are available to interested persons at the NOU 
archives at the University of Nebraska State Museum (UNSM), Lincoln, NE. 
Interested parties should contact the current NOU Librarian, whose address can be 
found in the latest issue of The Nebraska Bird Review (NBR). 


State List 

The American Ornithologists' Union Checklist of North American Birds, Seventh 
Edition (1998) and the Forty-first, Forty-second, Forty-third, Forty-fourth, Forty- 
fifth, Forty-sixth, and Forty-seventh Supplement to the American Ornithologists' 
Union (AOU, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006) contain many taxonomic 
changes affecting North American birds. The following summarizes all 2006 
revisions by the AOU in regards to changes in scientific names and changes in 
assignments to family and order of species to the most recently published “Official 
List of the Birds of Nebraska” (NBR 72: 108-126). 

Additionally, the list reflects changes in frequency of occurrence as determined 
by the NOU Records Committee, which reviewed records of bird occurrences in 
Nebraska for 1997-2006. Frequency of occurrence is indicated by the following terms 
(NOU Records Committee 1988, 1997, 2004): 

Regular - acceptably reported in 9-10 of the past 10 years. 

Casual - acceptably reported in 4-7 of the past 10 years. 

Accidental - acceptably reported in 0-2 of the past 10 years. 

Extirpated - not acceptably reported in the past 50 years. 

Extinct - no longer found alive anywhere in the world. 

The frequency of occurrence for any species that is acceptably reported in 3 or 8 
of the last 10 years is discussed by the committee and placed in a category felt most 
appropriate by the committee. 

With this report, the following changes are made to the "Official List of the 
Birds of Nebraska”. 




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52 


Changes in Frequency of Occurrence 

1. American Black Duck ( Anas rubripes ) Regular to Casual. 

2. Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus ) Casual to 

Accidental. 

3. Mew Gull ( Larus canus ) Regular to Casual. 

4. Blue-winged Warbler ( Vermivora pinus) Regular to Casual. 

5. Connecticut Warbler ( Oporornis agilis ) Regular to Casual. 

6. Cassin’s Finch ( Carpodacus cassinii ) Regular to Casual. 

7. Evening Grosbeak (Coccothraustes vespertinus) Regular to 

Casual. 


Changes Involving Nebraska Species Due to Taxonomic Revisions 
and/or Changes in English or Scientific Names 

1. Willet ( Catoptrophorus semipalmatus ) becomes ( Tringa 

semipalmata). 

2. Least Tern (Sterna antillarum ) becomes (Sternula 

antillarum). 

3. Caspian Tern ( Sterna caspia) becomes (Hydroprogne caspia ). 


Changes in Sequence 

A change is made in the taxonomic order of the family Scolopacidae in the 
“Official List of the Birds of Nebraska”. The new sequence is as follows: 

Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) 

Solitary Sandpiper ( Tringa solitaria ) 

Greater Yellowlegs ( Tringa melanoleuca ) 

Willet ( Tringa semipalmata ) 

Lesser Yellowlegs ( Tringa flavipes) 

The jaegers are now placed in their own family (Stercorariidae) and will be placed 
after the family Laridae in the “Official List of the Birds of Nebraska”. 

A change is made in the taxonomic order of terns in the family Laridae in the 
“Official List of the Birds of Nebraska”. The new sequence is as follows: 

Least Tern (Sternula antillarum ) 

Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia ) 

Black Tern (Chlidonias niger ) 

Common Tern (Sterna hirundo ) 

Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea ) 

Forster’s Tern (Sterna forsteri ) 




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A change is made in the taxonomic order of the family Cuculidae in the "Official 
List of the Birds of Nebraska”. The new sequence is as follows: 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo ( Coccyzus americanus ) 

Black-billed Cuckoo ( Coccyzus erythropthalmus) 

Groove-billed Ani ( Crotophaga sulcirostris ) 


Criteria for Accepted Records 

In order for a record to be accepted, a minimum of six votes in favor are required 
with no more than one dissenting vote (NOU Records Committee 1986). Records 
in the following classes are listed as accepted: 

I-S - a diagnostic, labeled specimen exists. 

I-P - a diagnostic, labeled photograph or slide exists. 

I-R - a diagnostic, labeled recording exists. 

II - three or more independently written diagnostic documentations of the 

same bird exist. 

III - one or two independently written diagnostic documentations of the same 

bird exist. 

Each account of an accepted record includes a brief statement noting the species, 
class, date, location, and initials) of observers. 


Changes in Firmness of Data 

1. Wood Stork (Mycteria americana ) Change from Class III to Class 1-P. 

2006 Additions to State List 

There were no new additions in 2006; the “Official List of the 
Birds of Nebraska” stands at 448 species. 


2006 Accepted Records 

Eurasian Wigeon ( Anas penelope ) 

1. An adult male was photographed (Class 1-P, KD) at Chilibaba Pond, 
Scotts Bluff Co., 18 March 2006. Accession # 1135. 

Harlequin Duck {Histrionicus histrionicus ) 

1. A single male was photographed (Class 1-P, MAB) above Gavins 

Pt. Dam, Knox Co., 03 March 2006. Accession # 1133. 

2. The above bird was photographed (Class 1-P, PR) above Gavins 

Pt. Dam, Cedar Co., 04 March 2006. Accession #1134. 

3. The above bird was described (Class III, BH) from Gavins Pt. 

Dam, Cedar Co., 04 March 2006. Accession #1154. 



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m 


Glossy Ibis {Plegadis falcinellus) 

1. As many as six birds were photographed (Class 1-P; PD) at 

Harvard WPA, Clay Co., 06 May 2006. Accession # 1136. 

2. An adult bird was photographed (Class 1-P; JJ) at Weis WPA, Fillmore 

Co., 05 October 2006. Accession # 1147. 

3. A single adult was observed (Class III, SJD) at Lake McConaughy, Keith 

Co., 15 May 2006. Accession # 1171. 

Wood Stork {Mycteria americana ) 

1. A probable second-year bird was found (JC, SS) east of Ashland, in Cass 
Co., 02 August 2007 and was photographed (Class 1-P, JJ) on the 
following day. Accession # 1143. This is the second documented record 
for this species in Nebraska. 

Sandhill Crane {Grus canadensis) 

1. A pair of birds with two chicks was found (EM) and photographed 
(Class 1-P, BG) at Facus Springs WMA, Morrill Co., 18 July 2006. 
Accession #1142. 

Whooping Crane ( Grus americana) 

1. A group of four adults and one juvenile bird was photographed (Class 1-P, 
MAB) south of Creighton in Antelope Co., 12-13 April 2006. 

Accession # 1173. 

Western Sandpiper ( Calidris mauri) 

1. An adult bird in basic plumage and an adult bird in alternate plumage were 
observed (Class III, TH) at North Marsh Lake, Valentine NWR, Cherry 
Co., 23 May 2006. Accession # 1138. 

Red Phalarope ( Phalaropus fulicarius) 

1. A single molting adult was photographed (Class 1-P, SJD) at Lake 
McConaughy, Keith Co., 26 August 2006. Accession # 1163. 

2, A single juvenile was photographed (Class 1-P, SJD) at Lake 
McConaughy, Keith Co., 15 September 2006. Accession #1164. 

Laughing Gull {Larus atricilla) 

1. A first-year bird was photographed (Class 1-P; JJ) at Oak Lake in 
Lincoln, Lancaster Co., 22 October 2006. Accession # 1148. 

2. A second-winter bird was observed (Class III; MAB) at Willow Creek 
SRA, Pierce Co., 27 October 2006. Accession # 1151. 

Little Gull ( Larus minutus) 

1. A single juvenile was photographed (Class 1-P, SJD) below Keystone 
Dam, Keith Co., 27 August 2006. Accession # 1166. 

Great Black-backed Gull {Larus marinus) 

1. An adult bird was photographed (Class 1-P; MI) on Lake McConaughy, 
Keith Co., 01 October 2006. Accession #1153. 

2. An adult bird (most likely the above bird) was photographed (Class 1-P; 
SJD) on Lake McConaughy, Keith Co., 31 October 2006. Accession 
#1172. 

The NOURC no longer seeks documentation for this species. 



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Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla ) 

1. A first-winter-plumaged bird was photographed (Class 1-P; PD) on a 
small sandpit in Hall Co., 06 December 2005. Accession # 1152. 

Arctic Tern ( Sterna paradisaea) 

1. A single first summer bird was observed and described (Class II, MAB) 
at Lake Babcock/Lake North, Platte Co., 26 & 30 September 2006. 
Accession # 1146. 

2. The above bird, initially found and described (Class II, CW) at Lake 
Babcock/Lake North, Platte Co., 26 September 2006. Accession # 1161. 

3. The above bird was described (Class II, BH) at Lake Babcock/Lake 
North, Platte Co., 30 September 2006. Accession # 1174. 

Class II - three or more independently written diagnostic documentations of 
the same bird exist. 

Pomarine Jaeger ( Stercorarius pomarinus ) 

1. A light morph juvenile was photographed (Class 1-P; SJD) on Lake 
McConaughy, Keith Co., 17 September 2006. Accession # 1165. 

Inca Dove ( Columbina inca ) 

1. A single bird that over-wintered was photographed (Class 1-P; TB, JB) 
in Bellevue, Sarpy Co., 26 February 2006. Accession # 1132. 

2. The above bird was described (Class III; BH) from Bellevue, Sarpy Co., 

18 March 2006. Accession #1155. 

3. A single bird was photographed (Class 1-P, SJD) at Keystone, Keith Co., 
31 December2006. Accession# 1175. 

The NOURC no longer seeks documentation for this species. 

Barred Owl (Slrix varia) 

1. A single bird was photographed (Class 1-P; via TJW) near North Platte, 
Lincoln Co., Fall 2006. Accession # 1158. 

Common Raven {Corvus corax ) 

1. A single bird was heard and observed (Class III; SJD) west of Dad’s 
Lake, Valentine NWR, Cherry Co., 28 October 2006. Accession # 1168. 

Varied Thrush {Ixoreus naevius) 

1. An adult male was photographed (Class 1-P, HH) at Wind Springs 
Ranch, Sioux Co., 24-28 October 2006. Accession # 1157. 

Curve-billed Thrasher ( Toxostoma curvirostre ) 

1. A single bird was photographed (Class 1-P, TH) at Hackberry Lake, 
Valentine NWR, Cherry Co., 08-09 July 2006. Accession # 1141. 

Bohemian Waxwing ( Bombycilla garrulus ) 

1. A single bird was photographed (Class 1 -P, JJ) at Branched Oak Lake, 
Lancaster Co., 22 November 2006. Accession # 1159. 

Pine Warbler ( Dendroica pinus) 

1. An adult male was observed (Class III; TJW) in a mixed grove of pine 
and cedar trees at the North Platte Fish Hatchery, Lincoln Co., 10 October 
2006. Accession #1150. 




Vol. 75 No. 3 


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91 


McCown’s Longspur {Calcarius mccownii ) 

1. A single juvenile was photographed (Class 1-P, SJD) at Lake 
McConaughy, Keith Co., 17 September 2006. Accession # 1167. 


Unaccepted Records 

Records in the following classes are considered unaccepted (NOU 
Records Committee 1986): 

IV - probably correct, but not beyond reasonable doubt. 

V - a record with insufficient evidence to support the identification 

claimed. 

VI - a probable released or escaped bird or mistaken identification. 

Each account of an unaccepted record includes a brief statement noting the 
species, class, date, location, and reasons for the committee’s failure to accept the 
record 


2006 Unaccepted Records 

Pink-footed Goose ( Anser brachyrhynchus ) 

1. An adult bird was photographed at Harvard Marsh, Clay Co., 30 
January 2006. Dispute was not with the identification, but with the 
provenance of the bird. This species has occurred recently in PA, CT, 

MA, and NF, and historically in DE and PQ, usually in the company of 
Snow Goose. Pink-footed Goose is considered relatively rare in captivity, 
but observers should be attentive to clues that may indicate a captive 
origin: bands, feather wear, and behavior. Species associations may 
provide a clue to origin, although neck-collared Snow Geese from the 
Clay County flock were from the northwest. The NOURC was hesitant to 
add this species to the “Official Checklist” based upon the decision that a 
natural origin for this individual could not be established with certainty. 
Class VI. Accession # 1131. 

Brant {Branta bemicla ) 

1. A flock of 30-40, apparently mostly juveniles, was observed just south 
of Ponca, Dixon Co., 24 October 2006. Although suggestive, the 
description in this documentation lacked sufficient details for approval. 
Class IV. Accession # 1170. 

Garganey {Anas querquedula ) 

1. A written report was received of a single immature/female seen at 
Headworks Park, Nance Co., 12 October 2006. Although suggestive, the 
description in this documentation lacked sufficient details for approval. 
Class V. Accession # 1169. 

Wood Stork {Mycteria americana) 

1. A written report of a single bird seen just west of Greenwood along 
Hwy 6 (Cass Co.) in mid June 2006 may very well have been the same 
bird discovered near Ashland in August. Although very suggestive, the 




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Vol. 75 No. 3 


description in this documentation lacked sufficient details for approval. 
Class IV. Accession # 1144. 

Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis ) 

1. A “group (assuming family) flew in” along the Missouri River in Cedar 
Co., 31 July 2006. The description in this documentation lacked 
sufficient details for approval. Class VI. Accession # 1149. 

Black Rail {Laterallus jamaicensis) 

1. A written report was received of an adult bird observed at Fontenelle 
Forest wetlands, Sarpy Co., 27 August 2006. Although very suggestive, 
the description in this documentation lacked sufficient details for approval. 
Class V. Accession # 1156. 

Flammulated Owl {Otus flammeolus ) 

1. A bird identified by call was heard at Hackberry Lake, Valentine NWR, 
Cherry Co., 25 May 2007. Unfortunately, the bird was not seen or tape- 
recorded, and although the report was very plausible, the NOURC was 
hesitant to add this species to the “Official Checklist” based on a 
description of a call. Class IV. Accession # 1139. 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird {Archilochus colubris ) 

1. A single bird was photographed at a feeder in southern Sioux Co., 

25 July 2006. Although very suggestive, photographic evidence was 
insufficient to rule out similar species. Class IV. Accession # 1162. 

Hammond’s Flycatcher {Empidonax hammondii) 

1. A single bird was photographed near Refuge Headquarters, Crescent 
Lake NWR, Garden Co., 13 May 2006. Photographic evidence was 
insufficient to rule out similar species. Class IV. Accession # 1137. 

Smith’s Longspur {Calcarius pictus ) 

1. A written description was received of a group of birds northwest of 
Chadron, Dawes Co., 15 October 2006. Although very suggestive, the 
description in this documentation lacked sufficient details for approval. 
Class IV. Accession #1160. 

Lesser Goldfinch {Carduelis psaltria ) 

1. A description of a male bird coming to a feeder in Cheyenne Co., 16 
June 2006, was very suggestive but lacking in details. Class IV. 

Accession # 1140. 

Brambling {Fringilla montifringilla ) 

1. A single bird was observed at Rowe Sanctuary, Buffalo Co., 08 April 
2006. Although very suggestive, the description in this documentation 
lacked sufficient details for approval. Class IV. Accession # 1145. 



Vol. 75 No. 3 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


93 


Acknowledgments 

The NOU Records Committee would like to thank the following observers who 
contributed records included in this report: Jodi Bowley (JB), Tyler Bowley (TB), 
Mark A. Brogie (MAB), John Carlini (JC), Alex DeGarmo (AD), Kathy DeLara 
(KD), Stephen J. Dinsmore (SJD), Paul Dunbar (PD), Rick Eades (RE), Nathaniel 
Emery (NE), John Flavin (JF), Bob Grier (BG), Tyler Hicks (TH), Helen Hughson 
(HH), Bill Huser (BH), Marshall Iliff (MI), Joel Jorgensen (JJ), Emily Munter (EM), 
A1 Reyer (AR), Paul Roisen (PR), Shari Schwartz (SS), Kent Skaggs (KS), Audrey 
Sterkel (AS), T.J. Walker (TJW), and Cole Wild (CW). 

2006 NOU Records Committee members: Mark A. Brogie (chair), Paul 
Dunbar, Joe Gubanyi, Joel Jorgensen, W. Ross Silcock, Jerry Toll, and 
T.J, Walker. 


Literature Cited 

American Ornithologists’ Union [AOU]. “Forty-first Supplement to the 
AOU Checklist of North American Birds.” Auk 114 (1997): 542-552. 

-. The AOU Checklist of North American Birds , seventh edition. 

Washington D.C. 1998. 

-. “Forty-second Supplement to the AOU Checklist of North American 

Birds.” Auk 117 (2000): 847-858. 

-. “Forty-third Supplement to the AOU Checklist of North American 

Birds.” Auk 119 (2002): 897-906. 

-. “Forty-fourth Supplement to the AOU Checklist of North American 

Birds.” Auk 120 (2003): 923-931. 

-. “Forty-fifth Supplement to the AOU Checklist of North American 

Birds.” Auk 121 (2004): 985-995. 

-. “Forty-sixth Supplement to the AOU Checklist of North American 

Birds.” Auk 122 (2005): 1026-1031. 

-. “Forty-seventh Supplement to the AOU Checklist of North 

American Birds.” Auk 123 (2006): 926-936. 

Brogie, M.A. “1996 (Eighth) Report of the Nebraska Ornithologists’ 
Union [NOU] Records Committee.” The Nebraska Bird Review 65 
(1997): 115-126. 

- “1997 (Ninth) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 66 (1998): 147-159. 

-. “1998 (Tenth) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 67 (1999): 141-152. 










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Vol. 75 No. 3 


-. “2002 (14th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 71 (2003): 136-142. 

-. “2003 (15th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 72 (2004): 59-65. 

-. “2004 (16th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 73 (2005): 78-84. 

-. “2005 (17th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 74 (2006): 69-74. 

Grenon, A.G. “1990 (Third) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 58 (1990): 90-97. 

-. “1991 (Fourth) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 59 (1991): 150-155. 

Gubanyi, J.G. “1992, 1993 (Fifth) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 
The Nebraska Bird Review 64 (1996a): 30-35. 

-. “1994 (Sixth) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 64 (1996b): 38-42. 

-. “1995 (Seventh) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 64 (1996c): 132-138. 

Jorgensen, J.G. “1999 (11th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 69 (2001): 85-91. 

-. “2002 [sic] (12th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

(mistitled 2000 report) The Nebraska Bird Review 70 (2002): 84-90. 

-. “2001 (13th) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 71 (2003): 97-102. 

Mollhoff, WJ. “1989 (Second) Report of the NOU Records Committee.” 
The Nebraska Bird Review 57 (1989): 42-47. 

NOU Records Committee. “Bylaws of the NOU Records Committee.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 54 (1986): 72-74. 

-... “Official List of the Birds of Nebraska.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 56 (1988): 86-96. 

—~ “Official List of the Birds of Nebraska.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 65 (1997): 3-16. 

-. “Official List of the Birds of Nebraska: 2003.” 

The Nebraska Bird Review 72 (2004): 108-126. 














Vol.75 No. 3 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


35 


The Nebraska Bird Review is published quarterly by the Nebraska 
Ornithologists’ Union, Inc., as its official journal, and is sent to members not in 
arrears of dues. Annual subscription rates (on a calendar-year basis only): $15 in the 
United States, $18 in Canada and $30 in all other countries, payable in advance. 
Single copies are $4 each, postpaid, in the United States, $5 in Canada, and $8 
elsewhere. Send orders for back issues to Mary Lou Pritchard, NOU Librarian, c/o 
University of Nebraska State Museum, W-436 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588- 
0514. 

Memberships in the NOU (on a calendar-year basis only): Active, $15; 
Sustaining, $25; Student, $10; Family Active, $20; Family Sustaining, $30; Life, 
$250. Send dues and subscription requests to Betty Grenon, NOU Treasurer, (see 
address below) Contributions to the NOU are tax deductible. 

Send manuscripts and notes on bird sightings to Janis Paseka, Editor, (see 
address below) Send quarterly bird reports to Ross Silcock. (see address below) 


President and Newsletter Editor : Lanny Randolph, 50370 24th Road, Gibbon, NE 
68840-4065; virginiarail@nctc.net 

Vice-President : Urban Lehner, 15526 Pierce Circle, Omaha, NE 68144; 
urbanity@hotmail.com 

Secretary : Kevin Poague, 379 S. 46th St., Lincoln, NE; kpoague@audubon.org 

Treasurer : Betty Grenon, 1409 Childs Road East, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
grenon925@aol.com 

Librarian : Mary Lou Pritchard, 6325 O Street #515, Lincoln, NE 68510 

Difgfit PS S: 

Loren Padelford, 1405 Little John Road, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
lpdlfrd@juno.com (2008) 

Steve Lamphere, 3101 Washington St., Apt. 98, Bellevue, NE 68005; 
kingfisher65@aol.com (2009) 

Kathy DeLara, 170188 Spring Creek Road, Mitchell, NE 69357; 
renosmom@charter.net (2010) 

Records Committee Chairman : Mark Brogie, Box 316, Creighton, NE 68729; 
mbrogie@esu 1 .org 

Editor of The Nebraska Bird Review : Janis Paseka, 1585 Co. Rd. 14 Blvd., Ames, 
NE 68621; paseka76@gmail.com 

Occurrence Report Compiler : Ross Silcock, P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653; 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 

Breeding Bird-Atlas Prpjeemd NestRecpids Coordinator: Wayne Mollhoff, 

2354 Euclid St., Ashland NE 68003; wmollhoff@netscape.net 

NOU Website : http://rip.physics.unk.edu/NOU/ 


Nebraska Birdline : c/o Josef Kren 402-721-5487, ext. 6490, or 
800-642-8382, ext. 6490, or birdsne@yahoo.com 












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Summer Field Report, June - July 2007 by W. Ross Silcock 

2006 (18th) Report of the NOU Records Committee 

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Nebraska Bird Review (December 2007) 75(4), WHOLE ISSUE. Copyright 2007 Nebraska Ornithologists’ 
Union. Used by permission. 


The Nebraska Bird 
Review 

A Magazine of Ornithology of the 
Nebraska Region 

Volume 75 December 2007 Number 4 



Published by the 

Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union, Inc. 
Founded 1899 


Janis M. Paseka, Editor 
Stephen J. Dinsmore, Co-editor 


SSSN 0028-1816 





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Vol. 75 No. 4 


FALL FIELD REPORT, August-November 2007 
Compiled by W. Ross Silcock 
P.O. Box 57, Tabor, IA 51653 
silcock@rosssilcock.com 

INTRODUCTION 

This was essentially a normal fall season in Nebraska, with no major weather 
events or significant shifts in breeding or migration ranges, although a possible 
exception is a first record of Lesser Goldfmch breeding in the state. One observer 
made the point, though, that the hard freeze in the spring affected seed and fruit 
crops for fall, most conspicuously resulting in fewer large American Robin flocks. 
Excellent water conditions in the Rainwater Basin were welcome, but few herons and 
egrets were present, and no unusual breeding events were reported there. 

As winter approached, however, increased numbers of a few finch species 
were noted. Most conspicuous was Purple Finch, which was reported statewide, 
unusual in the west, where it is normally rare. Other species showing well were Pine 
Siskin and Red-breasted Nuthatch (OK, it’s not a finch!) Although Mountain 
Chickadee appeared in good numbers on the Colorado Plains, they were not much in 
evidence in Nebraska. 

A few species were found in notable numbers: scoters continued their upward 
trend of recent years, a flock of 30-35 Whooping Cranes must have spectacular, 
rather incredible flocks of Purple Martins went over Omaha, and 36 Nelson’s Sharp¬ 
tailed Sparrows were counted at one location. Other items of interest were the several 
species of shorebirds lingering rather late, the slow recovery of Black-capped 
Chickadees, and proof of a late summer influx and breeding by Marsh Wren, a 
phenomenon previously attributed mainly to Sedge Wren. 

Two species appeared in the east unexpectedly; a Broad-tailed Hummingbird in 
Bellevue was a first for that species in eastern Nebraska while a MacGillivray’s 
Warbler was photographed in Dodge Co. 

With a state list of 448, additions are tough to come by, but there were two 
this fall, an emaciated Royal Tern that generously decided to expire within the state 
boundaries, and at least one apparently all-dark frigatebird, unfortunately 
unidentifiable to species, but still the first documented frigatebird for the state. A 
pair of 5th state records was provided by a Gray Flycatcher and a Black-throated 
Gray Warbler. And we would be remiss if we failed to note that the Curve-billed 
Thrasher in Sioux Co will celebrate his 5th anniversary of residence there in October! 


ABBREVIATIONS 

ADF: Arbor Day Farm, Otoe Co 
BOL: Branched Oak L, Lancaster Co 
Cem: Cemetery 
Co(s): County(ies) 

CLNWR: Crescent L NWR, Garden Co 
FF: Fontenelle Forest, Sarpy Co 
GPD: Gavin's Point Dam: Knox/Cedar Cos 
HCR: Harlan Co Res SRA, Harlan Co 
L: Lake 

LM: L McConaughy, Keith Co 

LNB: Lakes North and Babcock, Platte Co 



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LO: L Ogallaia (includes contiguous Keystone L), Keith Co 

m. ob.: many observers 

NC: Nature Center 

NM: National Monument 

NWR: National Wildlife Refuge 

PL: Pawnee L, Lancaster Co 

Res: Reservoir 

RWB: Rainwater Basin, including parts of Phelps, Hamilton, York, Clay, Fillmore, 
and Thayer Cos 

SCP: Spring Creek Prairie, Lancaster Co 
SHP: State Historical Park 
SL: Sewage Lagoon(s) 

SP: State Park 

SRA: State Recreation Area 

WMA: (State) Wildlife Management Area 

WPA: (Federal) Waterfowl Production Area 

WSR: Wind Springs Ranch, Sioux Co 


GAZETTEER 

Calamus Res: SRA, Loup and Garfield Cos 

Chadron SP: Dawes Co 

Funk Lagoon: WPA, Phelps Co 

Harvard Marsh: WPA, Clay Co 

Oliver Res: SRA, Kimball Co 

Ponca SP: Dixon Co 

Sandhills: large area of sand-based prairie in north-central Nebraska 
Sutherland Res: SRA, Lincoln Co 


OBSERVERS 

AB: Aaron Brees, Des Moines, IA 

AD: Ann Duey, Scottsbluff 

ADo: Art Douglas, Bellevue 

AK: Alice Kenitz, Gering 

ARy: Allan Reyer, Bellevue 

BB: Bart Bly, Scottsbluff 

BT: Bruce Trindle, Norfolk 

C&DP: Con & Donna Pierson, Arcadia 

CH: Carolyn Hall, Bassett 

CNK: Clem N. Klaphake, Bellevue 

CW: Cole Wild, Columbus 

CWH: C.W. (Bill) Huntley, Ogallaia 

D&CN: Don and Colleen Noecker, Albion 

D&JP: Don & Jan Paseka, Ames 

D&RK: Dennis and Rhalene Katus, Bayard 

DL: Dan Leger, Lincoln 

DR: Dana Ripper, Scottsbluff 

DSt: Dave Stage, Elkhom 

EB: Elliott Bedows, Bellevue 




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EBa: Elaine Bachel, Lincoln 

ECT: Edna Claire Thomas, Morrill 

G&WH: Glen & Wanda Hoge, Alma 

GF: Greg Fletcher, Orchard 

GW: Gertrude Wood, Lincoln 

HKH: Helen K. Hughson, Mitchell 

JED: James E. Ducey, Lincoln 

JF: John Flavin, Chadron 

JG: Joe Gubanyi, Seward 

JGi: Jay Gilliam, Des Moines, IA 

JGJ: Joel G. Jorgensen, Lincoln 

JGr: Jonas Grundman, Omaha 

JJ: Jan Johnson, Wakefield 

JK: Jay Keller, Arlington, VA 

JLL: Jeanine L. Lackey, Ceresco 

JM: Jeanne Miller, Bennington 

JMi: John Miller, Lincoln 

JMu: Jerry Mulliken, Nickerson 

JR: Juanita Rice, Fairmont 

JRi: Justin Rink, Omaha 

KCR: Kathleen Crawford-Rose, Bellevue 

KD: Kathy DeLara, Mitchell 

KJ: Kim Janes, La Vista 

KP: Kevin Poague, Lincoln 

KS: Kent Skaggs, Kearney 

L&BP: Loren & Babs Padelford, Bellevue 

L&CF: Laurence & Carol Falk, Nebraska City 

LLB: Lauren Badura, Kearney 

LE: Larry Einemann, Lincoln 

LH: Luke Hamilton, Lewellen 

LR: Lanny Randolph, Gibbon 

LS: Larry Snyder, Kimball 

MB: Mark Brogie, Creighton 

MG: Mary Gertsema, Yankton, SD 

MM: Marty Mathieson, Shelton 

MT: Martha Tacha, Grand Island 

NB: Norma Brockmoller, Winside 

NF: Nancy Fish, Superior 

NOU: Nebraska Ornithologists’ Union Fall Meeting 

NP: Neva Pruess, Lincoln 

PD: Paul Dunbar, Hastings 

RD: Roger Dietrich, Yankton, SD 

RE: Rick Eades, Lincoln 

RG: Robert Gibson, Lincoln 

RGr: Ruth Green, Bellevue 

RH: Robin Harding, Gibbon 

RM: Robert Manning, Omaha 

RS: Rick Schmid, Omaha 

RSi: Rachel Simpson, Lincoln 

RW: Rick Wright, Tucson, AZ 

SJ: Stephen Jones, Boulder, CO 

SJD: Stephen J. Dinsmore, Ames, IA 



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SR: Sarah Rehme, Seward 
TG: Tom Gannon, Norfolk 
TH: Tim Hajda, Broken Bow 
TJW: T.J. Walker, Brady 
TL: Teri Lee, Peru 
TP: Theresa Pester, Walton 
UL: Urban Lehner, Omaha 
WF: William Flack, Madison 
WRS: W. Ross Silcock, Tabor, IA 


SPECIES ACCOUNTS 

Greater White-fronted Goose: Summer stragglers were 2 each in the e. RWB 31 
Aug (JGJ) and in Seward Co 4 Sep (JGJ). First migrant flocks were groups 
of 20-300 flying south over Lincoln Co 21 Oct, for an excellent fall tally of 
about 2000 (TJW). 

Snow Goose: The twelve which summered at Moses Hill L, Phelps Co, (JGJ) was 
an unusually large group. 

Ross’s Goose: Routine reports. 

Cackling Goose: One, now apparently a permanent fixture, continued at Schramm 
SP, Sarpy Co; it was there 8 Sep (L&BP). 

Canada Goose: Routine reports. 

Trumpeter Swan: Routine reports. 

Tundra Swan: None were reported; this is a rare fall migrant. 

Gadwall: Routine reports. 

American Wigeon: Routine reports. 

American Black Duck: None were reported; this is a rare fall migrant. 

Mallard: Routine reports. 

Blue-winged Teal: The 2200 at LM 15 Sep (SJD,JGi) was a good number; high 
fell counts are in the 4200-14,500 range. 

Cinnamon Teal: Fall reports are few, as this species becomes inconspicuous in 
eclipse plumage; however, one was identified in Scotts Bluff Co 22 Sep 
(AK), rather late. Also rare in the east in fall, one was at Moger Lagoon 
WPA, Clay Co, 18 Aug (JGJ, details). 

Northern Shoveler: Routine reports. 

Northern Pintail: The 437 at LM 24 Aug (SJD) was a good count that early; they 
may have been molt migrants. 

Green-winged Teal: A female with a brood of 7 was at Harvard Marsh 28 Jul (PD), 
only the 3rd nesting record for this species south of the Platte River. Large 
numbers congregate at LM in fall; 4026 were there 14 Sep (SJD,JGi). A 
sizable non-LM aggregation was the 2000 at Fairmont SL 11 Nov (PD). 

Canvasback: Routine reports. 

Redhead: A good tally was the 1416 in Lancaster Co 2 Nov (LE). 

Ring-necked Duck: A little early was one at BOL 25 Sep (LE). 

Greater Scaup: Good numbers, a total of about 30, were reported, earliest singles 
rather early at BOL 28 Oct (JGJ) and Bluestem L, Lancaster Co, the same 
day (JGJ). 

Lesser Scaup: The 800 at BOL 8 Nov (JGJ) was a good count. 



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Surf Scoter: Three of the 4 sightings were of singles, the other a flock of 9 female/ 
immature birds at BOL 9 Nov (JGJ,LE), a record high fall count for the 
state. Others were at L Yankton, Cedar Co, 27 Oct (RD), Harvard Marsh, 
an immature (PD, photo), and LO 14 Nov (RE). 

White-winged Scoter: Strangely few in recent years, this fall three were reported: a 
rather early female/ immature at Holmes L, Lincoln, 16 Oct (RG), another 
at Alma SL 12 Nov (PD), and one unidentified to age/gender at LO 14 Nov 
(RE). 

Black Scoter: Second best fall count on record was the 6 at BOL 18 Nov (JGJ); 
also, 2 were at L Yankton, Cedar Co, 27 Oct (RD), and a female/immature 
at PL 9 Nov (JGJ). 

Long-tailed Duck: The only 3 reported were a first fall female at LO 13 Nov (RE), 
an immature at PL 15 Nov (JGJ), and a single in Knox Co 24 Nov (MB). 

Bufflehead: Routine reports. 

Common Goldeneye: Routine reports. 

Hooded Merganser: Routine reports. 

Common Merganser: Routine reports. 

Red-breasted Merganser: About 15 were reported 3-22 Nov, a typical fall for this 
species, generally uncommon in Nebraska. 

Ruddy Duck: Routine reports. 

Gray Partridge: The only report from the northeast was of 2 in Knox Co 24 Nov 
(MB). The small population in s. Sioux Co persists, with a small flock 
seen from time to time at WSR (HKH). 

Ring-necked Pheasant: Routine reports. 

Sharp-tailed Grouse: Routine reports. 

Greater Prairie-Chicken: Reports were from expected areas, although a flock of 
about 20 was using an alfalfa field near a playa wetland in Lincoln Co 20 
Oct (TJW), a reassuring habitat selection. 

Wild Turkey: Routine reports. 

Northern Bobwhite: Routine reports. 

Red-throated Loon: After a lull of a few years, two juveniles popped up this year: 
one was photographed at Harvard Marsh 4 Nov (PD) and another juvenile 
was at Willow Creek Res, Pierce Co, 5 Nov (MB). 

Pacific Loon: None were reported; this is a regular, rare fall migrant. 

Common Loon: Good numbers, about 25, were reported, mostly in the east, as 
expected, although there were sightings at LM of a single bird, probably the 
same bird which may have summered there, 8 and 24 Aug and 14 Sep 
(SJD,JGi), and another there 30 Nov (JGJ). Earliest migrant was rather early 
in Sarpy Co 16 Sep (CNK), and 3 were at BOL 28 Nov (LE). 

Pied-billed Grebe: Routine reports. 

Horned Grebe: About 8 were reported, a normal fall, 12 Sep-26 Nov. 

Red-necked Grebe: More often reported in recent years, this fall a basic adult, 
possibly the same bird seen in recent falls, was at BOL 15-18 Nov 
(JGJ,LE). 

Eared Grebe: Migrants appear south of the breeding range in late Aug; this fall one 
was at LO 24 Aug (SJD), another was at Funk Lagoon 27 Aug (NF) and 15 
were in Webster Co 29 Aug (WF), 

Western Grebe: Aggregations become noticeable by late Jul; 1400 were at 
Sutherland Res 26 Aug (SJD) and 12,000 at LM 14 Sep ((SJD,JGi). 
“Thousands” were still there in mid-Nov (RE). In the east, where 
uncommon, one was in Lancaster Co 22 Sep (PD), and 2 were at BOL 10 
Oct (LE) and 21 Oct (JGJ); singles were there 25 Oct and 9 Nov (LE). 



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Clark’s Grebe: The 3 reports were of 3 at Sutherland Res 11 Aug (SJD), 5 at LM 

25 Aug (SJD), and one at Diamond Bar L, McPherson Co 8 Sep (TJW). At 
present it is unknown whether breeding occurs at Diamond Bar L. 

American White Pelican: Largest flocks reported were moderate: 400 at both 
Cottonwood WPA, Phelps Co, 31 Aug (JGJ) and BOL 11 Sep (JGJ), with 
378 at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi). 

Double-crested Cormorant: The 254 at LM 24 Aug was a good number for the 
date; a nest was noted as well (SJD,JGi), one of the two found in summer. 
Best count was an impressive 4000 at HCR 14 Oct (G&WH), although “a 
few thousand” were at BOL 1 Oct (JGJ). 

Frigatebird sp: Reports of a probable Magnificent Frigatebird(s) from northeast 
Nebraska 28 Aug-8 Sep following Hurricane Dean’s passage through the 
Yucatan Peninsula generated excitement; these brief sightings fit with 
observations of an adult female Magnificent Frigatebird in northwest Iowa 
2-3 Sep. First was a photograph taken of a bird near Norfolk 28 Aug (TG, 
BT; photo); although clearly a frigatebird, no coloration other than black is 
visible in the rather distant photograph. Then followed brief sightings of 
apparent ffigatebird(s) on Lewis and Clark Lake, Knox Co, 7-8 Sep 
(MB,D&CN) and a report of an all-dark bird with a forked tail below the 
dam 8 Sep (MG). It is possible that these sightings were all of a single 
individual. 

American Bittern: Singles at LM 8 Aug (SJD) and in the e. RWB 11 Aug (JGJ) 
may have been breeding; fall migration begins in late Aug. Several 
migrants were reported south of the Platte River, latest one rather late at 
Harvard Marsh 11 Nov (PD). There are only about 5 later records. 

Least Bittern: The only report was of probably the same bird (or possibly each bird 
of a pair) at North Lake Basin, Seward Co, 4 and 11 Aug (JGJ); the species 
was found there Jun 1996 also, and breeding is likely. 

Great Blue Heron: Routine reports. 

Great Egret: Numbers were significantly lower in the e. RWB this fall (JGJ,RE), 
and best count was a mediocre 26 at HCR 28 Aug (WF); fall high counts 
are in the 130-150 range. Uncommon westward, one was at LM 24 Aug 
(SJD). 

Snowy Egret: About 17 were reported, including 12 at LM 25 Aug (SJD). High fall 
counts are in the 30-60 range. 

Little Blue Heron: The only reports were of a juvenile near Harvard 7 Aug 
(PD,CW) and two sightings of probably the same juvenile at Funk Lagoon 

26 and 31 Aug (KS,JGJ). 

Cattle Egret: Only about 50 were reported, best count only 17, in Knox Co, 13 Sep 
(MB). High counts are in the 400-600 range. 

Green Heron: None were reported west of Thomas Co, where one was found 1 Sep 
(MB,DSt). 

Black-crowned Night-Heron: Routine reports. 

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron: None were reported; this is a regular late summer- 
early fall visitor in low numbers. 

White-faced Ibis: Summer aggregations in the Sandhills can be large; an excellent 
tally was the 245 in Grant Co 4 Aug (DSt). Most observers carefully report 
dark ibises as “Plegadis sp.”; some 150 were reported statewide. One at 
Funk Lagoon 20 Oct (TH) was rather late, but a “dark ibis” in Lincoln 11 
Nov (RSi fide JGJ) was only the 3rd Nov record for the state. 

Turkey Vulture: The 200 at PL 17 Sep (GW,EBa) was an excellent count. 



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Osprey: Reports were numerous 25 Aug-5 Nov, the expected migration period. Best 
count was 8, at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi) and in Scotts Bluff Co 7 Oct (KD). 

Mississippi Kite: Last one reported at Ogallala was an immature 13 Sep (CWH). 

Bald Eagle: Routine reports. 

Northern Harrier: Routine reports. 

Sharp-shinned Hawk: Routine reports. 

Cooper’s Hawk; This species is becoming more numerous, with sightings 
statewide, notably in summer. Best count was 10, in sw. Nebraska 25 Oct 
(TJW). 

Northern Goshawk: The only report was of a juvenile near Niobrara 24 Nov (MB). 

Red-shouldered Hawk: One was at FF, a regular site, 8 Sep (JRi). Reports from 
places other than FF are increasing, notably in Lancaster Co; singles, likely 
the same bird, were at PL 2 and 28 Nov (LE). 

Broad-winged Hawk: Reports at FF 9 and 12 Aug, the latter chasing a Red-tailed 
Hawk (L&BP), suggest breeding in the area. Westerly were a juvenile at LO 
14 Sep (SJD,JGi) and a single at Oliver Res 15 Sep (SJD,JGi). These are 
only the 16th and 17th reports away from the east. 

Swainson’s Hawk: This species appears to be doing well in the sw. Panhandle, 
where 107 occupied nests, averaging 2-3 chicks, were located during the 
summer (BB). Unusual in summer in the e. RWB, one was seen 4 Aug 
(JGJ). Migrants were reported through 10 Oct, one at SCP (KP), with best 
count “thousands” in a Rock Co field 29 Sep (CH). Such large 
congregations are not unprecedented for this species in Nebraska. 

Red-tailed Hawk: This species can be numerous in peak migration; 33 were seen in 
2 hours in Hamilton, Polk, and Merrick Cos 4 Nov, including 2 “Harlan’s” 
types and a dark western type (D&JP). A “Krider’s” type was near Omaha 
29 Nov (JRi). 

Ferruginous Hawk: Being a species of concern, encouraging were the 35 active 
nests with at least 69 chicks in the Panhandle this summer; most were in 
Kimball Co and in the Niobrara River Valley (BB). There was a noticeable 
concentration of dark morphs in Morrill Co (BB). Good details were 
provided for an immature observed for about 2 hours in Douglas Co 19 Oct 
(CH); this is only the 3rd documented record for the east. 

Rough-legged Hawk: Earliest reported was near Grand Island 9 Oct (LR,RH), about 
on time. 

Golden Eagle: A total of 18 nests with 1-2 chicks each was located in the sw. 
Panhandle this summer (BB). A juvenile at L Ogallala 13 Sep (JRi) may 
have been a newly-fledged bird; interestingly, 2 adults were in Keith Co 11 
Aug (SJD), unexpected this far east at that date. The most recent breeding 
record for Keith Co was in 1982. 

American Kestrel: Routine reports. 

Merlin: Earliest migrants are usually of the northerly-breeding long-distance 
subspecies columbarius; indeed, two of the 3 earliest reports this fall were 
identified as this taxon: 24 Aug at LM (SJD), and a female at LNB 9 Sep 
(JGJ). 

Prairie Falcon: A few occur eastward in winter, with earliest sightings usually in 
late Sep; one was in the e. RWB “early” on 4 Sep (JGJ), one was in Knox 
Co 12 Sep (MB), and another was in Buffalo Co 14 Sep (LB). 

Peregrine Falcon: The earliest fall records are in late Jul and such early sightings 
tend to be of juveniles. Fitting this pattern was a juvenile at LM 8 Aug 
(SJD). 




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Virginia Rail: One in the e. RWB 25 Aug (JGJ) was likely a migrant, although 
breeding has occurred there. 

Sora: Although there are several recent breeding season (Jun-early Jul) reports for the 
RWB and some old breeding records, the only recent breeding record is of a 
pair with a fully-grown juvenile at Funk Lagoon 9 Sep (LR,RH). Migrants 
appear in late Jul and become numerous in Aug; a record fall count of 42 
was made in the e. RWB 25 Aug (JGJ). 

American Coot: Routine reports. 

Sandhill Crane: The pair in Morrill Co (see Summer Report) raised a single chick, 
which was first seen in flight 1 Aug; by 13 Aug the family was moving 
around a lot (D&RK fide KD). Best counts of migrants were excellent, and 
were both on a strong cold front 20 Oct; 4000-5000 in Lincoln Co (TJW), 
and “thousands” in Scotts Bluff Co (AK). Easterly were 160 flying over the 
Seward-Lancaster Cos line 16 Nov (LE). 

Whooping Crane: As the size of the Great Plains flock increases, sightings of 
flocks in Nebraska are increasing also. An amazing 30-35 were at Valentine 
NWR 20 Oct (fide MT), and a flock of 9 adults and a juvenile in Sherman 
Co 28-29 Oct were photographed (C&DP); 10 birds near Alda 29 Oct 
(CNK) were likely the same flock. An additional 20-25 were reported (fide 
MT). 

Black-bellied Plover: Routine reports. 

American Golden-Plover: The usual few were noted; as expected, most were 
juveniles. Rare westward, a juvenile was atLM 14 Sep (SJD). Best count 
was 20 near Goehner 4 Oct (JGJ). 



Whooping Cranes on 28 Oct 2007 along the Middle Loup River in Sherman 
County, southeast of Arcadia, Photo courtesy of Donna Pierson. 




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Snowy Plover: The only reports were of a single 4 Aug at Springer WPA, Hamilton 
Co, the first fall record for the e. RWB (JGJ, photo), and 2-4 at LM 8 Aug- 
14 Sep (SJD,JGi), including a brood of 2 on 24 Aug (SJD). 

Semipalmated Plover: A new fall record count (by one) was the 23 at LM 14 Sep 
(SJD, JGi). 

Piping Plover: The only reports were from LM, where 23 were counted 8 Aug and 
39 on 24 Aug (SJD). Although there is some habitat reduction resulting 
from rising water levels, 2007 was the 2nd-best year for nests with 245; the 
number of fledged chicks, however, was down somewhat at 235, resulting 
in 0.96 chicks fledged per nest, compared with the average of 1.49 for 
1992-2007 (Payton and Wilson, “Least Tern and Piping Plover Nest 
Monitoring Final Report 2007”; Central Nebraska Public Power and 
Irrigation District, Holdrege). 

Killdeer: Rather late for the number were the 137 near Holdrege 5 Nov; 82 were still 
there 12 Nov (PD). 

Mountain Plover: Recent years have yielded excellent counts of nests by Prairie 
Partners; this year 112 nests were found and “cleared” (marked and 
protected) in Kimball, Cheyenne, and Banner Cos; these had 85% hatching 
success, with the few failures due mainly to predation and cultivation (BB). 
The flock of 78 in s. Kimball Co, 3 Sep (LS), must have been quite a 
sight; a flock of 28 juveniles was found in Kimball Co 28 Aug 2006 (LS). 
Last reported was an adult in Kimball Co 15 Sep (SJD,JGi), 2nd-latest on 
record. 

Black-necked Stilt: The only reports were from Funk Lagoon, where 2 juveniles 
(part of a family group first seen there in Jul) and up to 3 adults were 
present 11 Aug- 3 Sep (SJD, m. ob.). This is the 2nd breeding record at 
Funk Lagoon, the other was in 2003. 

American Avocet: The 643 at Lakeside 16 Sep (SJD^IGi) was a fall record. 

Spotted Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Solitary Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Greater Yellowlegs: The 56 at LM 24 Aug (SJD) was an excellent fall tally, as was 
the 47 near Holdrege 5 Nov (PD); the single near Holdrege 12 Nov (PD) 
was a bit tardy. 

Willet: This species is rare in the east in fall, and so the 2 reports were significant: 
singles were in York Co 8 Sep, the 3rd Sep record for the e. RWB (JGJ), 
and at LNB 22 Sep (PD). 

Lesser Yellowlegs: The 2 near Holdrege 5 Nov (PD) were a little late. 

Upland Sandpiper: Routine reports. 

Long-billed Curlew: Small flocks flying over 1-80 in w. Nebraska 11 Sep (JRi) 
were a little late; late dates are 15, 18, and 19 Sep. 

Marbled Godwit: Routine reports. 

Ruddy Turnstone: At least 3 were reported, only the 20th and 21st fall records: 
single birds were reported at LNB 10-16 Sep (SJD,WF,LE) and two were at 
Springer WPA, Hamilton Co, 14 Sep (RE). 

Red Knot: Only the 26th and 27th fall reports of this rare migrant were of a molting 
adult at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi) and a juvenile at Calamus Res 23 Sep 
(WRS). 

Sanderling: The 179 at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi) was a record fall count. 

Semipalmated Sandpiper: The 266 at LM 24 Aug (SJD,JGi) was an excellent 
count. 




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Western Sandpiper: The only reports were of 4 in the e. RWB 18 Aug, the first 
there for a long while (JGJ), 2 on 24 Aug in Lancaster Co (LE), 7 on 24 
Aug and 9 on 25 Aug at LM (SJD), and a single in Scotts Bluff Co 22 Sep 
(AK). 

Least Sandpiper: By far a record fall count was the 899 at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi). 
Sometimes a rather late migrant, 2 were in Polk Co 28 Oct (LR,RH), and 3 
were near Holdrege 12 Nov (PD); late dates are Nov 23, 23, and 27, and 
there are 3 Dec records. 

Baird’s Sandpiper: Three near Holdrege 5 Nov (PD) were tardy; late dates are Nov 
7, 8, and 10, with a few later Nov records and two for Dec. 

Pectoral Sandpiper: Six near Holdrege 5 Nov were tardy also; late dates are Nov 9, 
9, and 9, with a few Nov records and one for Dec. 

Dunlin: Generally a late migrant also, with adults migrating later with juveniles, 
the 3 reports were of singles at BOL 15 Oct (JGJ), near Holdrege 5 Nov 
(PD), and at LO 30 Nov (JGJ), the latter a record late date by 4 days. 

Stilt Sandpiper: The 396 at LM 14 Sep (SJD,Gi) was a good count. One near 
Holdrege 5 Nov (PD) was the latest on record by 3 days. 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper: Rare westerly were 4 juveniles at LM 24 Aug (SJD); 
although the fall migration corridor is wider than in spring, most reports are 
from central and eastern Nebraska. 

Short-billed Dowitcher: All reports were of juveniles, as are most fall reports for 
this species. Some 15+ were reported 18 Aug-22 Sep, all but one in the 
RWB. The latter was a juvenile at LNB 22 Sep (PD), the latest fall date for 
the state by 2 days. 

Long-billed Dowitcher: Two near Holdrege 12 Nov (PD) were tardy; late dates are 
Nov 13, 18, and 19, and there are 3 Dec records. 

Wilson’s Snipe: Three in the e. RWB 18 Aug (JGJ) were likely migrants; the 
summer status of this species there is not well known. Juveniles appear first 
in fall, as early as early Aug. 

American Woodcock: None were reported; this is a regular fall migrant. 

Wilson’s Phalarope: Routine reports. 

Red-necked Phalarope: The 29 at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi) was a record fall count; 18 
were in Sheridan Co 15 Sep (SJD,JGi). 

Red Phalarope: A basic adult at Lakeside 15 Sep 2007 (SJD,JGi; details) was only 
the 12th fall record. 

Pomarine Jaeger: An observer experienced with jaegers reported one as “jaeger, sp.” 
but was 95% certain that it was this species at LM 24 Aug (SJD). The date 
is rather early but not unprecedented for this species. 

Laughing Gull: A second-winter bird was chummed in with popcorn at Lewis and 
Clark L, Knox Co, 3 Oct (MB). 

Franklin’s Gull: The usual huge numbers passed through between mid-Sep and 
mid-Oct. Highest estimate received was the 100,000 over Lewis & Clark L, 
Knox Co, 12 Sep (MB), 2nd highest on record. One at LNB 22 Nov was 
tardy (TJW); only 4 were reported after mid-Oct. 

Bonaparte’s Gull: Normal numbers passed through starting 22 Sep (one at LNB, 
PD), and 8 were still at LM at the end of the period (JGJ). A good count 
was the 200 at HCR 12 Nov (PD). 

Ring-billed Gull: Routine reports. 

California Gull: The only reports were of 151 at LM 24 Aug (SJD), a fall record 
count, but only 19 were there 30 Nov (JGJ); a few generally linger into late 
Dec, with occasional wintering. 



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Herring Gull: An adult in Knox Co 3 Oct (MB) was early; there are only about 5 
earlier fall dates for adults, only 3 prior to Oct. Also early was a first basic 
at LM 8 Aug (SJD). 

Thayer’s Gull: The only report of this regular fall migrant was of one at LO 14 
Nov (RE). 

Lesser Black-backed Gull: This regular migrant is being reported more often. A 
molting adult was rather early at LM 25 Aug (SJD), 2 adults (alternate and 
molting adult) were there 14 Sep (SJD,JGi), and, likely one of these, a 
single was there 13 Nov (RE). 

Glaucous Gull: Just making it into the Fall Report was an adult on a small pond at 
Ogallala 30 Nov (JGJ), one of the earliest arrival dates for an adult. 

Great Black-backed Gull: The only report of this casually-occumng species was of 
an adult at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi; photo). This is only the 8th fall record, 
about the 20th overall. 

Sabine’s Gull: Some 20-25 were reported statewide 2 Sep-21 Oct. The 2 Sep 
sightings, one in Knox Co (MB,DSt) and the other at LM (MB) are the 
2nd-earliest ever, while one at Capitol Beach L, Lincoln, 21 Oct (JGJ) was 
rather late. Best counts were 5 at LM 14 Sep (SJD,JGi) and 4 at Capitol 
Beach L, Lincoln, 4 Oct (JGJ). An adult at Alma SL 8 Oct (KS) and 16 
Oct (G&WH) was only the 5th adult on record. 

Black-legged Kittiwake: None were reported; this species is a rare Nov migrant. 

Least Tern: As with Piping Plovers, Least Terns had a good season at LM, with at 
least 50 adults associated with 29 nests that fledged 1.00 chicks per 
breeding pair (Payton and Wilson, cited above). The number of nests at LM 
has increased steadily from the mid-1990s, with 2007 the highest so far, 
although the ratio of young fledged per nest has declined from a peak in 
2004 (Payton and Wilson). At least 11 adults were still present at LM 8 
Aug (SJD). 

Caspian Tern: One at Capitol Beach L, Lincoln, 10 Oct (LE) was about the 4th 
latest on record. About 6 others were reported, an average fall for the 
species. 

Black Tern: An excellent count was the 349 at LM 24 Aug (SJD). 

Common Tern: Of the 8 or so reported, most were at BOL rather late, with an adult 
and a juvenile there 26 Oct (JGJ), 2nd-latest on record. BOL hosted 1-5 in 
the period 24 Sep (LE) through 26 Oct (JGJ), with 5 present 15 Oct (JGJ), 
itself a rather late date. 

Forster’s Tern: The 64 at LM 8 Aug (SJD) was a good count. This species also 
lingered at BOL, with a single still present 20 Oct (JGJ). There are only 
about 20 records for Oct, and latest date is 1 Nov. 

Royal Tern: Very exciting for birders (but not the tern) was one at LNB 8-10 Sep; 
it was found and photographed 8 Sep (D&JP), determined to be seriously 
emaciated 9 Sep (JGJ), seen barely living on 10 Sep (SJD) and found dead 
later the same day (WF). It was recovered as a specimen for the State 
Museum (JGJ). This is the first confirmed state record; there is a sight 
record for Sarpy Co 13 Sep 1993 that was not accepted by the Nebraska 
Records Committee. 

Rock Pigeon: Routine reports. 

Eurasian Collared-Dove: Numbers continue to increase, as indicated by the start of 
winter flocking; best count was only moderate, 35 in Dixon Co 17 Oct (JJ). 

White-winged Dove: Now regular in occurrence in summer and into mid-Oct, the 
expected few reports came to hand: one was in Fairmont 2 and 5 Aug (JR), 
two were in Lincoln 21 Sep (RE), unusual in that few are reported from 





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large cities, and one was in a Norfolk yard 30 Nov (RS). The latter is only 
the 5th record in the period mid-Oct through mid-Apr. 

Mourning Dove: A bold attempt to count this species in fall in the Sandhills 
resulted in a record number of 4000+ in Cheny Co 1 Sep (CNK). This 
species is indeed abundant there. 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo: One in Deuel Co 22 Sep (WF) was rather late, although 
there are records well into Oct for Nebraska (Birds of Nebraska). Perhaps 
these should be re-examined. 

Black-billed Cuckoo: The usual few reports continue for this low-density summer 
resident: singles were at FF 11 Aug (EB) and ADF 31 Aug (L&CF). An 
immature in Seward 25 Sep (JG) was rather late, although there are dates for 
Oct. 

Barn Owl: Reports continued from nesting sites near Creighton and Ulysses; at 
Creighton young were seen for the 3rd year on 12 Aug (MB), and at 
Ulysses 3 young were seen 11 Aug with an adult (RE). Singles were noted 
at LO 24 Aug and 14 Sep (SJD), where the species has been found roosting 
in cedars recently. Others were near Brule 8 Aug (SJD), at Swanson Res, 
Hitchcock Co, 6 Sep (D&JP), and one was rather late in Scotts Bluff Co 20 
Oct (AK). 

Eastern Screech-Owl: Routine reports. 

Great Horned Owl: Routine reports. 

Burrowing Owl: Prairie Partners surveys in the Panhandle showed only half as 
many owls as in 2006, with possible reasons for the decline poisoning of 
and plague in prairie-dogs (BB). 

Barred Owl: Routine reports. 

Long-eared Owl: Routine reports. 

Short-eared Owl: Routine reports. 

Common Nighthawk: Oct reports are few; several flew over Omaha 1 Oct (JRi). 

Common Poorwill: Easterly migrants are not unprecedented, but still a surprise was 
one with Common Nighthawks over Lincoln 24 Sep; it lacked wing-bars 
and had smaller wings with more rounded wing-tips than the nighthawks 
(LE). A road-killed bird was found near Halsey 29 Sep (WM), a live bird 
was seen in flight there 30 Sept (LE et al.) and one was seen in the 
Thedford cemetery on 30 Sept (D&JP). 

Chuck-wilPs Widow: None were reported; the few fall records are in Aug. 

Whip-poor-will: None were reported; departure is during Aug and Sep. 

Chimney Swift: The 532+ at a single Omaha chimney 7 Sep (RE) was a record fall 
count, edging out the 532 seen at a Lincoln chimney 17 Sep (JED). The 
single-chimney record is up for grabs! Two at Alma 1 Oct (G&WH) were a 
bit tardy for that location. 

White-throated Swift: The only report was of 8 at Scotts Bluff NM, Scotts Bluff 
Co, 15 Sep (SJD,JGi). 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: There were numerous reports through 9 Oct (LE), 
with best count 20 at feeders in Peru 10 Sep (TL). Westerly were a female 
at a Mitchell feeder 29-30 Aug (KD; details) and a single in Ogallala 26 
Aug (CWH). 

Calliope Hummingbird: Sightings of singles at a feeder near Mitchell 4 Aug-1 Oct 
involved at least 4 different birds; on Oct 1 the female/immature present 
then was braving temperatures around 35 degrees (KD). The latter is the 
latest date by 2 days. 

Broad-tailed Hummingbird: There were two reports, one routine, the other 
definitely not. Routine, although rather late, was a female near Mitchell 21- 




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23 Sep (KD). On the other hand, one attended a Bellevue feeder 17 Oct-3 
Dec (ADo; L&BP photo; RGr photo). Intriguingly, a hummingbird was 
seen at another Bellevue feeder about 800 yards from this one 16 Oct, when 
no other hummers had been seen for 15 days (ARy). This is the easternmost 
record for Nebraska; the late date is typical of vagrant western hummers 
eastward. 

Rufous Hummingbird: The only reports were of an adult male in Kimball 11 Aug 
(SJD) and a single near Mitchell 17 Aug (KD). 

Belted Kingfisher: Routine reports. 

Red-headed Woodpecker: Movement in the west was clearly underway 24 Aug, 
when 28 were found at LM (SJD), an unusually high number for the 
westerly location. Highest fall counts in the east are in early Sep. 

Red-bellied Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker: Perhaps more than usual for fall, 4 singles were reported 
in the southeast during Nov (KCR,JJ,RWJMi). 

Red-naped Sapsucker: The only report of this casual fall migrant was of a male 
photographed at Oliver Res 15 Sep (SJD,JGi). There are now about 10 fall 
reports. 

Downy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Hairy Woodpecker: Routine reports. 

Northern Flicker: Routine reports. 

Pileated Woodpecker: The 4 reports were from known locations, FF (JRi,CNK), 
and se. Otoe Co (L&CF). 

Olive-sided Flycatcher: There were several reports 11 Aug-8 Sep, including 2 birds 
westerly, where rare, in Morrill Co 27 Aug (KD). 

Western Wood-Pewee: Routine reports. 

Eastern Wood-Pewee: The 25 at FF 6 Sep (JRi) was an excellent count. 

Alder Flycatcher: The only reports were of a singing bird at FF 10 Aug (L&BP) 
and a single in Dixon Co 16 Sep (JJ). Latest documented report is 4 Sep. 

Willow Flycatcher: Routine reports. 

Least Flycatcher: Routine reports. 

Hammond’s Flycatcher: The only reports of this regular but rare Panhandle fall 
migrant were of one at Bushnell 15 Sep (SJD,JGi) and two at Oliver Res 1 
Sep (JGJ). There are now about 24 fall records. 

Gray Flycatcher: One was seen at WSR 27 Aug (HKH, details), only the 5th 
Nebraska record, those in the period 24 Aug-5 Oct. 

Dusky Flycatcher: Also a rare but regular Panhandle fall migrant, at least two and 
possibly 4 were reported: sightings of possibly the same bird at Oliver Res 
8 Sep (AB), 13 Sep (JRi), and 15 Sep (SJD,JGi), and another at Bushnell 
15 Sep (SJD,JGi). 

Cordilleran Flycatcher: Migrants are not often reported, but 3 singles were found 
this fall: one in extreme se. Sioux Co 18 Aug (KD), one at WSR 27 Aug 
(HKH), and one in s. Sioux Co 29 Aug (KD). The 15 available fall records 
show a migration period 9 Aug-11 Sep. 

Eastern Phoebe: One at FF 23 Oct (L&BP) was rather late; there are a few Nov 
records. 

Say’s Phoebe: This species is rare eastward in fall, possibly occurring regularly in 
small numbers east to Polk Co, where a juvenile was found 16 Sep 
(LR,RH); another juvenile was in Merrick Co 22 Sep (LR,RH). One in 
Blaine Co 29 Sep (fide UL) was rather late. 

Ash-throated Flycatcher: The last sighting of the birds which nested in Kimball 
Co was of an adult 11 Aug (SJD). 



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Great Crested Flycatcher: Routine reports. 

Cassin’s Kingbird: This species leaves later than the other kingbirds; 4 were in 
Garden Co 21 Sep (WF). Late dates are Sep 25, 26, and 27. 

Western Kingbird: The 70+ in Cherry Co 1 Sep (CNK) was an excellent count. 

Eastern Kingbird: A rather amazing count was the record 500+ in Cherry Co 1 Sep 
(CNK). 

Northern Shrike: Routine reports. 

Loggerhead Shrike: Routine reports. 

Bell’s Vireo: One at Peru 1 Oct (TL) was rather late; Oct records are few. 

Yellow-throated Vireo: One at Ponca SP 25 Sep (L&BP) was tardy. 

Plumbeous Vireo: One at Chadron SP 12 Sep (JRi) was likely a migrant, and 
somewhat tardy; breeding there is unconfirmed. 

Cassin’s Vireo: The only reports were somewhat east of the usual w. Panhandle 
route: singles in Hyannis Cem 1 Sep (MB,DSt) and Tryon 1 Sep 
(MB,DSt) were only the 3rd and 4th east of the Panhandle. 

Blue-headed Vireo: One at ADF 23 Oct (L&CF) was rather late; there are a few 
Nov records. Somewhat westerly were two in Merrick Co 22 Sep (LR,RH). 

Warbling Vireo: One at Ponca SP 25 Sep (L&BP) was getting a bit late; late dates 
are in early Oct. 

Philadelphia Vireo: The 5 sightings were of singles at FF rather early on 11 Aug 
(EB) and another there 29 Aug (JRi), in Lancaster Co 30 Aug (LE), in 
Bellevue 3 Sep (CNK), and in Saline Co 5 Sep (LE). This is a typical fall 
showing. 

Red-eyed Vireo: Routine reports. 

Blue Jay: Routine reports. 

Pinyon Jay: None were reported. This species has been scarce in recent years. 

Clark’s Nutcracker: This species has a propensity for individuals to appear in odd 
locations at unpredictable times; one was photographed near Orchard 9 Sep 
(GF fide KP). 

Black-billed Magpie: Easterly were 2 in Hamilton Co 4 Nov (D&JP). Concern 
about low numbers continues in some areas; none have been seen in 
Lincoln Co for a while (TJW), and one in Harlan Co 11 Nov was the first 
there since Apr 2006 (G&WH). 

American Crow: Two flocks totaling some 1600-1750 crows were in Custer Co 14 
Nov (RE); there are previous counts in the 2000-3000 range. 

Common Raven: Intriguing was a sighting of at least one in Cherry Co 29 Sep 
(CNK et al). The location of the sighting was not far from where a raven 
was seen in Valentine NWR, Cherry Co, 28 Oct 2006, raising the 
possibility of a small population in the area, or even a family group 
returning in fall to the area. 

Horned Lark: Routine reports. 

Purple Martin: Amazing counts of flocks flying over Omaha were 2000-4000 on 16 
Aug and 12,000-15,000 on 20 Aug (JRi). This species gathers in huge fall 
roosts prior to migration, and these large groups migrate together. Last at 
Creighton nest boxes departed 2 Aug (MB) and an Ogallala nest box was 
abandoned 4 Aug (CWH). One with nighthawks over Omaha 1 Oct (JRi) 
was rather late. 

Tree Swallow: Routine reports. 

Violet-green Swallow: None were reported; departure is in early Aug. 

Northern Rough-winged Swallow: The 1000 in Cherry Co 25 Aug (JJ) was a 
record fall count. 

Bank Swallow: Routine reports. 



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Cliff Swallow: Routine reports. 

Barn Swallow: Second broods were fledged in Buffalo Co 4 and 9 Aug (MM) and 
5 Aug (LR,RH), and in se. Sioux Co 18 Aug (KD). One in Lancaster Co 
29 Oct (RE) was rather late. 

Black-capped Chickadee: Careful tracking of chickadees during extensive coverage 
of Lancaster Co over the last few years by Larry Einemann indicates that 
numbers are still reduced, and that chickadees are recovering slowly and 
“very localized”. This status appears to apply to the large areas of southern 
Nebraska where chickadee numbers have declined in recent years. 

Mountain Chickadee: The only reports were of one near Lewellen 30 Sep (LH, 
details) and another visiting a Scotts Bluff Co feeder 24 Oct through the 
period (AD). This species moves onto the plains east of the Rockies on 
occasion. 

Tufted Titmouse: Routine reports. 

Red-breasted Nuthatch: This species was widely reported in higher than usual, but 
not large, numbers; best count was a moderate 10 in Omaha 23 Oct (JGr). 
Earliest were 2 in Kimball Co 11 Aug (SJD) and one in Winside 22 Aug 
(NB). 

White-breasted Nuthatch: Interesting was the presence of both subspecies at L 
Minatare, Scotts Bluff Co, 16 Sep, identified by call notes (SJD.JGi). Data 
at hand indicate that both subspecies wander from the breeding range in fall 
at about the same time, mid-Sep. 

Pygmy Nuthatch: This species was “ubiquitous” at Chadron SP 12 Sep (JRi), 
where it is resident. 

Brown Creeper: One at FF 25 Aug (JGr) was likely one of the summering birds 
there. First migrant was at Calamus Res 23 Sep (WRS), rather early. 

Rock Wren: The 4 at WSR 28 Oct (HKH) were rather late. 

Carolina Wren: One at Dannebrog 17 Nov (LR,RH,MB) was probably a fall 
disperser; evidence shows this species expands its range by fall movement 
to new areas and survival of the following winter potentially to breed in the 
spring. 

House Wren: Routine reports. 

Winter Wren: Routine reports. 

Sedge Wren: Sedge Wrens appeared in the east as expected during Jul-Aug; good 
numbers were in suitable se. Nebraska grasslands, notably those occupied 
by Henslow’s Sparrows (WRS) and 6 were in a grassland at Harvard Marsh 
occupied by Henslow’s 7 Aug (PD,CW). One at ADF 29 Oct (L&CF) was 
rather late. 

Marsh Wren: The well-known late summer influx of Sedge Wrens in Nebraska may 
also apply to Marsh Wren; 6 eastern types were singing vigorously in the e. 
RWB 4 Aug (JGJ) and another was found 25 Aug (JGJ). Confirmation of 
breeding by such birds was provided by the presence of a newly-fledged 
young bird with an agitated adult at Jack Sinn WMA, Saunders & 
Lancaster Cos, 22 Sep (WRS,JGJ,SR). Additional breeding and late 
summer records south of the Platte River may fit this pattern also. 

Golden-crowned Kinglet: Routine reports. 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet: Rather early was one at BOL 15 Sep (LE), and rather late 
was one at North Platte 5 Nov (TJW). 

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher: Northward expansion continues in central Nebraska, now 
that the species has reached the nw. and ne. comers of the state (see 
Summer Report). One was in Cherry Co 25 Aug (JJ), and another was in 
Thomas Co 29 Sep (NOU), the latter the latest on record by 2 days. 



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Eastern Bluebird: Routine reports. 

Mountain Bluebird: Migrants appear in mid-Aug in the west; one was in Kimball 
Co 17 Aug (DL). One in Thomas Co 29 Sep (NOU) was a little earlier than 
usual. 

Townsend’s Solitaire: Earliest was noted southward in the west 8 Sep at Oliver 
Res (AB), and by 30 Sep solitaires were widespread in nc. Nebraska 
(NOU). Furthest se. was one in a cedar canyon in Hamilton Co 4 Nov 
(D&JP). 

Veery: One was identified by call by an observer familiar with thrush flight calls as 
it flew over Zorinsky L, Omaha, 25 Sep (JK). This is the latest on record 
by 3 days. 

Gray-cheeked Thrush: One was heard as it flew over Zorinsky L, Omaha 25 Sep 
(JK); this species migrates later than Veery, but is rare in fall. 

Swainson’s Thrush: Routine reports. 

Hermit Thrush: Routine reports. 

Wood Thrush: Routine reports. 

American Robin: Routine reports. 

Varied Thrush: One appeared at WSR 26 Oct for the 3rd straight year (HKH); 
several have been reported in the last few years. 

Gray Catbird: One in Norfolk 16 Nov (RS) was pushing the safety envelope. There 
are numerous reports into Dec or later, but most are in the southeast. 

Northern Mockingbird: The 7 in Kimball Co 11 Aug (SJD) was a good count 

Sage Thrasher: A surprising 6 were reported, all but one in the w. Panhandle as 
expected: singles were south of 1-80 Exit 1 in Kimball Co 8 and 25 Aug 
(SJD) and 31 Aug (JGJ); in Scotts Bluff Co 30 Aug (KD); and sw. of 
Kimball 15 Sep (SJD,JGi). The other was farther east, at CLNWR 1 Sep 
(MB,DSt); there are no fall records east of Garden Co. 

Brown Thrasher: Routine reports. 

Curve-billed Thrasher: The Frimann Ranch bird in extreme se. Sioux Co 
continues; he was seen 18 Aug (KD). His 5-year anniversary was 20 Oct 
2007. 

European Starling: As noted in previous years, starlings were seen hawking insects 
at North Platte 19 Sep (TJW); it was suggested that this happens when 
most swallows and swifts have departed, leaving an open food niche. 

American Pipit: One at LNB 9-10 Sep (JGJ,JJ,WF) was rather early. 

Sprague’s Pipit: Recent years have shown this species to be a regular migrant at 
SCP; this fall about 30 were found there 3-23 Oct (KP,JRi,EB,LE), with 
best day 7 Oct when 13 were found (JRi). Elsewhere, 2 were in s. Cherry 
Co 20 Sep (WF) and 2 in Seward Co 23 Oct (RE). 

Bohemian Waxwing: None were reported; arrival, when it occurs, is in mid-Nov. 

Cedar Waxwing; Routine reports. 

Blue-winged Warbler: The only report was of a male in Dixon Co 1 Sep (JJ), only 
the 12th fall record. Close to being the 13th, but taxonomically challenged, 
was a “Brewster’s Warbler” at FF 6 Sep (JRi), only the 2nd for Nebraska. 

Golden-winged Warbler: Only casual in fall, 3 were reported, only the 22nd-24th 
on record for fall: a single at FF 23 Aug (L&BP), a female there 29 Aug 
(JRi), and a single in Bellevue 11 Sep (L&BP). 

Tennessee Warbler: Routine reports. 

Orange-crowned Warbler: Routine reports. 

Nashville Warbler: Routine reports. 

Northern Parula: Routine reports. 

Yellow Warbler: Routine reports. 



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Chestnut-sided Warbler: The only reports were from a single yard, probably of the 
same bird, in Bellevue 18-28 Aug (L&BP). 

Magnolia Warbler: The only three reports were of singles in Bellevue 30 Aug 
(L&BP), Omaha 19 Sep (RE), and FF 29 Sep (JRi). 

Black-throated Blue Warbler: There were two reports of this regular but rare fall 
migrant, both from the Panhandle: two juvenile females were at Oliver Res 
15 Sep (SJD,JGi, photo) and a single was in Scotts Bluff Co 20 Sep (AD). 

Yellow-rumped (Audubon’s) Warbler: There were 3 reports of migrants: 12 Sep 
at Chadron SP (JRi), where breeding is not known, 13 Sep at Oliver Res 
(JRi), and 22 Sep in Scotts Bluff Co (AK). 

Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler: Earliest migrants were 2 rather early at Smith L 
WMA, Sheridan Co, 26 Aug (SJ). Rather late for the Panhandle was one at 
WSR 28 Oct (HKH); another at LO 30 Nov (JGJ) was even more tardy, but 
not quite in the Panhandle. There are 3 Dec reports for LM. Rather late in 
the east were 3 in Lancaster Co 16 Nov (LE), and one in Nuckolls Co 11 
Nov (LR,RH), although “dozens” were still at Platte River SP, Cass Co, 9 
Nov (RM). 

Black-throated Gray Warbler: An adult male was photographed at Oliver Res 8 
Sep (AB); this is the 3rd documented fall record, all in the period 1-8 Sep, 
and with 2 spring records, the 5th overall. 

Black-throated Green Warbler: More than usual for fall were reported, about 11. 
Most were in the east, the earliest separate singles tying the record early 
date at FF 23 Aug (CNK,L&BP). Unexpected were 2 at Calamus Res 23 
Sep (WRS); this species is casual away from the east. 

Townsend’s Warbler: The two reports of this regular Panhandle migrant were of 2 
at WSR 27 Aug (HKH) and 2 juvenile males at Oliver Res 15 Sep 
(SJD,JGi; photo). 

Blackburnian Warbler: Eight were reported, quite good for fall for this species. 
Singles at FF and in the observers’ Bellevue yard 17 Aug (L&BP) were 
rather early. A surprise so far west was one in Morrill 27 Aug (KD), only 
the 6th Panhandle record. 

Yellow-throated Warbler: None were reported; the few late dates are in early Sep. 

Pine Warbler: A bird banded at Wildcat Hills NC 23 Nov was probably this 
species based on the details provided (DR); Pine Warbler has a propensity 
to linger into winter on occasion. 

Bay-breasted Warbler: The only reports were from the Bellevue area: possibly the 
same bird in the observers’ yard 26 Aug-7 Sep (L&BP), and another at FF 
5 Sep (L&BP). 

Cerulean Warbler: None were reported; most depart during Aug. 

Black-and-white Warbler: Routine reports. 

American Redstart: Routine reports. 

Oven bird: Routine reports. 

Northern Waterthrush: There are only about 15 reports from the Panhandle, and so 
of interest are one at Oliver Res 25 Aug (SJD) and two there 1 Sep (JGJ). 

Louisiana Waterthrush: None were reported; most depart in Aug. 

Kentucky Warbler: None were reported; departure is completed by mid-Sep. 

Mourning Warbler: The only report was of one in Dixon Co 1 Sep (JJ). 

MacGillivray’s Warbler: A photo taken in the observer’s Nickerson, Dodge Co, 
yard 8 Sep (JMu) allowed identification as this species. This is the 
easternmost documented fall record and one of only 5 east of the Panhandle. 

Common Yellowthroat: One at GPD 27 Oct (RD) was 3rd latest on record. Most 
depart by early Oct. 



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Hooded Warbler: There are a surprising number of Panhandle reports for this 
southeastern species. A female was at WSR 27 Aug (HKH, details), about 
the 10th fall report for the state, half from the Panhandle, although few are 
documented. 

Wilson’s Warbler: This species arrives early in fall, this year especially so, with a 
male in Washington Co 5 Aug (RM) and another at Oliver Res 11 Aug 
(SJD). The Washington Co bird was 3rd earliest on record, the Oliver Res 
bird 6th. Best count was 52 at Oliver Res 1 Sep (SJD); high counts are in 
the range 70-81. 

Canada Warbler: Five were reported, all in the Missouri Valley 26 Aug-8 Sep (m. 
ob.), an average fall. 

Yellow-breasted Chat: Routine reports. 

Summer Tanager: One at FF 29 Aug (JRi) suggests continuing summer presence 
there, a recent phenomenon. 

Scarlet Tanager: Routine reports. 

Western Tanager: More than usual were reported, about 15, all from the Panhandle 
27 Aug-20 Sep, including 7 in a tree at Bushnell 13 Sep (JRi). 

Green-tailed Towhee: Three were reported, a good showing, as there were only 16 
fall records prior; singles were at Oliver Res 1 Sep (JGJ) and 13 Sep (JRi), 
and near Bushnell 15 Sep (SJD,JGi). 

Spotted Towhee: This species moves southeastward in fall; first arrivals were 
detected rather early 22 Sep at Broken Bow (TH), and in Saunders and 
Butler Cos (LE). 

Eastern Towhee: A phenotypic male in Nuckolls Co 8 Aug sang “perfect” songs of 
each species one after the other (LR,RH); as the songs are learned, any 
combination is possible for birds in the hybrid zone (LR,RH). Somewhat 
northwest of the expected range was one in Antelope Co 28 Sep (LE), 
where hybrids and Spotteds would be expected to predominate. 

Cassin’s Sparrow: None were reported; departure is in Aug. 

American Tree Sparrow: Arrival was a bit later than usual, with first sightings 24 
Oct (JJ, L&CF,TP). 

Chipping Sparrow: Adults were feeding fledglings in Lincoln 22 Aug (NP), a 
rather late brood. Chipping Sparrows that linger after mid-Nov are usually 
solitary; thus rather late for small groups were 6 at Platte River SP, Cass 
Co, 9 Nov (RM) and 3 in Clay Center 11 Nov (PD). 

Clay-colored Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Brewer’s Sparrow: The only report was of one in Kimball Co 8 Sep (AB). Most 
depart during Sep. 

Field Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Vesper Sparrow: Away from the north and Missouri Valley summer records are 
few. Thus of interest were 5 in Seward Co 4 Aug (JGJ) and another there 18 
Aug (LR,RH). These sightings probably indicate the west edge of the 
summer range of the Missouri Valley population (subspecies gramineus), 
which has adapted to row-crop agriculture and may indeed be expanding its 
range. 

Lark Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Lark Bunting: Routine reports. 

Savannah Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Grasshopper Sparrow: A window-killed bird picked up in Seward Co 28 Oct (JG) 
was 4th latest on record. 



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Henslow’s Sparrow: An indication that this species occurs in good numbers in the 
limited amount of suitable habitat in Nebraska was the count of 31 singing 
birds in a pristine 160-acre prairie near Burchard 19 Aug (WRS). In this 
same field, an adult was carrying food 19 Aug; there are very few records of 
breeding for Nebraska (WRS). At least one was in grassland at Harvard 
Marsh 7 Aug (PD,CW). Migrants were found in roadside habitats in 
Lancaster Co 30 Aug, 22 Sep, and 27 Sep (LE). One at SCP 20 Oct (EB) 
was rather late; late dates are Oct 20,21, and 23. 

Le Conte’s Sparrow: The limits of the migration period were defined by one at 
Jack Sinn WMA, Saunders & Lancaster Cos, 16 Sep (SJD,JGJ,JGi) and 
another in Nemaha Co 31 Oct (RE). 

Nelson’s Sharp-tailed Sparrow: By far a record fall count was the 36 at Jack Sinn 
WMA, Saunders & Lancaster Cos, 16 Sep (SJD,JGJ,JGi); 20 were there 22 
Sep (WRS,JGJ,SR). One in Knox Co 3 Nov (MB) was 2nd-latest on 
record. Late dates are Oct 20,21, and 23. 

Fox Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Song Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Lincoln’s Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Swamp Sparrow: A presumed migrant in Saunders Co 19 Sep (LE) was rather 
early. 

White-throated Sparrow: Rather early were the 7 at LO 14 Sep (SJD,JGi). 

Harris’s Sparrow; Rare in the west, one was in Morrill 11 Nov (ECT) and two 
others were near there 12 Nov (KD). 

White-crowned Sparrow: Routine reports. 

Dark-eyed (White-winged) Junco: One was banded at Wildcat Hills NC 2 Oct 
(DR); the onset of fall movement in Nebraska is not well-known. 

Dark-eyed (Slate-colored) Junco: Routine reports. 

Dark-eyed (Oregon) Junco: One at Chadron SP 12 Sep (JRi) was 2nd-earliest on 
record; arrival is usually in late Sep. This form does not breed in Nebraska. 

Dark-eyed (Pink-sided) Junco: Best count was 24 in Lincoln Co 7 Nov (TJW). 

McCown’s Longspur. The only report was of 20 at WSR 16 Oct (HKH); migration 
occurs during Oct. 

Lapland Longspur: Best count was 500 in a flock near Holdrege 12 Nov (PD); 
high counts are in the thousands. 

Smith’s Longspur: There were 3 reports, the 18th-20th for fall, all convincing: 
singles were at SCP 3 Oct (KP), Hultine WPA, Clay Co, 10 Oct (RE), and 
Harvard Marsh 19 Oct (PD; details). Of the now 20 fall records, 14 are in 
the period 29 Sep-29 Oct. 

Chestnut-collared Longspur: None were reported; departure is in early Oct. 

Snow Bunting: A good fall for this species saw several reports, earliest the 3 birds 
rather early at LNB 29 Oct (RE); best count was 8 at GPD 24 Nov (MB). 

Northern Cardinal: Routine reports. 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak: Routine reports. 

Black-headed Grosbeak: Routine reports. 

Blue Grosbeak: Routine reports. 

Lazuli Bunting: Two somewhat easterly at CLNWR 1 Sep (MB,DSt) were likely 
migrants, as breeding is unknown there. 

Indigo Bunting: The 10 at Dodge Park, Omaha, 8 Sep (JRi) was an excellent fall 
count for this non-flocking species. Uncommon westward, one was at LO 
24 Aug (SJD). 



Vol. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


117 


Dickcissel: Rather late were a nest with nestlings in Clay Co 4 Aug and a nest with 
5 eggs in Clay Co 18 Aug, the latter unfortunately abandoned by 25 Aug 
(JGJ), One was rather late in Lancaster Co 25 Oct (LE). 

Bobolink: Routine reports. 

Red-winged Blackbird: Routine reports. 

Eastern Meadowlark: Routine reports. 

Western Meadowlark: Routine reports. 

Yellow-headed Blackbird: Rather late as far north was one in Rock Co 24 Nov 
(LR,RH). 

Rusty Blackbird: There were 3 reports of a total of about 30 birds; 5 were at 
Harvard Marsh 7 Nov (PD), one was at FF 12 Nov (L&BP), and 20-25 
were in Dixon Co 24 Nov (JJ). 

Brewer’s Blackbird: Routine reports. 

Common Grackle: The 3000 in the observer’s Mitchell yard 7 Sep (KD) would 
have put some stress on the feeder operation. Typical of lingering birds 
were singles in Lincoln 12 Nov (LE) and near Chadron 14 Nov (JF), the 
latter rather late for the location. 

Great-tailed Grackle: Large flocks, into the “hundreds” were in Lincoln and rural 
Lancaster Co 1 Oct-14 Nov (JGJ,JLL,KP,JRi). Still not numerous in the 
Sandhills, 10 were in Grant Co 29 Sep (LE). 

Brown-headed Cowbird: Routine reports. 

Orchard Oriole: One in Peru 1 Oct (TL) was rather late. 

Baltimore Oriole: Only the 4th Panhandle fall record was an adult male at Oliver 
Res 1 Sep (JGJ). Two at a feeder near Bennington 20 Sep (JM) were tardy. 

Bullock’s Oriole: Routine reports. 

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch: None were reported; arrival is in Nov. 

Purple Finch: This species staged a significant incursion into Nebraska this fall. 
Reports were widespread, including the Panhandle, where it usually rare. As 
one Bellevue observer noted regarding his feeder: “just like the good old 
days, Purple Finches and no House Finches” (RW). A similar lack of 
House Finches in the presence of Purple Finches was noted near Mitchell 
(KD), where Purple Finches are normally absent. First reported was an 
immature/female at a Bellevue feeder 26 Sep (ARy), 5th-earliest on record. 
Best count was 30 at Niobrara SP, Knox Co, 8 Nov (MB), 2nd highest fall 
count on record. In all, at least 140 were reported. 

Cassin’s Finch: A female was banded and photographed at Wildcat Hills NC 1 Oct 
(DR), 2nd-earliest on record. Another was heard singing at LO 30 Nov, but 
could not be sighted (JGJ). Typically, fall sightings are few, with numbers 
building into spring. 

House Finch: There was some evidence that this species was less in evidence when 
Purple Finches were present (see Purple Finch). 

Red Crossbill: A few more than usual were reported, but by no means large 
numbers; best count was 50 in Carter Canyon, Scotts Bluff Co, 30 Aug, 
about 50% juveniles (KD). This species is commonly seen in the Wildcat 
Hills, usually at Wildcat Hills NC feeders, where 15-20 were present 27 
Nov (AK). A few straggled eastward, notably one at a Peru feeder 1 Oct 
(TL), but also 2 at Norfolk 2 Nov (RS) and 1-2 at Creighton 2-25 Nov 
(MB). 

Common Redpoll: The only report of this late arriver was of 2 at FF 13 Nov (KJ). 

Pine Siskin: Along with Purple Finch, this species was much in evidence this fall. 
Beginning rather early with singles at LO 8 Aug (SJD) and in Kimball Co 
11 Aug (SJD), reports were statewide, including a best count of 40 in 



118 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 4 


Saline Co 3 Nov (LR,RH). Earliest in the east was a single in Saunders Co 
15 Sep (LE) and another at FF 29 Sep (JRi). 

Lesser Goldfinch: An intriguing report was of an adult male black-backed bird with 
a probable female at Wright’s Gap, Morrill Co, 1 Sep; a vigorously- 
begging juvenile appeared next to the male, which, however, ignored it 
(JGJ). This is the 16th summer record for the state. There are no breeding 
records for Nebraska, although it apparently breeds in se. Wyoming. 

American Goldfinch: Routine reports. 

House Sparrow: A feeder operator reported increasing numbers of this species in the 
Mitchell area, with 123 at the feeder 12 Nov (KD). 


Eurasian Tree Sparrow — A First Record for Nebraska 

Mark A. Brogie 
508 Seeley, Box 316 
Creighton, NE 68729 
mbrogie@esu 1 .org 

On Thursday, 01 February 2007, Scott Raasch of rural Madison County called to 
say he had what he believed to be a Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) 
coming to a feeder at his house just east of Enola. The bird had been present for 
about a week, although he had just identified the species upon purchasing a new 
field guide. He reported that the bird was very wary and only stayed for a short time 
at the feeder. The bird was most often observed in the early morning or just before 
dusk. 

Dave Heidt and I arrived the following evening and were told we had just missed 
the bird by a few minutes. We saw a photo that Scott had taken of the bird earlier in 
the day and it was clearly an adult Eurasian Tree Sparrow. We waited until dusk 
without seeing the bird. 

Ellen Brogie, Dave Heidt, and I arrived before sunrise on 03 February, and after a 
wait of about an hour the bird appeared. Ellen was able to get several photographs 
of the bird during the few minutes it spent at the feeder. We waited for another hour 
or more without the bird reappearing. 

The bird was in the company of several House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) and 
had the general body structure and appearance of a male House Sparrow, but with 
veiy distinct differences. The most notable feature that stood out was the black 
auricular spot surrounded by white. The bird was noticeably smaller than a House 
Sparrow and nearby House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus). The bird had a brown 
crown rather than gray of a male House Sparrow. The bird did not possess as much 
black on the throat as a House Sparrow and the white neck collar was also very 
distinctive. From the back, the bird appeared to be a small House Sparrow. 
Although Eurasian Tree Sparrow is known to hybridize with the House Sparrow 
(Leckie, 2001) the bird appeared phenotypically pure and showed no characteristics 
of hybridization discussed by Leckie. 




Vol. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


119 



Eurasian Tree Sparrow Photo by Ellen L. Brogie 

On the morning of 04 February, while in the company of Anne Brogie, Scott 
Raasch, and Dave Stage, I was again able to study carefully and photograph the bird. 
Multiple observers viewed the bird over the following two weeks, although with 
warmer weather it became a less frequent visitor to the feeder. It was last observed 
on 15 February 2007. 

The above constitutes the first documentation of Eurasian Tree Sparrow in 
Nebraska. In conjunction with the only South Dakota record (Thompson and 
Tallman 2005) and the one Manitoba record (Koess 1988), it also represents one of 
the most westward mid-continent sightings of this species. 

Eurasian Tree Sparrows were introduced to North America in 1870 when birds of 
German origin were released in Lafayette Park, St. Louis, Missouri (Leckie 2001). 
The offspring of these birds persist to this day, but the population appears to have 
remained localized to eastern Missouri, west-central Illinois, and southeastern Iowa 
(Barlow and Leckie 2000). Recent reports indicate increasing numbers and 
expansion of Eurasian Tree Sparrow range in Iowa (Castor 2005, Dinsmore 2007) 
and Illinois (Johnson 2006). The 106th (2005-2006) Christmas Bird Count 
established a new high (763) in southeast Iowa (Caster 2006). 



120 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


Vol. 75 No. 4 


Eurasian Tree Sparrows are essentially non-migratory, both in North America and 
in their natural range across Europe and temperate Asia. However, recent records 
show that individuals wander, especially in winter (Johnson 2005, Svingen 2006, 
Eddleman 2007). Competition with the larger House Sparrow for nest sites and 
winter food is possibly the major reason in limiting Eurasian Tree Sparrow 
expansion (Anderson 1978). Recent declines in House Sparrow populations may be 
a contributing factor in current expansion and out-of-range sightings of Eurasian Tree 
Sparrows. 


Literature Cited: 

Anderson, T.R. Population Studies of European Tree Sparrows in North America . 
University of Kansas Museum of Natural History, Occasional Papers 70 
(1978): 1-58. 

Barlow, J.C., and S.N. Leckie. "Eurasian Tree Sparrow {Passer montanus )." The 
Birds of North America , No. 560. Ed. A. Poole and F. Gill. Philadelphia: 
The Birds of North America, Inc., 2000. 

Castor, C. "Regional Summaries of the 105th Christmas Bird Count (Iowa)." 
American Birds 59 (2005): 83-84. 

Castor, C. "Regional Summaries of the 106th Christmas Bird Count (Iowa)." 
American Birds 60 (2006): 83-84. 

Dinsmore, JJ. "The Nesting Season: June through July 2006. The Regional 
Reports (Iowa & Missouri)." North American Birds 60 (2007): 533-535. 

Eddleman, B. "Fall Migration. August through November 2006. The Regional 
Reports (Iowa & Missouri)." North American Birds 61 (2007): 15-11. 

Johnson, D.B. "Regional Summaries of the 105th Christmas Bird Count 
(Illinois)." American Birds 59 (2005): 80-82. 

Johnson, D.B. "Regional Summaries of the 106th Christmas Bird Count 
(Illinois)." American Birds 60 (2006): 81-82. 

Koess, R.F. "Eurasian Tree Sparrow in Manitoba Canada." Blue Jay 46 (1988): 34- 
35. 

Leckie, S. "Rare, Local, Little-known, and Declining North American Breeders: A 
Closer Look: Eurasian Tree Sparrow." Birding 33 (2001): 460-467. 

Svingen P.H. "Fall Migration. August through November 2005. The Regional 
Reports (Western Great Lakes)." North American Birds 60 (2006): 75-78. 

Thompson, R. and D.Tallman. "Eurasian Tree Sparrow—a New Species for South 
Dakota." South Dakota Bird Notes 57 (2005): 83. 



Vol. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


121 


Halsey Fall Field Days 


The 2007 NOU 
Fall Field Days were 
held at the 4-H Camp 
in the Nebraska 
National Forest near 
Halsey on September 
28-30, 2007. Among 
the approximately 45 
in attendance were two 
first time attendees: 
Juanita Rice of 
Fairmont and Tim 
Hajda of Broken Bow. 

Wayne Mollhoff 
spoke on Friday night 
about the progress on 
the new breeding bird 
atlas: "A Funny Thing 
Happened on the Way 
multimedia presentation 


Field trips to Cherry, Logan and Brown Counties were led by Clem 
Klaphake, Mark Brogie and Dave Heidt. A final tally of 121 species was recorded. 
Among the highlights of the meeting was a Common Raven found on Clem 
Klaphake’s field trip in Cherry County, a cooperative Eastern Screech-Owl called in 
to the camp by 
Mark Brogie on 
Saturday night, 
and a road-killed 
Common 
Poorwill found 
and displayed to 
the group by 
Wayne Mollhoff. 

The Poorwill 
was molting its 
flight feathers, 
and Wayne 
prepared spread¬ 
wing mounts for 
the Nebraska 
State Museum 
collections. 

White-crowned Sparrow at Halsey NOU Meeting 

Photo courtesy of Paul Johnsgard 




Vesper Sparrow at Halsey NOU Meeting 
Photo courtesy of Paul Johnsgard 


to the Atlas", and on Saturday night, Bob Rooney did a 
entitled "A Sandhills Odyssey". 




122_The Nebraska Bird Review_Vol, 75 No. 4 

Fall NOU Meeting at Halsey 



Blaine 

Brown 

Cherry 

Custer 

Grant 

Hooker 

Logan 

Thomas 

Canada Goose 


X 

X 


X 




Trumpeter Swan 



X 


X 




Wood Duck 


X 

X 





X 

Gadwall 



X 


X 

X 



American Wigeon 



X 


X 

X 

X 


Mallard 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 


Blue-winged Teal 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 



Northern Shoveler 


X 

X 


X 

X 



Northern Pintail 


X 



X 


X 


Green-winged Teal 


X 

X 


X 

X 

X 


Redhead 


X 



X 

X 



Ring-necked Duck 





X 



X 

Lesser Scaup 





X 




Bufflehead 





X 


X 


Ruddy Duck 



X 


X 




Ring-necked Pheasant 


X 

X 






Sharp-tailed Grouse 

X 


X 





X 

Greater Prairie-Chicken 



X 





X 

Wild Turkey 

X 


X 

X 

X 



X 

Pied-billed Grebe 


X 

X 


X 

X 


X 

Western Grebe 


X 

X 


X 




American White Pelican 

X 

X 

X 


X 




Double-crested Cormorant 


X 

X 


X 

X 



Great Blue Heron 


X 

X 


X 



X 

White-faced Ibis 


X 



X 




Turkey Vulture 

X 

X 


X 

X 



X 

Osprey 

X 

X 





X 

X 

Bald Eagle 

X 

X 

X 





X 

Northern Harrier 

X 

X 

X 


X 



X 

Sharp-shinned Hawk 






X 


X 

Cooper's Hawk 

X 


X 





X 

Swainson's Hawk 

X 


X 


X 

X 


X 

Red-tailed Hawk 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Ferruginous Hawk 


X 







Golden Eagle 





X 



X 

American Kestrel 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 


X 

Merlin 








X 

Peregrine Falcon 

X 


X 






Prairie Falcon 

X 


X 






Sora 


X 






X 

American Coot 


X 

X 


X 


X 

X 

Killdeer 


X 

X 


X 


X 


American Avocet 





X 































































Vol 75 No. 4 _The Nebraska Bird Review_1 21 

Fall NOU Meeting at Halsey 



Blaine 

Brown 

Cherry 

Custer 

Grant 

Hooker 

Logan 

Thomas 

Spotted Sandpiper 



X 


X 




Greater Yellow legs 


X 

X 


X 




Willet 





X 




Lesser Yellowlegs 


X 

X 


X 




Sanderling 







X 


Least Sandpiper 





X 




Baird's Sandpiper 


X 



X 


X 


Pectoral Sandpiper 





X 




Stilt Sandpiper 





X 




Long-billed Dowitcher 





X 




Wilson's Snipe 


X 



X 




Wilson’s Phalarope 





X 




Ring-billed Gull 


X 

X 


X 


X 


Rock Pigeon 






X 


X 

Eurasian Collared-Dove 

X 

X 



X 

X 


X 

Mourning Dove 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

Eastern Screech-Owl 








X 

Great Homed Owl 

X 




X 

X 



Burrowing Owl 






X 



Long-eared Owl 






X 



Common Poorwill 






X 



Belted Kingfisher 


X 

X 



X 



Red-headed Woodpecker 



X 






Downy Woodpecker 


X 

X 



X 


X 

Hairy Woodpecker 



X 





X 

Northern Flicker 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

X 

X 

Eastern Phoebe 

X 


X 






Say's Phoebe 





X 




Blue Jay 

X 

X 

X 


X 



X 

American Crow 

X 

X 

X 




X 

X 

Common Raven 



X 






Homed Lark 

X 

X 

X 



X 

X 

X 

Bam Swallow 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Black-capped Chickadee 








X 

Red-breasted Nuthatch 

X 

X 

X 


X 



X 

White-breasted Nuthatch 





X 



X 

House Wren 


X 



X 



X 

Marsh Wren 

X 

X 






X 

Ruby-crowned Kinglet 

X 




X 




Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 








X 

Eastern Bluebird 



X 





X 

Mountain Bluebird 








X 

Townsend's Solitaire 



X 


X 

X 


X 


























































124 


The Nebraska Bird Review 

Fall NOU Meeting at Halsey 


Vol- 75 No. 4 



Blaine 

Brown 

Cherry 

Custer 

Grant 

Hooker 

Logan 

Thomas 

American Robin 

X 


X 


X 


X 

X 

Gray Catbird 



X 






European Starling 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

American Pipit 


X 

X 



X 



Cedar Waxwing 



X 





X 

Orange-crowned Warbler 

X 


X 





X 

Yellow Warbler 



X 






Yellow-rumped Warbler 

X 

X 

X 


X 



X 

Common Yellowthroat 



X 



X 



Wilson's Warbler 

X 

X 







Spotted Towhee 

X 

X 

X 



X 


X 

Chipping Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 


X 

Clay-colored Sparrow 

X 

X 



X 



X 

Field Sparrow 

X 




X 



X 

Vesper Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 



X 

X 

X 

Lark Sparrow 

X 


X 



X 

X 

X 

Savannah Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 


X 

X 

X 

X 

Grasshopper Sparrow 


X 




X 


X 

Song Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 





X 

Lincoln's Sparrow 

X 


X 




X 

X 

Swamp Sparrow 

X 








White-throated Sparrow 

X 


X 



X 


X 

Harris's Sparrow 

X 








White-crowned Sparrow 

X 

X 

X 



X 


X 

Dark-eyed Junco 



X 


X 


X 

X 

Northern Cardinal 








X 

Red-winged Blackbird 

X 

X 

X 


X 


X 

X 

Western Meadowlark 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

Yellow-headed Blackbird 

X 

X 



X 


X 


Brewer's Blackbird 








X 

Common Grackle 

X 


X 


X 




Great-tailed Grackle 





X 




Brown-headed Cowbird 





X 



X 

House Finch 





X 

X 



Pine Siskin 

X 





X 


X 

American Goldfinch 

X 

X 

X 



X 

X 

X 

House Sparrow 

X 







X 










Total Species: 123 

53 

58 

71 

9 

68 

41 

27 

66 



























































Vol. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 

index to Volume 75 


121 


Accipiter species 22-23 
Ahlering, M. A. 60 
Alexander, Irene 19 
Allen, Sue 19 

Allwine Prairie Preserve 15 
American Ornithologists' Union 93 
AmesCBC 17-30 
Amiotte, Sue 61 
Anderson, 

Chris 19 
T.R. 120 

Ani, Groove-billed 88 

Aubushon, Kathy 18 

Avocet, American 41, 76, 106, 122 

Bachel, Elaine 100 
Backer, Gordon 18 
Badura, Laurel 36, 72, 100 
Barlow, J. C. 120 
Barry, Bob 4, 18 
Barth, Roland 36 
Baumgarten, H. E. 16 
Beaver Valley CBC 17-30 
Bedows, Elliott 4, 18, 19, 35, 99 
Berthelsen, Gary 4 
Birds of Nebraska 109 
Bishop, Andy 53, 59 
Bittern, 

American 39, 64, 74, 103 
Least 39, 74, 103 
Blackbird, 

Brewer's 12, 28-29, 52, 85, 117, 124 
Red-winged 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 

117, 124 

Rusty 12,28-29,52,117 
Yellow-headed 12, 52, 66, 85, 117, 
124 

Blankenau, Laurine 18, 19 
Bloom, Tom 36 
Bluebird, 

Eastern 10, 18, 26-27, 47, 65, 82, 113, 
123 

Mountain 10,47,82,113,123 
Bly, Bart 71,99 
Bobolink 52, 66, 84-85, 117 
Bobwhite, Northern 6, 20-21, 38, 63, 73, 
102 

Borgelt, Joyce 19 
Bossman, Bill 19 
Bowley, 

Jodi 93 
Tyler 93 
Brambling 92 

Branched Oak-Seward CBC 17-30 
Brant 91 

Brania canadensis interior 37 
Brees, Aaron 99 


Brockmoller, Norma 4, 19, 100 
Brogie, 

Anne 119 
Ben 18, 19 
Ed M, 19 
Ellen 118-119 

Mark 4, 18, 19, 36, 72, 86, 93, 100, 
118-119, 121 
Brown, 

Bill 19 
Charles 35 
Linda 4, 19 
Steve 36 
Bruner, L, 16 

Bufflehead 6, 20-21, 38, 102, 122 
Bunting, 

Indigo 52, 66, 84, 116 
Lark 50, 66. 70, 83, 115 
Lazuli 52, 66, 70, 84, 116 
Snow 11,18,28-29,116 
Buteo species 22-23 

Calamus-Loup CBC 17-30 
Canterbury, Jackie 19 
Canvasback 5. 20-21, 37, 63, 73, 101 
Cardinal, Northern 12, 18, 28-29, 51, 66, 
84, 116, 124 
Cargill, Marilee 18 
Carlini, John 93 
Castor, C. 120 

Catbird, Gray 48, 65, 82, 113, 124 
Central Nebraska Public Power District 
106 

Chat, Yellow-breasted 49, 66, 82, 115 
Chickadee, 

Black-capped 10, 17, 26-27, 46, 65, 
81,98, 112, 123 
Mountain 98, 112 
Christiansen, Donna 19 
Christmas Bird Counts 17-30 
Chuck-will’s-widow 44, 79, 109 
Collins, S. L. 61 

Coot, American 7, 22-23, 34, 40, 64, 75, 
105, 122 
Cormorant, 

Double-crested 6, 22-23, 39, 64, 74, 
103, 122 
Neotropic 87 
Counties 

Adams 78, 80, 81 
Antelope 43, 89 
Arthur 52,63-66 
Banner 80, 81, 82, 106 
Blaine 51, 110, 122-124 
Boone 6 
Box Butte 77 
Brown 121-124 





126 


The Nebraska Bird Review 

Index to Volume 75 


Vol. 75 No. 4 


Counties, continued 

Buffalo 40, 50. 76, 84, 92, 104, 112 
Burt 79 

Butler 15, 74, 115 

Cass 11, 39, 44, 46, 49, 52, 82, 83, 89, 
91, 114, 115 
Cedar 10, 88, 92, 102 
Cherry 49, 73, 76, 80, 85, 89. 90, 92, 

109, 111, 112, 113, 121-124 
Cheyenne 80, 92, 106 

Clay 16, 38, 44, 48. 72, 73, 77, 89, 91, 

101, 116, 117 
Colfax 6, 45, 46 

Custer 63-66, 75, 111, 121-124 
Dakota 37, 42, 45, 46, 48 
Dawes 80, 81, 83, 84, 85, 92 
Dawson 47, 52 
Deuel 109 

Dixon 6, 43, 45, 46, 48, 50, 52, 73, 83, 
91, 108, 110, 113, 114, 117 
Dodge 11,50,78,80,114 
Douglas 8, 14, 15, 39, 40, 44, 46, 49, 
52, 83, 84, 104 
Fillmore 38, 42, 43, 77, 89 
Frontier 45, 50, 63-66 
Gage 5, 10, 53, 55, 58, 82 
Garden 44, 48, 49, 92, 111, 113 
Grant 74, 103, 117, 122-124 
Hall 8, 14, 15, 45, 47, 50, 90 
Hamilton 73, 104, 106, 111, 113 
Harlan 45, 83, 111 
Hayes 52,63-66,83 
Hitchcock 83, 109 
Holt 47 

Hooker 122-124 
Jefferson 9,78,83,85 
Johnson 53, 55, 57, 58 
Kearney 80 

Keith 38, 39, 44, 47, 75, 76, 79, 83, 84, 
85, 89, 90, 91, 104 
KeyaPaha 9 

Kimball 51, 75, 80. 83, 84, 104, 106, 

110, 112, 113, 115, 117 

Knox 38, 39, 40, 46, 47, 51, 81, 88. 

102, 103, 104, 107, 108, 116, 117 
Lancaster 5, 8. 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 39, 

41, 42, 48, 52, 53, 55. 73, 74, 75, 

76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 83, 84, 89, 

90, 101, 102, 104, 105, 107, 111, 
112, 114, 116, 117 
Lincoln 6, 39, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 

51, 52, 63-66, 77, 78, 79, 81, 83, 

85, 90, 101, 102, 105, 111, 116 
Logan 48, 63-66, 121-124 
Loup 7 


Counties, continued 
Madison 118 
McPherson 63-66, 79, 103 
Merrick 104, 110, 111 
Morrill 40, 51, 73, 74, 76, 77, 80, 83, 
89, 104, 105, 110, 118 
Nance 47, 91 

Nemaha 53, 55, 73, 80, 116 
Nuckolls 38, 44, 46, 50, 52, 75, 77, 
114, 115 

Otoe 39, 44, 45, 50, 51, 53, 55, 78, 81, 
82, 84, 110 

Pawnee 14, 15, 53, 55, 57, 58-59, 82 
Perkins 48 

Phelps 37, 41, 73, 101, 103 
Pierce 89, 102 
Platte 5, 6, 11, 38, 42, 90 
Polk 5, 6, 104, 107, 110 
Richardson 7, 9, 53, 55, 84 
Rock 84, 104, 117 
Saline 10.85,111,118 
Sarpy 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 37, 38, 39, 40, 43, 
48, 49. 51. 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 

79. 90, 92, 101, 102, 108 
Saunders 43, 77, 112, 115, 116, 118 
Scotts Bluff 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 41, 43, 44, 

45. 46, 47, 48, 50, 51, 52, 78, 79, 

80, 81, 82, 85, 88, 101, 104, 105, 
107, 109, 112, 113, 114, 117 

Seward 7, 15, 37, 41, 42, 44, 45, 46, 
50, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 
84,85,101,103,105,113,115 
Sheridan 44, 80, 107, 114 
Sherman 105 

Sioux 38, 48, 51, 80, 82, 83, 84, 90, 
92, 98, 102, 110, 112, 113 
Stanton 15 
Thayer 39, 42 

Thomas 45, 51, 103, 112, 113, 122- 
124 

Thurston 46 

Washington 9, 12, 14, 15, 41, 44, 48, 
79, 82, 84, 115 
Wayne 12,48,52 
Webster 16, 102 

York 37, 38, 41, 42, 50, 73, 74, 106 
Cowbird, Brown-headed 12, 28-29, 52, 
66, 85, 117, 124 
Crane, 

Common 34, 41 
Sandhill 8, 41, 76, 89, 105 
Whooping 41, 89, 98, 105 
Crawford CBC 17-30 
Crawford, David 18, 19 
Creeper, Brown 26-27, 47, 81, 112 





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index Id Volume 75 


121 


Crossbill, Red 12, 28-29, 52, 85, 117 
Crow, American 10, 17, 26-27. 46, 65, 81, 
111, 123 
Cuckoo, 

Black-billed 44, 78, 88, 109 
Yellow-billed 44, 64, 78, 88, 109 
Curlew, Long-billed 42, 64, 77, 106 
Curtis, Anton 18 

Dale, B. C. 60 
Davis, 

C. A. 60 
Fritz 19 
S.K. 60 
DeGarmo, 

Alex 18,93 
Kevin 18 

DeLara, Kathy 4, 18, 19, 36, 72, 93, 100 
DeSoto-Boyer CBC 17-30 
DiBemard, Barbara 19 
Dickcissel 52, 66, 84, 117 
Dietrich, Roger 5, 36, 100 
Dinsmore, 

J.J. 120 

Stephen J. 5, 18, 72, 93, 100 
Douglas, Art 99 
Dove, 

Eurasian Collared- 9, 17, 24-25, 43, 

64, 78, 108, 123 
Inca 9, 17, 24-25, 44, 90 
Mourning 4, 9, 17, 24-25, 43, 64, 78, 
109, 123 

White-winged 43, 44, 78, 108-109 
Dowitcher, 

Long-billed 42, 64, 77, 107, 123 
Short-billed 42, 64, 77, 107 
Drawbaugh, 

Dean 19 
Phyllis 18, 19 
Ducey, James E. 36, 100 
Duck, 

American Black 87, 101 
Harlequin 88 
Long-tailed 38, 102 
Ring-necked 6, 20-21, 37. 73, 101, 

122 

Ruddy 6, 20-21, 38, 63, 73, 102, 122 
Wood 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 122 
Duey, Ann 4, 19, 35, 99 
Dunbar, Paul 5, 18, 36, 72, 93, 100 
Dunkel, Warren 19 
Dunlin 34, 42, 107 
Dunn, Pat 19 

Eades, 

James 19 

Rick 5, 18, 19, 36, 72, 93, 100 


Eagle, 

Bald 7, 22-23, 39, 75, 104. 122 
Golden 7, 22-23, 40, 75, 104, 122 
Eddleman, B. 120 
Egret, 

Cattle 39, 64, 74, 103 
Great 39, 74, 103 
Snowy 39, 74, 103 
Einemann, Larry 4, 18, 19, 36, 72, 83, 
100, 112 
Ely, Dave 35 
Emery, Nathaniel 93 
Engle, D. M. 60 
Etherton, James 4, 18 
Eucker, Joyce 19 

Faaborg, J. 60 
Falco 

columbarius columbarius 40, 104 
peregrinus 
anatum 40 
tundrius 40 
Falcon, 

Peregrine 7, 40, 75, 104, 122 
Prairie 7, 22-23, 40, 75, 104, 122 
Falk, 

Carol 4, 36, 72, 100 
Laurence 4, 36, 72, 100 
Fallon, J. 16, 60 
Falzgraf, Nelli 18, 19, 36 
Fennell, Tim 36 
Fields, Jeff 19 
Finch, 

Cassin's 85, 87, 117 
House 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 117, 118, 
124 

Purple 12,28-29,52,98,117 
Finkhouse, Darlene 19 
Fish, Nancy 100 
Flack, William 5, 36, 101 
Flavin, John 4, 18, 36, 93, 100 
Fletcher, Greg 100 

Flicker, Northern 9, 24-25, 45, 65, 79, 
110, 123 
Floyd, Ted 70 
Flycatcher, 

Acadian 45, 79 
Alder 45, 79, 110 
Ash-throated 70, 80, 110 
Cordilleran 45, 80, 110 
Dusky 70, 110 
Gray 98, 110 

Great Crested 45, 65, 80, 111 
Hammond’s 92, 110 
Least 45, 65, 80, 110 
Olive-sided 45, 65, 79, 110 
Scissor-tailed 34, 45, 80 





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VoL 75 No. 4 


Flycatcher, continued 
Willow 45, 65, 80, 110 
Yellow-bellied 45 
Fox, Mitzi 18 
Frigatebird, 

Magnificent 103 
species 98, 103 
Frimann Ranch 113 
Fuchs, Bob 19 
Fuhlendorf, S. D. 60,61 

Gadwall 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 101, 122 

Gannon, Tom 101 

Garganey 91 

Gertsema, Mary 100 

Gibson, Robert 100 

Gillen, R. L. 61 

Gilliam, Jay 100 

Gnatcatcher, Blue-gray 34, 47, 82, 112, 
123 

Godwit, 

Hudsonian 42, 77 
Marbled 42, 64, 77, 106 
Goldeneye, 

Barrow's 6 

Common 6, 20-21, 38, 102 
Goldfinch, 

American 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 118, 
124 

Lesser 52, 92, 98, 118 
Goose, 

Cackling 5, 20-21, 37, 101 
Canada 5, 17, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 101, 
122 

Greater White-fronted 5, 20-21, 37, 72, 
101 

Pink-footed 91 
Ross’s 5, 20-21, 37, 72, 101 
Snow 5, 20-21, 37, 72, 91, 101 
blue 37 

Goshawk, Northern 7, 22-23, 40, 104 
Crackle, 

Common 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 117, 
124 

Great-tailed 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 117, 
124 

Grand Island CBC 17-30 
Grebe, 

Clark’s 6, 22-23, 39. 64, 74, 103 
Eared 34, 38, 64, 73, 102 
Horned 38, 102 

Pied-billed 22-23, 38, 63, 73, 102, 

122 

Red-necked 6, 22-23, 73, 102 
Western 6, 22-23, 39, 64, 74, 102, 122 


Green, 

M.T. 60 
Ruth 5, 72, 100 
Greer, Janet 4 
Grell, Carey 71 
Grenon, 

Alan 35, 94 
Betty 18, 19, 35, 71 
Grier, Bob 93 
Grosbeak, 

Black-headed 51, 66, 84, 116 
Blue 52,66,84, 116 
Evening 87 

Rose-breasted 51, 66, 84, 116 
Gross, 

Everett 62 
Mildred 61-62 

Grouse, Sharp-tailed 6, 20-21,38,73, 

102, 122 

Grundman, 

Jason 18 
Jonas 36, 100 

Gubanyi, Joe 4, 14, 15, 18, 19, 36, 71, 93, 
94, 100 

Gucciardo, Suzanne 18, 19 
Gull, 

Bonaparte's 43, 107 
California 8, 24-25, 43, 77, 107 
Franklin’s 8, 43, 77, 107 
Glaucous 8, 24-25, 43, 108 
Glaucous-winged 8 
Glaucous-winged x Herring 8 
Great Black-backed 89, 108 
Herring 8, 24-25, 43, 77, 108 
Laughing 89, 107 

Lesser Black-backed 8, 24-25, 43, 108 
Little 89 
Mew 43, 87 

Ring-billed 8. 24-25, 43, 64, 77, 107, 
123 

Sabine's 108 
Slaty-backed 8, 17, 24-25 
Thayer’s 8, 24-25, 43, 108 

Hajda, Tim 36, 72, 101, 121 
Hall, 

Carolyn 4,35,71,99 
John W. 36, 72 

Halsey Fall Field Days 121-124 
Hamilton, 

Luke 100 
R. G. 60 

Hansen, Matthew 19 

Harding, Robin 5, 18, 36, 63, 72, 100 

Harrell, W. C. 60 




Vol. 75 No. 4 


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Index to Volume 75 


129 


Harrier, Northern 7, 17, 22-23, 40, 64, 75, 
104, 122 

Harrison CBC 17-30 
Hatfield, Blake 18 
Hawk, 

Broad-winged 40. 104 
Cooper's 7, 22-23, 40, 64, 75, 104, 

122 

Ferruginous 7, 22-23, 40, 63, 75, 104, 
122 

Red-shouldered 7, 34, 40, 70, 75, 104 
Red-tailed 7, 17, 22-23, 40, 64, 75, 
104, 122 

dark morph 75, 104 
Harlan's 104 
Krider’s 40, 104 
Rough-legged 7, 22-23, 40, 104 
Sharp-shinned 7, 22-23, 40, 104, 122 
Swainson's 40, 64, 75, 104, 122 
Zone-tailed 34, 40 
Heidt, Dave 4, 18, 19, 118, 121 
Held, Renae 36 
Heller, Pat 36 
Helzer, Chris 15, 16 
Herkert, J. R. 16,60 
Heron, 

Great Blue 7, 17, 22-23, 39, 64, 74, 
103, 122 

Green 39, 64, 74, 103 
Little Blue 39, 74, 103 
Hicks, 

Maria 19 
Tyler 93 

Hilligas, Lewis 18 
Hines, J. E. 16,60 
Hoff, Michele 19 
Hoge, 

Glen 4, 35, 71, 100 
Wanda 4, 35, 71, 100 
Hughson, Helen K. 19, 36, 71, 93, 100 
Hula, Brian 35 
Hummingbird, 

Broad-tailed 70, 79, 98, 109-110 
Calliope 79, 109 
Ruby-throated 44, 79, 92, 109 
Rufous 79, 110 
Humpert, M. 16, 60 
Huntley, C. W. (Bill) 18,35,71,99 
Huser, 

Art 19 

Bill 4, 19, 35, 93 
Ibis, 

Glossy 39, 74, 89 
White-faced 39, 70, 74, 103, 122 
Iliff, Marshall 93 


Jacobsen, Tony 19 
Jaeger, Pomarine 90, 107 
Janes, Kim 100 
Janzen, Pete 5 
Jay, 

Blue 10, 24-25, 46, 65, 80, 111, 123 
Pinyon 10,46,80,111 
Johnsgard, Paul 19, 121 
Johnson, 

D. B. 120 

Jan 4, 19, 36, 71, 100 
Luke 19 
Richard 19 
Jones, 

S.L. 60 
Stephen 100 

Jorgensen, Joel G. 4, 13-16, 18, 36, 38, 
59, 60, 61, 71, 83, 93, 94, 100 
Junco, Dark-eyed 11, 28-29, 51, 84, 116, 
124 

Oregon 11, 28-29, 51, 116 
Pink-sided 28-29, 51, 116 
Slate-colored 28-29, 116 
White-winged 11, 28-29, 84, 116 

Katus, 

Dennis 71, 99 
Rhalene 71, 99 
Kaul, Robert 18 
Keller, Jay 100 
Kenitz, 

Alice 4, 19, 35, 71, 99 
Lee 4 

Kestrel, American 7, 22-23, 40, 64, 75, 
104, 122 

Killdeer 8, 22-23, 41, 64, 76, 106, 122 
Kim, Daniel H. 4, 15, 16, 35, 71 
Kingbird, 

Cassin’s 45, 80, 111 
Eastern 45, 65, 80, 111 
Western 45, 65, 80, 111 
Kingfisher, Belted 9, 17, 24-25, 44, 65, 
79, 110, 123 
Kinglet, 

Golden-crowned 10, 26-27, 47, 112 
Ruby-crowned 10, 26-27, 47, 112, 123 
Kingston, Vince 18 
Kirk, J. 4 

Kite, Mississippi 39, 75, 104 

Kittiwake, Black-legged 90, 108 

Klaphake, Clem 4, 18, 19, 35, 71, 99, 121 

Knaggs, Rodger 18 

Knedsen, Kyle 19 

Knot, Red 106 

Knott, Tim 19 

Knutie, Sarah 36 

Koehlmoos, Lyla 19 





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Vol- 75 No. 4 


Koess, R. F. 120 
Kovanda, 

Jim 19 
Sandy 19 
Kranik, Ken 4 
Kren, Josef 19, 63 
Kroodsma, D. E. 16, 60 
Kruse, 

Ann 18 
Ron 18 

Kuper, Catherine 19 
Kurth, Allen E. 35 
Kusek, Ray 18 

Labedz, Thomas E. 5, 18, 19 
Lackey, Jeanine L. 36, 100 
Lacy, Keith 4 

Lake McConaughy CBC 17-30 
Lamphere, Steve 18, 19 
Lark, Homed 10, 26-27, 46, 65, 81, 111, 
123 

Leckie, S.N. 120 
Lee, Teri 101 

Leger, Daniel 4, 19, 71, 99 
Lehner, Urban 19, 101 
Leslie, D. M. Jr. 60 
Lincoln CBC 17-30 
Longspur, 

Chestnut-collared 51, 84, 116 
Lapland 11,28-29, 51,116 
McCown’s 51, 84, 91, 116 
Smith’s 92, 116 
Loon, 

Common 6, 20-21, 38, 73, 102 
Pacific 102 
Red-throated 102 
Lowther, P. E. 60 
Luehrs, Richard 5 

Magpie, Black-billed 10, 17, 26-27, 46, 
65, 80-81, 111 

Mallard 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 101, 122 
Manning, Robert 72, 100 
Martin, Purple 46, 65, 81, 98, 111 
Maslowski, 

Linda 19 
Pete 19 

Mathieson, Marty 100 
Mattix, Sue 18, 19 
McCartney, Connie 18 
McCarty, John P. 15, 71 
McCoy, T.D. 60 
Meadowlark, 

Eastern 12, 52, 66, 85, 117 


Meadowlark, continued 
species 28-29 

Western 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 117, 
124 
Merganser, 

Common 6, 20-21, 38, 73, 102 
Hooded 6, 20-21, 38, 63, 73, 102 
Red-breasted 6, 20-21, 38, 102 
Merlin 7, 22-23, 40, 75, 104, 122 
Meyer, Jim 18 
Miller, 

Jeanne 18, 36, 71, 100 
John 4, 19, 100 
Mitchell, R. B. 61 

Mockingbird, Northern 11,26-27,48, 
66, 82, 113 

Mollhoff, Wayne J. 5, 16, 18, 36, 60, 63, 
72, 94, 121 

Moorhen, Common 40 
Morfeld, Tracy 36 
Morris, Steve 18, 72 
Mulliken, 

Elizabeth 18 
Jerry 18, 71, 100 
Munter, Emily 93 

Nature Conservancy, The 14-16 
Nebraska Breeding Bird Atlas 14 
Nebraska Game and Parks Commission 
16, 59 

Nebraska Natural Legacy Plan 14 
Nebraska State Museum 108 
Negus, L. P. 60 
Nelson, Brent 35 
Newbury, Ed 19 

Nighthawk, Common 44, 65, 78, 109, 

111 

Night-Heron, 

Black-crowned 39, 74, 103 
Yellow-crowned 39, 74, 103 
Noecker 

Colleen 4, 18, 35, 71, 99 
Don 4, 18, 35, 71, 99 
Norfolk CBC 17-30 
Noteman, Rosalie 18, 19 
NOU Records Committee 86-94 
Nutcracker, Clark’s 10, 111 
Nuthatch, 

Pygmy 10.26-27,47,81,112 
Red-breasted 10, 26-27, 47, 81, 98, 
112, 123 

White-breasted 10, 18, 26-27, 47, 65, 
81, 112, 123 
Eastern subspecies 47 
Western subspecies 47, 81 




Vol. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 

Index to Volume 75 


LIT 


O'Brien, Valerie 36 
O'Dell, 

Molly 18 
Tom 18 

Ollinger, Linda 4 
Omaha CBC 17-30 
Oriole, 

Baltimore 52, 66, 85, 117 
Bullock’s 52, 70, 85, 117 
Orchard 52,66, 85, 117 
Orr, Alan 4 

Osprey 39, 75, 104, 122 
Ovenbird 49,66,82, 114 
Owl, 

Bam 9, 17, 24-25, 44, 65, 78, 109 
Barred 9, 24-25, 44, 78, 90, 109 
Burrowing 44, 63, 65, 78, 109, 123 
Eastern Screech- 9, 24-25, 44, 78, 109, 
121, 123 
Flammulated 92 

Great Homed 9, 24-25, 44, 65, 78, 109, 
123 

Long-eared 9. 17, 24-25. 44, 78, 109, 
123 

Northern Saw-whet 9, 17, 24-25, 44 
Short-eared 9, 17, 44, 78, 109 
Snowy 9, 17, 24-25 

Padelford, 

Babs 4, 19, 36, 72, 100 
Loren 4, 19, 36, 72, 100 
Partners in Flight National Watch List 14 
Partridge, Gray 6, 38, 73, 102 
Parula, Northern 48, 82, 113 

Don 4, 18, 19, 35, 71, 83, 99 
Janis 4, 18, 19,35, 71,99 
Payton, Mark 106, 108 
Pelican, American White 6, 22-23, 39, 64, 
74, 103, 122 

Pester, Theresa 36, 72, 101 
Phalarope, 

Red 89, 107 
Red-necked 43, 77, 107 
Wilson's 43, 64, 77, 107, 123 
Pheasant, Ring-necked 6, 20-21, 38, 63, 
73, 102, 122 
Phoebe, 

Eastern 45, 65, 80, 110, 123 
Say’s 45, 65, 80, 110, 123 
Piercy, Willard 19 
Pierson, 

Con 99 
Donna 99, 105 

Pigeon, Rock 8, 24-25, 43, 64, 78, 108, 
123 


Pintail, Northern 5, 17, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 
101, 122 
Pipit, 

American 48,66, 113, 124 
Sprague’s 48, 113 
Piranga rubra cooperi 50 
Platte River Whooping Crane 
Maintenance Trust 14,15 
Plegadis ibis species 103 
Plover, 

American Golden- 34, 41, 76, 105 
Black-bellied 41, 64, 76, 105 
Mountain 34, 41, 76, 106 
Piping 41, 76, 106, 108 
Semipalmated 41, 64, 76, 106 
Snowy 41, 76, 106 
Poague, Kevin 14, 36, 72 
Ponca State Park CBC 17-30 
Pooecetes gramineus gramineus 115 
Poor-will. Common 44, 78, 109, 121, 
123 
Poppe, 

Janis 71 
LeRoy 71 

Prairie-Chicken, Greater 6, 20-21, 34, 38, 
58, 63, 70, 73, 102, 122 
Prairie Partners 106, 109 
Price, Dawn 18 
Probst, Jerry 19, 36 
Pruess, Neva 36, 100 
Putensen, Kathy 19 

Quinn, John 18 

Raasch, Scott 118-119 
Rail, 

Black 92 
King 7 

Virginia 7, 22-23, 40, 64, 75, 105 
Yellow 92 
Ramirez, Juan 19 

Randolph, Lanny 4, 18, 36, 63, 72, 100 

Rasmussen, Dick 19 

Ratziaff, 

Izen 61-62 
Neal 18, 19, 62 

Raven, Common 90, Ill, 121, 123 
Redhead 6, 20-21, 37, 63, 73, 101, 122 
Redpoll, Common 12, 28-29, 52, 117 
Redstart, American 49, 66, 82, 114 
Rehme, Sarah 18, 36, 72, 101 
Reinking, D. L. 16, 60 
Reitan, 

Arlys 71 
Ken 19 

Reyer, Allen 35,93,99 
Rezac, Kelly 19 




132 


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Vol. 75 No. 4 


Rice, Juanita 4, 100, 121 
Richter, Jean 19 
Rink, Justin 36, 71, 100 
Ripper, Dana 99 

Robin, American 10, 18, 26-27, 48, 65, 
82, 98, 113, 124 
Roche, Richard 16, 37 
Rohrbaugh, R. W. Jr. 60 
Roisen, Paul 5, 72, 93 
Rooney, Bob 121 
Rose, Kathleen 19, 100 
Rosy-Finch, Gray-crowned 117 
Russ, Jules 19 

Safarik, Laura 19 
Sanderling 42, 77, 106, 123 
Sandpiper, 

Baird's 8, 42, 64, 77, 107, 123 
Buff-breasted 42, 77, 107 
Least 42, 64, 77, 107, 123 
Pectoral 42, 64, 77, 107, 123 
Semipalmated 42, 64, 77, 106 
Solitary 41, 76, 87, 106 
Spotted 41, 64, 76, 87, 106, 123 
Stilt 34, 42, 77, 107, 123 
Upland 41. 64, 76-77, 106 
Western 42, 77, 89, 107 
White-rumped 34, 42, 64, 77 
Sapsucker, 

Red-naped 45, 110 
Yellow-bellied 4, 9, 24-25, 45, 110 
Sauer, J. R. 16,60 
Scaup, 

Greater 6, 20-21, 37, 101 
Lesser 6, 20-21, 37, 63, 73, 101, 122 
Schmid, Rick 19, 36, 72, 100 
Schneider, R. 16, 60 
Schoen, Bonnie 19 
Scholar, Eric 19 
Schwartz, Shari 93 
Scoter, 

Black 6, 102 
Surf 37, 102 
White-winged 38, 102 
Scottsbluff CBC 17-30 
Scoville, Vicki 19 
Sharpe, Roger 16, 60 
Sherman, Tyler 19 

Shoveler, Northern 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 
101, 122 
Shrike, 

Loggerhead 4, 9, 24-25, 45, 65, 80, 
111 

Northern 9, 24-25, 45, 111 
Sidle, John 63 


Siegfried, Ruben 5, 18, 19 
Silcock, W. Ross 4, 5, 13-16, 18, 34, 36, 
53-61, 70, 72, 93, 98, 101 
Simpson, Rachel 100 
Siskin, Pine 12, 28-29, 52, 85, 98, 117- 
118, 124 

Sitta carolinensis nelsoni 81 
Skaggs, Kent 36, 72, 93, 100 
Smith, 

David J. 19 
Patricia 18 

Snipe, Wilson’s 8, 24-25, 42, 64, 77, 

107, 123 

Snyder, Larry 36, 100 
Sohl, Terry 5 

Solitaire, Townsend’s 10, 26-27, 48, 113, 
123 

Sonderman, Carolyn 18 
Sora 40, 64, 75, 105, 122 
Sparrow, 

American Tree 11, 26-27, 50, 115 
Baird's 57 
Brewer’s 50, 83, 115 
Cassin’s 50, 83, 115 
Chipping 50, 66, 70, 83, 115, 124 
Clay-colored 50, 66, 115, 124 
Eurasian Tree 12,118-120 
Field 26-27, 50, 66, 83, 115, 124 
Fox 11,26-27,51,116 
Golden-crowned 34, 51 
Grasshopper 50, 66, 83-84, 115, 124 
Harris's 11,26-27,51,115, 124 
Henslow's 13-16, 50, 53-61, 84, 112, 
116 

House 12, 28-29, 52, 66, 85, 118, 120, 
124 

Lark 50, 66, 83, 115, 124 
Le Conte's 51, 116 
Lincoln's 51, 116, 124 
Nelson’s Sharp-tailed 51, 98, 116 
Savannah 50, 83, 115, 124 
Song 11, 26-27, 66, 84, 116, 124 
Swamp 11, 51,66, 84, 116, 124 
Vesper 50, 66, 70, 83, 115, 121, 124 
Eastern subspecies 115 
White-crowned 11, 28-29, 51, 115, 

121, 124 

White-throated 11, 26-27, 51, 115, 

124 

Spence, 

Charles 19 
Leo 19 

Spring Creek Prairie 14 
Stage, Dave 4, 35, 99, 119 
Stanley, Matt 19 





Vol. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 

Index to Volume 75 


in 


Stansberry, Brooke 19 
Starling, European 11, 26-27, 48, 66, 82, 
113, 124 
Stehn, Tom 36 
Steinauer, 

E. M. 61 
G. 16,60 
R.F. 61 

Steinbeck, Mary 18 

Sterkel, Audrey 4, 93 

Stilt, Black-necked 34, 41, 76, 106 

Stoiber, Greg 18, 19 

Stoner, K. 16, 60 

Stork, Wood 88, 89, 91-92 

Strong, Jon 18, 36 

Sullivan, S. 16, 61 

Svingen, P. H. 120 

Swallow, 

Bank 46, 65, 81, 111 
Bam 46, 65, 81, 112, 123 
Cliff 46,65, 81, 112 
Northern Rough-winged 46, 65, 81, 
111 

Tree 46,65,81, 111 
Violet-green 46,81, 111 
Swan, 

Trumpeter 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 101, 
122 

Tundra 37, 101 
Swanson, Phil 36 
Swenk, M. H. 16 
Swift, 

Chimney 44, 65, 79, 109 
White-throated 44, 79, 109 

Tacha, Martha 72, 100 
Tallman, D. 120 
Tanager, 

Scarlet 50, 83, 115 
Summer 34, 50, 83, 115 
Western 50, 70,83, 115 
Taylor, 

J. S. 61 
Scott 36 
Teal, 

Blue-winged 37, 63, 72, 101, 122 
Blue-winged x Cinnamon 37 
Cinnamon 37, 72, 101 
Green-winged 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 73, 
101, 122 

Tern, 

Arctic 87, 90 
Black 43, 64, 78, 87, 108 
Caspian 43, 78, 87, 108 
Common 43, 78, 87, 108 
Forster’s 43, 64, 78, 87, 108 
Least 43, 77-78, 87, 108 


Tern, continued 
Royal 98, 108 
Thomas, Edna Claire 100 
Thompson, R. 120 
Thrasher, 

Brown 11, 26-27, 48, 66, 82, 113 
Curve-billed 34, 48, 90, 98, 113 
Sage 113 
Throop, Vem 18 
Thrush, 

Gray-cheeked 48, 113 
Hermit 4, 10, 26-27, 48, 113 
Swainson's 48,65, 113 
Varied 10-11, 90, 113 
Wood 48, 82, 113 

Titmouse, Tufted 10, 26-27, 46, 81, 112 

Toll, Jerry 4, 14, 18, 36, 93 

Towhee, 

Eastern 50, 83, 115 
Green-tailed 115 

Spotted 11, 26-27, 50, 66, 83, 115, 

124 

Trindle, Bruce 99 
Tucker, Shane 18 

Turkey, Wild 6, 20-21, 38, 63, 73, 102, 
122 

Turnstone, Ruddy 34, 42, 106 

University of Nebraska State Museum 14 
Urwiller, Mark 72 
Usasz, Moni 19, 36 
Uttecht, Jan 19 

Veery 48,113 
Vermeire, L. T. 61 
Vickery, P. D. 16,60 
Vireo, 

Bell's 46, 65, 80, 111 
Blue-headed 46, 111 
Cassin’s 111 
Philadelphia 46, 111 
Plumbeous 46, 80, 111 
Red-eyed 46, 65, 80, 111 
Warbling 46,65,70,80, 111 
Yellow-throated 46, 80, 111 
Von Ehwegen, Jerry 19 
Vulture, Turkey 7, 39, 40, 64, 74, 103, 
122 

Wainstad, Clayton 19 
Walgren, 

Bruce 4, 18, 35, 71 
Donna 4, 18, 35, 71 
Walker, T. J. 5, 36, 63, 72, 93, 101 
Warbler, 

Bay-breasted 49, 114 
Black-and-white 49, 82, 114 




134 


The Nebraska Bird Review 

Index to Volume 75 


Vol. 75 No. 4 


Warbler, continued 
Blackburnian 49, 114 
Blackpoll 49 
Black-throated Blue 114 
Black-throated Gray 98,114 
Black-throated Green 49, 82, 114 
Blue-winged 48, 87, 113 
"Brewster's" 113 
Canada 49, 115 
Cape May 34, 48 
Cerulean 49, 82, 114 
Chestnut-sided 48, 114 
Connecticut 34, 49, 87 
Golden-winged 48, 113 
Hooded 49, 115 
Kentucky 49,82, 114 
MacGillivray’s 49,98,114 
Magnolia 48, 114 
Mourning 49, 114 
Nashville 48, 113 
Orange-crowned 48, 113, 124 
Palm 49 
Pine 11,90,114 
Prairie 34, 49 
Prothonotary 49, 82 
Tennessee 48, 113 
Townsend’s 1.14 
Wilson's 49, 115, 124 
Worm-eating 82 
Yellow 48,66, 82, 113, 124 
Yellow-rumped 4, 11, 26-27, 48, 82, 
114, 124 

Audubon’s 48, 82, 114 
Myrtle 48, 114 
Yellow-throated 49,82, 114 
Warrick, Gordon 35 
Waterthrush, 

Louisiana 49, 82, 114 
Northern 49, 66, 114 
Waxwing, 

Bohemian 11,90,113 
Cedar 11, 26-27, 48, 66, 82, 113, 124 
Weidenfeld, D. A. 60 
Wells, Bill 18 
Wheeler, Elsie 18 
Whimbrel 42 

Whip-poor-will 44, 79, 109 
Wigeon, 

American 5, 20-21, 37, 63, 72, 101, 
122 

Eurasian 37, 88 


Wild, Cole 93,99 
Willet 41, 64, 76, 87, 106, 123 
Wilson, Gabe 106, 108 
Wolcott, R.H. 16 
Wolfe, D. H. 60 
Wolfenbarger, LaReesa 15 
Wolff, Duane 4, 18, 19 
Wood, Gertrude 18, 100 
Woodcock, American 43, 77, t07 
Woodpecker, 

Downy 9, 24-25, 45, 65, 79, 110, 123, 
Hairy 9, 24-25, 45, 79, 110, 123 
Pileated 9, 45, 79, 110 
Red-bellied 9, 17, 24-25, 45, 65, 79, 
110 

Red-headed 9, 17, 24-25, 44, 65, 79, 
110, 123 
Wood-Pewee, 

Eastern 45, 65, 79, 110 
Western 45, 65, 79, 110 
Wren, 

Carolina 10, 18, 26-27, 34, 47, 81, 112 
House 47, 65, 81, 112, 123 
Marsh 10, 26-27, 47, 65, 81-82, 98, 
112, 123 

Eastern subspecies 112 
Rock 47, 65, 81, 112 
Sedge 47,81,98, 112 
Winter 10,26-27,47,112 
Wright, Rick 16, 36, 100 
Wylie, Bonnie 19 

Y pllnwlpot; 

Greater 8, 17, 22-23, 41, 76, 87, 106, 
123 

Lesser 41, 64, 76, 87, 106, 123 
Yellowthroat, Common 49, 66, 82, 114, 
124 

Young, Betty 18 

Zahurones, Penny 19 
Zimmerman, J, L. 61 
Zonotrichia leucophrys 
gambelii 5 1 
leucophtys 51 
oriantha 51 




Vnl. 75 No. 4 


The Nebraska Bird Review 


135 


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Records Committee Chairman : Mark Brogie, Box 316, Creighton, NE 68729; 
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Table of Contents 

Fall Field Report, Aug. - Nov. 2007 by W. Ross Silcock.98 

Eurasian Tree Sparrow - A First Record for Nebraska 

by Mark A. Brogie . 118 

NOU Fall Field Days at Halsey, Sept. 28-30, 2007 .121 

Index to Volume 75 ...125 

Subscription and Organization Information.135 


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